On Kaao, Mele, and Moolelo, 1869.

Hawaiian Kaaos and Meles.—In the native papers published in Honolulu, there frequently appear old compositions by the native poets and historians, which would be highly interesting if translated. the late Judge Andrews, the the preface to his “Dictionary of the Hawaiian Language,” says, Continue reading

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More on Kamakau’s history, 1868.

History of Kamehameha.—A communication from Mr. Kamakau, the author of the History of Kamehameha, now in the course of publication in the Kuokoa, will be found in our columns. Continue reading

“Aole na ka malihini e ao mai ia’u i ka mooolelo o ko’u lahui…” 1868.

Hawaiian History, by Hawaiians.

The early history of all nations without a literature, is necessarily traditionary. That of the Hawaiians, previous to the advent of the missionaries, is of course derivable from the traditions handed down from father to son, of those families immediately attendant upon the chiefs, known by the term of kahus—literally, body attendants. These body servants constituted a class of themselves, and it was their province not only to wait on the chiefs personally, but to carefully commit to memory and to transmit to their successors, everything connected with the birth and lineage of their lords—quite after the style of the bards and harpers of olden times in Britain. Continue reading

Lorrin Andrews’ Hawaiian language dictionary, 1862.

Kumu Olelo Hawaii.

We are thrilled to hear that the Hawaiian Language Manual being assembled by the esteemed L. Andrews [ka mea Mahaloia L. Aneru]. It is a Book that explains the essence of words, like the haole; only the letter P remains, and then it is finished. There was a great resolution by the Legislature to set aside funds for this endeavor; but not a penny has been given by the Government Treasury. It can be made ready for printing should there be a skilled Hawaiian, and if there is not, it will take about three months before it can be printed. And now, there are many haole who want to know the Hawaiian language; and so too of the Hawaiians, they want to know English; therefore, we believe that it is appropriate that the money is spent on this. Continue reading

Duke saves lives, 1925.

SENT WAS A MEDAL GIFTED TO KAHANAMOKU.

Because of the brave and fearless rescue carried out by Duke P. Kahanamoku, the famous swimming champion of the world, just recently at Newport, California, in saving the lives of eight people from death, he was sent a gift of a medal to honor him, last Wednesday with a letter from Governor Farrington.

The news of this rescue carried out by Duke P. Kahanamoku arrived in this town, therefore,  some people of Honolulu donated a sum of money to purchase a medal to present to him.

This presentation medal was sent along with a letter from the governor to Lorrin Andrews, living in Los Angeles, as the president of the Hawaiian Club of South California [Kalapu Hawaii ma Kalepooni Hema], and from that club the gift will be given to Mr. Kahanamoku.

[I noticed today’s post by Bishop Museum announcing their upcoming exhibit on this hero, Duke Paoa Kahanamoku!]

(Kuokoa, 8/27/1925, p. 4)

HOOUNAIA HE MEDALA MAKANA IA KAHANAMOKU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIV, Helu 35, Aoao 4. Augate 27, 1925.

Lorrin Andrews, “A Dictionary of the Hawaiian Language, to Which is Appended an English-Hawaiian Vocabulary and a Chronological Table of Remarkable Events,” 1865.

Hawaiian Dictionary of Andrews [Anaru].—We were told that this book will be completed next week; one section will be from Hawaiian to English, and the another section from English to Hawaiian, and at the very end is placed a timeline of famous events. This work by Andrews will stand as a monument to him for all times, with generations to come. The book is dedicated to the haole of Honolulu nei, and to the Hawaiians as well.

[This dictionary is indeed useful today, 150 years later! The alphabetization is not done ABC, but AEIOUHKLMNPWBDFGJRSTVZ. Check it out here online at Google Books.]

(Au Okoa, 4/24/1865, p. 2)

Buke Unuhiolelo a Anaru.

Ke Au Okoa, Buke I, Helu 1, Aoao 2. Aperila 24, 1865.

On the passing Gabriel K. Keawehaku, Ka Anela o Mekiko, 1921.

GABRIEL K. KEAWEHAKU PASSES AWAY.

Gabriel K. Keawehaku.

After being ill for the past many months, Gabriel K. Keawehaku left this life at 9 a. m. on the 4th of this month, just outside of his home in Kaimuki, and in the afternoon of the following 5th, his remains were put to rest at the Kaimuki cemetery.

He was given birth to by his parents, Keawehaku (m) and Olaola (f), on the 31st of the month of May, 1867, here in Honolulu, and when he grew weary of this life, he was 54 years old, plus 7 months and 4 days.

He was educated in Honolulu nei during his childhood; he was a kamaaina of this town, performing many jobs, and it was the illness that came upon him that made him give up his different jobs.

He first was employed in his youth in the Metropolitan Meat Market of Waller [Wala] and company. During the monarchy, he lived with King Kalakaua, in the king’s private guards for six years. He served as the customs inspector when the government was transferred under America, being sent to Hilo, and he was customs inspector there for five years. Continue reading