Mafia? 1893.

AN AMERICAN MAFIA.

“The Queen never will be restored to the throne, for she will be shot within 24 hours, and every man who takes office under her will be shot also—we have men secretly sworn to do it.”

Such was the remark made to the writer by a brainless young sprig of the “citizens reserve,” such is the tenor of numerous open threats of the canaille composing the annexation club, the citizens reserve and the American league organizations that pretending to be patriotically American are in fact veritable nests of socialism, fenianism and mafia.

To their shame be it said that these mafias are organized under men calling themselves Americans, men who heretofore have been regarded as respectable and intelligent citizens: Hatch, Castle, Wilder, Jones, Smith, McGrew, Emerson, and so on, whose names will pass into history as knavish pirates in a plot to steal a nation and compel America to receive the stolen goods.

A recent article in the Holomua warned that a wave of insanity had struck Honolulu in accordance with a well known theory of cycles. The malady appears to be growing worse, for certain it is, that all the men and women concerned in the overthrow of the Queen, the terrorism and misgovernment of a P. G. military despotism, and the present display of hostilities against the United States, all act like people demented. Continue reading

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Mild hula ku’i and California Midwinter International Exposition, 1894.

DEPARTING FRIENDS.

The S. S. Australia Carries the Hawaiian Exhibit.

The departure of the S. S. Australia for the Coast was delayed until nearly 1 o’clock on account of the late arrival at the Oceanic wharf of articles to be exhibited at the Midwinter Fair in San Francisco, which has already opened. Among the numerous exhibits to be seen on the steamer were boxes of large and small coffee plants, boxes of large and small tea trees, brought from Hamakua, two wooden tanks containing different varieties of fish, including eels, a small shark, squid and crabs. The last two species were in one tank, and it is believed there will be a circus started between them when the aquarium is shaken up. There were two monster bullocks in stalls lashed near the stern. Kapahee, the famous surf rider, with his board, his wife and son, three hula girls and four other natives comprise part of the Hawaiian exhibit. Kapahee will give exhibitions in surf riding near the Cliff House, and if the water is clear he will dive and kill fish with a spear he has taken with him. He will also ride the bullocks. The girls under the management of D. Kaahanui will dance a mild hula-kui, while the others will assist about the grounds. Mr. L. A. Thurston superintends the exhibit.

Mrs. J. K. Ailau will make a first-class exhibition of Hawaiian curios at the fair in connection with the Hawaiian exhibit. She has taken with her four young ladies to act as saleswomen.

Messrs. Samuel Parker and A. P. Peterson were passengers on the Australia for the Coast on business bent.

Mr. W. P. Boyd, U. S. Vice-Consul-General, and wife were also passengers. They have gone to spend their honeymoon in the States. Both were gaily bedecked with leis and evergreens.

Miss Kate Cornwell, H. A. Widemann, Jr., F. M. Hatch and L. A. Thurston also left.

Mrs. and Miss Gerber, with their friend Miss A. Cahill, who lately returned from the Volcano, were among the departing throng. Mrs. Gerber and daughter left for home after a short and pleasant vacation on the islands.

Nearly all the passengers were covered with Hawaii’s tropical adieu, viz., wreaths and flowers. The P. G. band played previous and up to the departing of the steamer, and the scene on the wharf was one of bustle and excitement.

(Daily Bulletin, 1/6/1894, p. 2)

DEPARTING FRIENDS.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume VII, Number 924, Page 2. January 6, 1894.

More on the missionaries and hula ku’i …and Sweet Emalia, 1894.

CORRESPONDENCE.

[We do not hold ourselves responsible for the opinions or the utterances of our correspondents.]

Morality vs. Speculation.

Editor Holomua.

There is a class or clique of Christian (?) people in our little community who are constantly seeing “the mote that is in their neighbor’s eye, but do not perceive the beam that is in their own eye.” During the past year, that class has written a good deal about the morals of some of their neighbors also have made allusions to improper (?) events of past years.

The debauching hula has been a principal theme of attack. Yet, it may be safely said, that in a number of the “best” society families in this city, the sons and daughters are apt hula kui dancers. “They who live in glass houses should not throw stones.”

What was the scene last Saturday. Three hula dancers¹ went to San Francisco on the Australia, under engagement (presumably) to Mr. L. A. Thurston, who superintends the Hawaiian exhibit at the Midwinter Fair. It is true that the statement has been made that only a mild hula kui will be allowed to be danced. What ridiculousness. Have any of the parties interested ever seen mild hula kui. It has also been stated that the girls have signed a contract for five months.

What spectacle is now seen? The very class who have looked and written upon the Hula as an abomination; for the sake of profit and pecuniary benefit are willing to set aside all feelings of morality and decency, and enter into a contract with girls to use their bodies, so as to be able to offset the dence de ventre and obtain much monetary benefit.

The superintendent of the Hawaiian exhibit is the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, representing the Provisional Government at Washington. SHAME!!!

