On the passing Gabriel K. Keawehaku, Ka Anela o Mekiko, 1921.

GABRIEL K. KEAWEHAKU PASSES AWAY.

Gabriel K. Keawehaku.

After being ill for the past many months, Gabriel K. Keawehaku left this life at 9 a. m. on the 4th of this month, just outside of his home in Kaimuki, and in the afternoon of the following 5th, his remains were put to rest at the Kaimuki cemetery.

He was given birth to by his parents, Keawehaku (m) and Olaola (f), on the 31st of the month of May, 1867, here in Honolulu, and when he grew weary of this life, he was 54 years old, plus 7 months and 4 days.

He was educated in Honolulu nei during his childhood; he was a kamaaina of this town, performing many jobs, and it was the illness that came upon him that made him give up his different jobs.

He first was employed in his youth in the Metropolitan Meat Market of Waller [Wala] and company. During the monarchy, he lived with King Kalakaua, in the king’s private guards for six years. He served as the customs inspector when the government was transferred under America, being sent to Hilo, and he was customs inspector there for five years. Continue reading

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More on the California Midwinter International Expo, 1894.

More Exhibits.

The Hawaiian Exposition Company will send another large shipment of exhibits to the Midwinter Fair by the Australia next Saturday. Among the things to be sent are native mats and tapa, poi boards and pounders, surf-boards, etc. Apu, the expert surf-rider from Niihau, will be among the twenty-five natives who will go up on the Australia. Mr. and Mrs. J. Ailau will take with them ten native women, who will make leis, fans and hats at the Fair.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 1/5/1894, p. 6)

More Exhibits.

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXIX, Number 2, Page 6. January 5, 1894.

Mild hula ku’i and California Midwinter International Exposition, 1894.

DEPARTING FRIENDS.

The S. S. Australia Carries the Hawaiian Exhibit.

The departure of the S. S. Australia for the Coast was delayed until nearly 1 o’clock on account of the late arrival at the Oceanic wharf of articles to be exhibited at the Midwinter Fair in San Francisco, which has already opened. Among the numerous exhibits to be seen on the steamer were boxes of large and small coffee plants, boxes of large and small tea trees, brought from Hamakua, two wooden tanks containing different varieties of fish, including eels, a small shark, squid and crabs. The last two species were in one tank, and it is believed there will be a circus started between them when the aquarium is shaken up. There were two monster bullocks in stalls lashed near the stern. Kapahee, the famous surf rider, with his board, his wife and son, three hula girls and four other natives comprise part of the Hawaiian exhibit. Kapahee will give exhibitions in surf riding near the Cliff House, and if the water is clear he will dive and kill fish with a spear he has taken with him. He will also ride the bullocks. The girls under the management of D. Kaahanui will dance a mild hula-kui, while the others will assist about the grounds. Mr. L. A. Thurston superintends the exhibit.

Mrs. J. K. Ailau will make a first-class exhibition of Hawaiian curios at the fair in connection with the Hawaiian exhibit. She has taken with her four young ladies to act as saleswomen.

Messrs. Samuel Parker and A. P. Peterson were passengers on the Australia for the Coast on business bent.

Mr. W. P. Boyd, U. S. Vice-Consul-General, and wife were also passengers. They have gone to spend their honeymoon in the States. Both were gaily bedecked with leis and evergreens.

Miss Kate Cornwell, H. A. Widemann, Jr., F. M. Hatch and L. A. Thurston also left.

Mrs. and Miss Gerber, with their friend Miss A. Cahill, who lately returned from the Volcano, were among the departing throng. Mrs. Gerber and daughter left for home after a short and pleasant vacation on the islands.

Nearly all the passengers were covered with Hawaii’s tropical adieu, viz., wreaths and flowers. The P. G. band played previous and up to the departing of the steamer, and the scene on the wharf was one of bustle and excitement.

(Daily Bulletin, 1/6/1894, p. 2)

DEPARTING FRIENDS.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume VII, Number 924, Page 2. January 6, 1894.

