More on the missionaries and hula ku’i …and Sweet Emalia, 1894.

CORRESPONDENCE.

[We do not hold ourselves responsible for the opinions or the utterances of our correspondents.]

Morality vs. Speculation.

Editor Holomua.

There is a class or clique of Christian (?) people in our little community who are constantly seeing “the mote that is in their neighbor’s eye, but do not perceive the beam that is in their own eye.” During the past year, that class has written a good deal about the morals of some of their neighbors also have made allusions to improper (?) events of past years.

The debauching hula has been a principal theme of attack. Yet, it may be safely said, that in a number of the “best” society families in this city, the sons and daughters are apt hula kui dancers. “They who live in glass houses should not throw stones.”

What was the scene last Saturday. Three hula dancers¹ went to San Francisco on the Australia, under engagement (presumably) to Mr. L. A. Thurston, who superintends the Hawaiian exhibit at the Midwinter Fair. It is true that the statement has been made that only a mild hula kui will be allowed to be danced. What ridiculousness. Have any of the parties interested ever seen mild hula kui. It has also been stated that the girls have signed a contract for five months.

What spectacle is now seen? The very class who have looked and written upon the Hula as an abomination; for the sake of profit and pecuniary benefit are willing to set aside all feelings of morality and decency, and enter into a contract with girls to use their bodies, so as to be able to offset the dence de ventre and obtain much monetary benefit.

The superintendent of the Hawaiian exhibit is the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, representing the Provisional Government at Washington. SHAME!!!

“Consistency thou art a jewel”—for some people to get.

¹One of these was of course, Emalia Kaihumua.

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/8/1894, p. 3.)

CORRESPONDENCE.

Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 6, Page 3. January 8, 1894.

More on the missionaries, 1894.

Missionary Descendants Show Their Knowledge of Hula Ku’i.

In the Advertiser of 2/7/1894, was shown that at New Haven, United States of America, on the past 17th of January 1894, there was held a party to commemorate the anniversary of the government by the P. G. Those present were: J. R. Kauka [James Robert Judd?], G. S. Walakahauki [George S. Waterhouse], C. M. Kuke [C. Montague Cooke, Jr.?], W. D. Balauina [William D. Baldwin], A. M. Atherton, A. S. Knudsen, J. A. Waila [James Austin Wilder], H. A. Balauina [Harry A. Baldwin], and F. Hastings.

Before drinking to the delight at the Cabinet of Ministers of Cleveland, the young missionaries danced a hula ku’i to a hapa haole song. When the music started, the youths among them who knew how to hula ku’i jumped up immediately and danced and started to sway! …the mixed poi of Poniuailana goes the limit; there you go!—answer the call!—…¹

KE MELE HULA-KUI.

Kaulana mai nei o Mr. Cleveland,
Anti-Annexation no ia ia,
Ua olelo Cleveland i Mr. Willis,
E hele ana oe e Honolulu,
Aia hiki ana oe malaila,
E kipaku oe i ka P. G.
A komo oe Liliuokalani,
Maluna o kona throne!”
Ua hai mai Peresidena Dole,
E noho oe Malie”
Pilikia loa no Alapaki Willis,
E hoka no o Mr. Cleveland.

A MELE HULA KU’I

Famed is Mr. Cleveland,
An Anti-Annexationist is he,
Cleveland said to Mr. Willis,
[“]You are going to Honolulu,
When you get there,
Banish the P. G.
And place Liliuokalani,
Upon her throne!”
President Dole spoke,
[“]You just sit still.”
Albert Willis is perplexed,
Mr. Cleveland is thwarted.

The adeptness at the hula ku’i by these missionary descendants was seen first hand here in Honolulu, along with the girls carrying ukulele.

There you go! Mixed up is the cultivated taro with the wild! The white is smeared; the black gets the score.

What is this S. E. Bishop!—Look to New Haven! Your people’s hula ku’i dancer descendants were  gyrating away!

You missionaries, don’t be hypocritical.

¹…kuupau na ai hoowali o Poniuailana; o—ia!—e, o!—…

[Does anyone have more information on the “Kuupau na ai hoowali o Poniuailana” phrase?]

(Nupepa Ka Oiaio, 2/9/1894, p. 3)

Hoike na Mamo Mikanele i ko lakou ike hula-kui.

Nupepa Ka Oiaio, Buke VI, Helu 6, Aoao 3. Feberuari 9, 1894.