“Consistency thou art a jewel”—for some people to get.

¹One of these was of course, Emalia Kaihumua.

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/8/1894, p. 3.)

CORRESPONDENCE.

Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 6, Page 3. January 8, 1894.

The Hawaiian Moses? 1893.

“THE MISTAKES OF MOSES.”

We refer, of course, to the Hawaiian political Moses, who has recently broken camp, and set the faithful in motion through sea, desert and wilderness to the Land of Promise, beyond the shadow of the Throne. Yes! We refer to the Hawaiian political Moses, but whether his other name is Dole or Thurston, has not, at this writing, fully transpired. Still, the doubt as to his other name is a merely nominal doubt, not affecting the merits of the case. And as the original state—man of that name was not gifted with immunity from error, so neither has the Hawaiian Moses, even during his very brief pilgrimage, avoided all mistakes. It should ever be the part of a friend to note his friends’ infirmities, and, by bringing them mildly to their authors’ notice, suggest their reform, or convey a warning against their repetition.

———

We are all aware of the high pressure of seeming necessity under which the present government was formed. We can therefore appreciate, to some extent, the causes of the neglect to observe, towards the numerous Native element, those marks of regard and confidence without which no government can hope to endure in Hawaii. We repeat, that the pressure of the occasion must be the excuse of the gentlemen at the head of the movement for their seemingly unfriendly, and even hostile attitude toward the entire Native race, in the ordering of early events under the new dispensation.

———

The exclusion of Hawaiians from a participation in the beneficent project not only seemed, but was, and is complete. There may have been, and no doubt were reasons, seemingly sound to those who adopted them, for such a course,—reasons of which the public cannot judge, because the public know them not. Yet it would seem that one of two propositions must be true; viz.: either the Hawaiians were needlessly, and, therefore, harshly excluded from such participation in the reforming of their own government, or else the entire race were deemed by the leaders to be unfit to participate in such an enterprise.

———

If the former of the above propositions be true, one would naturally expect the mistake to be rectified at the earliest opportunity. That it has not been rectified would seem to stamp it as having been no mistake, but a course deliberately adopted, for, note the opportunity to retrieve the error, (if error it had been thought to be) in the filling of the four vacancies in the Advisory Council, on the 21st inst. It was then, as seems to us, the manifest duty of the government to seek out and appoint to those vacancies, men of Hawaiian blood, whose brains, interests and loyalty to the new idea bespoke than as deserving of such honor and confidence.

———

The failure of the government to attempt to bring even one Hawaiian to a seat at the Council Board is susceptible of only one of two meanings:—1st, that no Hawaiian could be found possessing those qualifications, or, 2nd, that the government were determined to ignore and exclude them, in any event.

———

If such exclusion was premeditated and malicious, the less said of it the better, as it is self-condemnatory. If on the other hand, there be no native Hawaiian fit to occupy a seat in the government councils, with what degree of candor or confidence can the Provisional Government request of expect the United States to incorporate our country into itself? What a commentary upon that request is the action of the government itself, in thus excluding from their confidence the entire aboriginal race, more completely than the Mongolian is now excluded from the Union. Forty odd thousand Hawaiians on these shores, and not one, (in the opinion of the government,) entitled or qualified to have a voice in the government of his native land. What a text for the American enemies of annexation, and how they will use it!

(Liberal, 1/25/1893, p. 2)

"THE MISTAKES OF MOSES."

The Liberal, Volume I, Number 39, Page 2. January 25, 1893.

Here is the amendment to the marriage law passed in 1888.

MOKUNA LXIX.

HE KANAWAI

E hoololi ai i ka Pauku 2 o ka Mokuna LVI o ke Kanawai Hoopai Karaima, a e hoopau loa ai i na Pauku 3, 4 a me 5 o ia Mokuna, me na hoololi a pau i ua Mokuna nei.

E hooholoia e ka Moi a me ka Ahaolelo o ko Hawaii Paeaina.

Pauku 1. E hoololi ia a ma keia ke hoololi ia nei ka Pauku 2 o ka Mokuna LVI o ke Kanawai Hoopai Karaima, a penei e heluhelu ia ai:

“Pauku 2. E ninaninau ia, e hoolohe ia, a e hooholo ia e ka Lunakanawai no ia hihia, a ina he mea hiki e hoopau ia ka noho kue ana o laua; aka, ina aole hiki e hoopau ia ko laua kue ana, e hoopau wale ia no ka hoopii. Ina e hoopau wale ia kekahi hoopii, e hooholo ka Lunakanawai e hookaa ia na koina e like me ka mea ana i manao ai oia ka pono.”

Pauku 2. Ma keia ke hoopau loa ia nei na Pauku 3, 4 a me 5 o ka Mokuna i olelo ia  a me kekahi a me na hoololi o ia Mokuna i olelo ia.

Apono ia i keia la 10 o Sepatemaba, M. H. 1888.

KALAKAUA REX.