More on the missionaries and hula ku’i …and Sweet Emalia, 1894.

CORRESPONDENCE.

[We do not hold ourselves responsible for the opinions or the utterances of our correspondents.]

Morality vs. Speculation.

Editor Holomua.

There is a class or clique of Christian (?) people in our little community who are constantly seeing “the mote that is in their neighbor’s eye, but do not perceive the beam that is in their own eye.” During the past year, that class has written a good deal about the morals of some of their neighbors also have made allusions to improper (?) events of past years.

The debauching hula has been a principal theme of attack. Yet, it may be safely said, that in a number of the “best” society families in this city, the sons and daughters are apt hula kui dancers. “They who live in glass houses should not throw stones.”

What was the scene last Saturday. Three hula dancers¹ went to San Francisco on the Australia, under engagement (presumably) to Mr. L. A. Thurston, who superintends the Hawaiian exhibit at the Midwinter Fair. It is true that the statement has been made that only a mild hula kui will be allowed to be danced. What ridiculousness. Have any of the parties interested ever seen mild hula kui. It has also been stated that the girls have signed a contract for five months.

What spectacle is now seen? The very class who have looked and written upon the Hula as an abomination; for the sake of profit and pecuniary benefit are willing to set aside all feelings of morality and decency, and enter into a contract with girls to use their bodies, so as to be able to offset the dence de ventre and obtain much monetary benefit.

The superintendent of the Hawaiian exhibit is the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, representing the Provisional Government at Washington. SHAME!!!

“Consistency thou art a jewel”—for some people to get.

¹One of these was of course, Emalia Kaihumua.

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/8/1894, p. 3.)

CORRESPONDENCE.

Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 6, Page 3. January 8, 1894.

James Kaulia injured, 1899.

James Kaulia Injured

BY HENRY VIDA AND JACK GIBSON.

Aboard the Steamer Australia is Where This Evil Act Was Done.

Right before the Steamship Australia [Auseteralia] left its mooring, on the evening of this Tuesday, James K. Kaulia was found left below in the storage hold, and because he was found quickly that he was saved, lest he have been taken to San Francisco.

There was no one else other than Kaulia who witnessed him being hurt by Henry Vida and Jack Gibson, but he stated that he was shoved by these haole men and fell. He says that when he took the case of Hansen, the haole that was arrested by Stratemeyer for importing opium, that haole agreed to pay $100 if his charges were overturned, he [Kaulia] agreed, and this Saturday, Hansen was set free.

James Kaulia waited for his lawyer fees. Garvin, a worker aboard the Australia agreed that he’d pay the money, and Henry Vida stood as an intermediary.

But when it grew near to the time when the Australia was to leave, he went to go see Garvin, who told him that he gave the money in the hands of Henry Vida. Henry Vida denied this, and for this reason they all went aboard the ship. Garvin however was not found, for he was busy working.

Half and hour prior to the ship’s departure, Garvin appeared, and he told him [Kaulia] to go up front to the prow, where the sailors were; and as for Vida and Gibson, they went to meet with the purser.

And just a few minutes after that, the two of them suddenly showed with a jug being held by Henry Vida; and they jumped to one side of the opening of the storage, while telling Kaulia to come over to that side, but he refused because he was hesitant about the storage hold.

That was when Gibson pushed him from behind and he fell on the side of the door to the storage, at which point Gibson shoved him again and he fell once more, his hands grabbing on to a corner of the door; then Vida stomped on his ribs and he fell into the room on top of the baggage.

Before Kaulia was able to stand, the entrance to the storage was shut, and he sat there in the dark. However, he sought a way for him to get out, pounding at the door until he was found by a haole who exclaimed that there was a runaway. And officers Halelau and Kaili came to rescue him from his precarious situation. Some parts of his arms were broken when he fell, and in the morning of this Wednesday, he filed a suit against Henry Vida and Jack Gibson for injuring him. The two of them deny harming James Kaulia.

