Mission Houses Museum, 1920.

NEW MUSEUM.

After not being paid attention to for many years, that old house of Levi Chamberlain [Levi Kamalena] in the old missionary lot at the corner of King and Kawaiahao, was spruced up and it is beautiful to see today as it looked when it was first built; it is supplied with office furnishings in preparation of bringing back some old relics of the missionary teachers there. Continue reading

“Aole na ka malihini e ao mai ia’u i ka mooolelo o ko’u lahui…” 1868.

Hawaiian History, by Hawaiians.

The early history of all nations without a literature, is necessarily traditionary. That of the Hawaiians, previous to the advent of the missionaries, is of course derivable from the traditions handed down from father to son, of those families immediately attendant upon the chiefs, known by the term of kahus—literally, body attendants. These body servants constituted a class of themselves, and it was their province not only to wait on the chiefs personally, but to carefully commit to memory and to transmit to their successors, everything connected with the birth and lineage of their lords—quite after the style of the bards and harpers of olden times in Britain. Continue reading

Lorrin Andrews’ Hawaiian language dictionary, 1862.

Kumu Olelo Hawaii.

We are thrilled to hear that the Hawaiian Language Manual being assembled by the esteemed L. Andrews [ka mea Mahaloia L. Aneru]. It is a Book that explains the essence of words, like the haole; only the letter P remains, and then it is finished. There was a great resolution by the Legislature to set aside funds for this endeavor; but not a penny has been given by the Government Treasury. It can be made ready for printing should there be a skilled Hawaiian, and if there is not, it will take about three months before it can be printed. And now, there are many haole who want to know the Hawaiian language; and so too of the Hawaiians, they want to know English; therefore, we believe that it is appropriate that the money is spent on this. Continue reading

Duke saves lives, 1925.

SENT WAS A MEDAL GIFTED TO KAHANAMOKU.

Because of the brave and fearless rescue carried out by Duke P. Kahanamoku, the famous swimming champion of the world, just recently at Newport, California, in saving the lives of eight people from death, he was sent a gift of a medal to honor him, last Wednesday with a letter from Governor Farrington.

The news of this rescue carried out by Duke P. Kahanamoku arrived in this town, therefore,  some people of Honolulu donated a sum of money to purchase a medal to present to him.

This presentation medal was sent along with a letter from the governor to Lorrin Andrews, living in Los Angeles, as the president of the Hawaiian Club of South California [Kalapu Hawaii ma Kalepooni Hema], and from that club the gift will be given to Mr. Kahanamoku.

[I noticed today’s post by Bishop Museum announcing their upcoming exhibit on this hero, Duke Paoa Kahanamoku!]

(Kuokoa, 8/27/1925, p. 4)

HOOUNAIA HE MEDALA MAKANA IA KAHANAMOKU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIV, Helu 35, Aoao 4. Augate 27, 1925.