Na ka Moi:

L. A. Thurston,

Kuhina Kalaiaina.

(NA KANAWAI O KA MOI KALAKAUA I, Ke Alii o Ko Hawaii Paeaina, i Kau ia e ka Hale Ahaolelo Kau Kanawai, i ke Kau o 1888, p. 171.)

CHAPTER LXIX.

AN ACT

To amend Section 2 of Chapter LVI. of the Penal Code and Repeal Sections 3, 4 and 5 of said Chapter with all Amendments thereto.

Be it Enacted by the Kind and the Legislature of the Hawaiian Kingdom:

Section 1. That Section 2 of Chapter LVI. of the Penal Code be and is hereby amended so as to read as follows:

“Section 2. Said Justice shall examine into, hear and determine the complaint and shall secure if practicable, a reconciliation between the parties; but if no reconciliation can be effected, the complaint shall be dismissed. In case of such dismissal the Justice shall adjudge the costs to be paid as in his opinion justice shall demand.”

Section 2. Sections 3, 4 and 5 of said Chapter and any and all amendments thereof be and are hereby repealed.

Approved this tenth day of September, A. S. 1888.

KALAKAUA REX.

By the King:

L. A. Thurston.

Minister of the Interior.

(Laws of His Majesty Kalakaua, King of the Hawaiian Islands: Passed by the Legislative Assembly at its Session 1888, pp. 157–158.)

Woah. This is some story! Hawaiian living abroad comes home to visit… after 38 years. 1915.

THAT HAWAIIAN RETURNS TO SEE HIS HOMELAND ONCE MORE.

JOHN BELL WILSON

After leaving Honolulu thirty-eight years ago, that Hawaiian, John Bell Wilson is his name, returned to see once again his family and homeland while he was still in good health, on the steamship Matsonia this past Wednesday, filled with shock at how the places he was familiar with in his childhood had changed.

John Bell Wilson left Honolulu nei when he was a youngster of twenty-three years in age on a sailboat, because there were few steamships in his day, but it was upon a beautiful steamship that he returned to see the land of his birth and his friends, as he was shocked at the change of Honolulu from an almost nothing town which he left to a beautiful town which one admires.

His eyes met up with new sights of Honolulu and ethnicities which were unfamiliar to him; and as he travelled here and there, there were no friends who he knew in his youth, except for but a few who were still living which he met up with, those friends who he went around with in those days gone by.

Heard of the Death of His Mother

When John Bell Wilson returned to see his homeland, he had one big thing on his mind, that was meeting affectionately with his mother, who he thought was still living, but she was not, and this left him heartbroken.

Mr. Wilson was depressed at the death of his mother, being that from the time he left this land until his return, he did not write his mother; and when he asked his friends when he landed ashore about his mother, this was when he was told she had passed long ago to the other side, three years ago.

He went immediately to find the grave where his mother was laid to rest, and he planned to build a memorial to her, as a show of remembrance from a thoughtless child for his beloved mother.

Not Recognizing Honolulu

According to the words of Mr. Wilson after he saw the scenery unfamiliar to him, he could not recall the old Honolulu, because the town had changed so much from when he left, however he did have recollections of the major streets of town.

When he travelled about looking here and there, those scenes were not familiar to him, except for just a few people who went around with him and played with him in the days of his childhood. The small children he left behind were now very elderly and some of them had white hair.

Some of the familiar people who he saw on the first day he

(See page four.)

(Kuokoa, 2/5/1915, p. 1)

HULI HOI MAI IA KANAKA HAWAII E IKE HOU I KA AINA HANAU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 5, 1915.

RETURNED TO THE HOMELAND

(From page one.)

stepped once again on the soil of Hawaii, were J. K. Kamanoulu and East Kahulualii who work at the newspaper printing office.

In the days of his childhood, he went often to the old Kaumakapili Church, and he was enrolled at Lahainaluna School, and according to him, C. P. Iaukea is one of his friends who is still living.

Became Wealthy in a Foreign Land

When he left the land of his birth, he got off at Sutter County, California, and there he sought very hard until he became well off.

He married his wife, and they currently have five grown children, and he provided a good home for his family. He is the one who supplies the market of Sacramento with fish and meat, and he also makes profits from the farming industry.

Kalakaua was the King of Hawaii nei at the time he last saw Hawaii, and Lorrin A. Thurston was but a child.

There are many people from Hawaii who have met up with him in California, and in the year 1891, in the town of San Francisco, he met with King Kalakaua there, and they dined together, drank and talked, and just a few days after that was when King Kalakaua died.

Did Not Forget His Mother Tongue

Mr. Wilson is now sixty-one years old, so he was living thirty-eight years abroad, and he has not forgotten his native language, he is still fluent in Hawaiian, just as the people here are.

According to him, he will spend three months staying in Hawaii before returning to his family who await him.

(Kuokoa 2/5/1915, p. 4)

HULI HOI MAI I KA AINA HANAU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 6, Aoao 4. Feberuari 5, 1915.