(Aloha Aina, 2/25/1899, p. 2)

HOEHAIA O JAS. K. KAULIA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke V, Helu 8, Aoao 3. Feberuari 25, 1899.

Then from 2/19/1881, “Ko Hawaii Pae Aina” started printing list after list after list of reported cases of smallpox and deaths as a result thereof. 1881.

Reported Cases of Smallpox.

We place below the list of all people who contracted Smallpox and was known to the Board of Health—beginning on the 4th of December 1880, until this past 17th of February 1881:
Dec. 4—Amosalson, from the steamship Australia.
Dec. 10—White, from the steamship Australia.
Dec. 25—Chow Fork, from the steamship Cassandra.
Jan. 3—Gee Sam, from the steamship Cassandra.
Jan. 19—Tah Tin, from the steamship Quinta.
Jan. 24—Cheong Hoy, from the steamship Quinta.
Feb. 2—Chan Pou, Ho Kau, He Sang, Chou Fa, Wong Neet, Su Wah, Tuen Kam, all from the steamship Mei Foo.
Feb. 4—Keawe (female), from Kaopuaua.
Feb. 5—Lono, from Kepohoni; Kealoha (f), from Kaumakapili; Kamala, from Honokaupu; Kaeo, from the grounds of Queen Emma; Wahinelili (f), from Kikihale; Sam Kalalau, Piimoku, Akowana, Kini (f), Kakeo (f), and Kepola (f), from Kaopuaua; Ieke and Nahuina, of Kikihale.
Feb. 6—Pua, from the grounds of Queen Emma; Eliza Crowningburg, from Kikihale; Maikai, Ioba, and Kalamimea (f), from Kaopuaua.
Feb. 7—Paapaina and Hookano, from Honokaupu; Nakaa (f), from Kepohoni; Kaliko (f), from Kaopuaua; G. Lucas, Jr., from Kukui Street; Gibbs, from Queen’s Hospital; Piimoku (f), from Pualoalo; Kahopu (f), from Hamohamo; Namakalele (f), from Kalihi; Amoe (f), from Kalihi Waena.
Feb. 8—Leon Dejean, from Hotel Street; Kane, from Beritania Street; Kamohomoho, from Kahapaakai; Eliza Lucas, from Kukui Street; Hattie Akau, from Beritania Street.
Feb. 9—Miss Saxton, from Hotel Street; Kuanalewa, from Pauoa; Makaimi, from Kepohoni.
Feb. 10—Chinese girl, Kaneohe; Awai, Kailua; Nellie Solomon (f), Kapuukolo; Namahana (f), Kulaokahua. Feb. 11. Jas. Veltman, Beritania Street; Mahoe, grounds of Queen Emma; Kana, Waipio, Ewa; —————, Waimalu, Ewa; Kailianu, Kaumakapili. Feb. 12. Poaimoku, Kepohoni; Hao, Schooner Pauahi. Feb. 13. —————, Waipio, Ewa; Wahinekua (f), Waipake, Kauai; Feb. 14. Kapahi, Waikiki; Ane Nawahineelua, Kikihale. Feb. 15. Ah Chou, from the Chinese steamship Septima; Ah Chung, from the same vessel. Feb. 16. Sam Fong, Ah Fat, from that Chinese steamship. Feb. 17—D. W. Aiwohi, from Kamakela; Kaaea (f), from Kepohoni; Nailima (m), and Kahikona (f), from the grounds of Queen Emma; 1 Chinese, from the steamship Septima.
There are two patients reported from Waianae, one Chinese and one Hawaiian, but we don’t have their names.
From amongst those who came down with the illness, 9 died—2 haole died by suicide [make naauaua?], 1 Chinese, and 6 Hawaiians. The rest are under quarantine.
(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 2/19/1881, p. 2)
NA MAI HEBERA I LOHE IA MAI.

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IV, Helu 8, Aoao 1. Feberuari 19, 1881.