Mrs. J. P. Kahanamoku passes on, 1936.

MRS. J. P. KAHANAMOKU SETS THIS LIFE ASIDE

SHE WAS A MOTHER GREATLY BELOVED BY ALL

Mrs. Julia Paoa Kahanamoku left this life at 69 years old, and she is the mother of Sheriff Duke Paoa Kahanamoku. At 9 o’clock or so in the morning of this past Thursday, June 4, she left this life behind, at her residence at 1847 Ala Moana Road, after going into a decline through weakness for a long time. Her husband preceded her in death many years ago, Captain Duke H. Kahanamoku.

She was born here on Oahu, and she spent most of her life in Waikiki. She descended from the lines of the I and Mahi of Hawaii, …

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/11/1936, p. 1)

WAIHO MAI O MRS. J. P. KAHANAMOKU I KEIA OLA ANA

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Iune 11, 1936.

…from ancient times, and her birth father, Mr. Hoolae Paoa, was one of the people who oversaw many ahupuaa during the monarchy. She was a full Hawaiian by birth, as well as was her husband.

During her healthy days, she participated in many promotional activities in this land. During the years of the great world war [WWI], she put herself out doing all the work of the Red Cross [Ahahui Ke’a Ulaula] in Honolulu;* she was a member of the Kapiolani Maternity Association, Daugthers of Hawaii, and a member of the Kaahumanu Society [Ahahui Kaahumanu].

Mrs. Kahanamoku had six sons, boys who each went off to find his own fortune, boys who participated greatly in promotional activities as well as body-strengthening events in this land. She has two girls who are living, and one who passed some year ago; the ones living are Bernice and Kapiolani, and the third who died was Maria.

Her ashes were buried at the cemetery in Nuuanu.

This Newspaper joins in on the grieving with this family of children who are bereft of their parents, as well as the rest of the family; and we humbly beseech that the sad thoughts of this family of children and all of the ohana as well be lightened.

*It is no surprise that Duke himself was knitting warm clothes for the Red Cross!

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/11/1936, p. 4)

...au kahiko, a o kona luaui makuakane...

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Iune 11, 1836.

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Duke H. Kahanamoku, father of the world-famous Duke P. Kahanamoku, passes on, 1917.

DUKE K. KAHANAMOKU LEAVES THIS LIFE BEHIND.

Thursday last week, Duke K. Kahanamoku [Duke H. Kahanamoku] grew weary of this worldly life, the father of the swimming champion of Hawaii nei, at his home at 1847 Ala Moana Road, Waikiki.

On that day mentioned, Kahanamoku went swimming at the ocean that afternoon for his health, and upon his return, he lay to rest before dinner, saying that he was feeling dizzy; and a few minutes thereafter, his life breath left him and he went to where all must go. It is said that the cause of his death was heart disease.

Duke K. Kahanamoku was born in this town on the 21st of July, 1869, and so he made 48 years old on this past 21st of July. The reason Kahanamoku was named “Duke” is because he was born on the day that the Duke of Edinburgh arrived in Honolulu nei, on that very year and day.

Duke K. Kahanamoku, who died, was employed in the police department here in Honolulu nei under William P. Jarrett as a bicycle officer, recorder of offenses, and sergeant, until he became police captain for an entire watch, and for some unknown reason, Kahanamoku left the police force and began to work once more with William P. Jarret at Kawa as a prison guard.

Duke K. Kahanamoku left behind a wife and six sons and three daughters grieving for him on this side of the dark river [muliwai eleele].

From Ke Aloha Aina, we join the family who are saddened for your loved one, but God will lighten all your burdens, for it is He who creates and He who takes away. It is His will that be done, not that of the children of man.

(Aloha Aina, 8/10/1917, p. 1)

HAALELE MAI O DUKE K. KAHANAMOKU I KEIA OLA ANA

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 32, Aoao 1. Augate 10, 1917.

Duke runs for reelection as sheriff of the city and county of Honolulu, 1936.

Duke Kahanamoku Asks Sheriff Re-election On Basis of Present Record

Kahanamoku, scion of one of the few remaining full-blooded Hawaiian families in the islands, was responsible for returning the sheriff’s office, for the first 25 years of city and county government always held by a Democrat, to the Democratic fold after it had lapsed momentarily into the hands of the Republicans with results that are too well known and too well remembered by every resident of Hawaii to repeat here.

Perhaps the most famous living exponent of the Hawaiian race is Duke P. Kahanamoku, who first spread the name of the Territory over the newspapers and magazines of the world by his swimming prowess and is now seeking re-election as sheriff of the city and county of Honolulu on the Democratic ticket.

For Sheriff

DUKE P. KAHANAMOKU

The Duke first took the world by storm when, and absolutely unknown, he went to the quadrennial Olympic games as one of the American team and made a clean sweep of all the swimming events in which he was entered, establishing several world’s records that stood for many years. He repeated this performance in the following Olympic games and ruled supreme in acquatic affairs until his voluntary retirement from active competition.

On his return to Hawaii the gratitude of the citizens of the Territory was expressed in the form of a public fund which was used to provide a residence for the Kahanamoku family.

The Duke declares in his speeches that he carries on the duties of sheriff of the city and county in the clean and sportsmanlike manner which distinguished his athletic career.

Despite inadequate appropriations provided for the greatly needed new construction at the city and county jail, which is under the jurisdiction of the sheriff’s office, Kahanamoku has established an efficient record in the conduct of this institution—a record on which he is asking renomination at re-election.

“I am a man of few words,” the Duke declares. “When I was representing Hawaii against the best swimmers in the world, I never predicted that I would win any particular race—but I think I won my share. It is the same with the present race for the sheriff’s office.”

[Duke seems to have followed in the footsteps of his father. Duke P. Kahanamoku’s father, Duke K. Kahanamoku served in various positions in the police department, ultimately reaching the rank of captain.]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 9/24/1936, p. 1)

Duke Kahanamoku Asks Sheriff Re-election On Basis of Present Record

The Hawaii Democrat, Volume 9, Number 24, Page 1. September 24, 1936.

Duke saves lives, 1925.

SENT WAS A MEDAL GIFTED TO KAHANAMOKU.

Because of the brave and fearless rescue carried out by Duke P. Kahanamoku, the famous swimming champion of the world, just recently at Newport, California, in saving the lives of eight people from death, he was sent a gift of a medal to honor him, last Wednesday with a letter from Governor Farrington.

The news of this rescue carried out by Duke P. Kahanamoku arrived in this town, therefore,  some people of Honolulu donated a sum of money to purchase a medal to present to him.

This presentation medal was sent along with a letter from the governor to Lorrin Andrews, living in Los Angeles, as the president of the Hawaiian Club of South California [Kalapu Hawaii ma Kalepooni Hema], and from that club the gift will be given to Mr. Kahanamoku.

[I noticed today’s post by Bishop Museum announcing their upcoming exhibit on this hero, Duke Paoa Kahanamoku!]

(Kuokoa, 8/27/1925, p. 4)

HOOUNAIA HE MEDALA MAKANA IA KAHANAMOKU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIV, Helu 35, Aoao 4. Augate 27, 1925.