More on the California Midwinter International Expo, 1894.

More Exhibits.

The Hawaiian Exposition Company will send another large shipment of exhibits to the Midwinter Fair by the Australia next Saturday. Among the things to be sent are native mats and tapa, poi boards and pounders, surf-boards, etc. Apu, the expert surf-rider from Niihau, will be among the twenty-five natives who will go up on the Australia. Mr. and Mrs. J. Ailau will take with them ten native women, who will make leis, fans and hats at the Fair.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 1/5/1894, p. 6)

More Exhibits.

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXIX, Number 2, Page 6. January 5, 1894.

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Mild hula ku’i and California Midwinter International Exposition, 1894.

DEPARTING FRIENDS.

The S. S. Australia Carries the Hawaiian Exhibit.

The departure of the S. S. Australia for the Coast was delayed until nearly 1 o’clock on account of the late arrival at the Oceanic wharf of articles to be exhibited at the Midwinter Fair in San Francisco, which has already opened. Among the numerous exhibits to be seen on the steamer were boxes of large and small coffee plants, boxes of large and small tea trees, brought from Hamakua, two wooden tanks containing different varieties of fish, including eels, a small shark, squid and crabs. The last two species were in one tank, and it is believed there will be a circus started between them when the aquarium is shaken up. There were two monster bullocks in stalls lashed near the stern. Kapahee, the famous surf rider, with his board, his wife and son, three hula girls and four other natives comprise part of the Hawaiian exhibit. Kapahee will give exhibitions in surf riding near the Cliff House, and if the water is clear he will dive and kill fish with a spear he has taken with him. He will also ride the bullocks. The girls under the management of D. Kaahanui will dance a mild hula-kui, while the others will assist about the grounds. Mr. L. A. Thurston superintends the exhibit.

Mrs. J. K. Ailau will make a first-class exhibition of Hawaiian curios at the fair in connection with the Hawaiian exhibit. She has taken with her four young ladies to act as saleswomen.

Messrs. Samuel Parker and A. P. Peterson were passengers on the Australia for the Coast on business bent.

Mr. W. P. Boyd, U. S. Vice-Consul-General, and wife were also passengers. They have gone to spend their honeymoon in the States. Both were gaily bedecked with leis and evergreens.

Miss Kate Cornwell, H. A. Widemann, Jr., F. M. Hatch and L. A. Thurston also left.

Mrs. and Miss Gerber, with their friend Miss A. Cahill, who lately returned from the Volcano, were among the departing throng. Mrs. Gerber and daughter left for home after a short and pleasant vacation on the islands.

Nearly all the passengers were covered with Hawaii’s tropical adieu, viz., wreaths and flowers. The P. G. band played previous and up to the departing of the steamer, and the scene on the wharf was one of bustle and excitement.

(Daily Bulletin, 1/6/1894, p. 2)

DEPARTING FRIENDS.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume VII, Number 924, Page 2. January 6, 1894.

More on the missionaries and hula ku’i …and Sweet Emalia, 1894.

CORRESPONDENCE.

[We do not hold ourselves responsible for the opinions or the utterances of our correspondents.]

Morality vs. Speculation.

Editor Holomua.

There is a class or clique of Christian (?) people in our little community who are constantly seeing “the mote that is in their neighbor’s eye, but do not perceive the beam that is in their own eye.” During the past year, that class has written a good deal about the morals of some of their neighbors also have made allusions to improper (?) events of past years.

The debauching hula has been a principal theme of attack. Yet, it may be safely said, that in a number of the “best” society families in this city, the sons and daughters are apt hula kui dancers. “They who live in glass houses should not throw stones.”

What was the scene last Saturday. Three hula dancers¹ went to San Francisco on the Australia, under engagement (presumably) to Mr. L. A. Thurston, who superintends the Hawaiian exhibit at the Midwinter Fair. It is true that the statement has been made that only a mild hula kui will be allowed to be danced. What ridiculousness. Have any of the parties interested ever seen mild hula kui. It has also been stated that the girls have signed a contract for five months.

What spectacle is now seen? The very class who have looked and written upon the Hula as an abomination; for the sake of profit and pecuniary benefit are willing to set aside all feelings of morality and decency, and enter into a contract with girls to use their bodies, so as to be able to offset the dence de ventre and obtain much monetary benefit.

The superintendent of the Hawaiian exhibit is the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, representing the Provisional Government at Washington. SHAME!!!

“Consistency thou art a jewel”—for some people to get.

¹One of these was of course, Emalia Kaihumua.

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/8/1894, p. 3.)

CORRESPONDENCE.

Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 6, Page 3. January 8, 1894.

More on the California Midwinter International Exposition from Bila Kanealii, 1894.

The Midwinter Exposition.

J. S. Keawe, one of our officers in the uplands of Kalihi writes that he received the news below about the Winter Exposition being held, from a letter of March 17th by Bill Kanealii from San Francisco: From amongst the new things at the Fair to be seen by the visitors, there is a huge wheel that is 180 feet tall with 18 boxes all around, with each box holding 10 people. Another is the tower with a very tall steeple 300 feet high. The lake is another thing of high esteem; it is stocked with all sorts of fish, with 100 pipes feeding water into the lake with all kinds of water, so many that the visitor would not be able to count them all. The merry-go-round [melekolauna] (a thing that spins), is a quarter mile long travelling around until reaching the place where it starts from. The Hawaii display is the best of all. There are two days that the proceeds are the highest, that being Saturdays and Sundays, where $1,000 or more is the most and $500 or more is the least.

(Makaainana, 4/2/1894, p. 3)

Ka Hoikeike Hooilo-Kuwaena.

Ka Makaainana, Buke I—-Ano Hou, Helu 14, Aoao 3. Aperila 2, 1894.

James B. Pakele reports from San Francisco, 1894.

Behold California, a Land of Cold.¹

J. U. Kawainui,

Aloha oe,

Here I am in California in good health. This is a very cold land, but there is always something new, there is no night here; the nights are like days.

These past few days, I have almost travelled all around the town; I went to visit the sugar refinery of the Millionaire², the place where they build warships, the place where money is minted, and the place where the soldiers drill (the Pressido [Presidio]).

I was at the Cliff House this past Thursday, it is a place that many visitors travel to, I saw the animals of the sea, but that place was very cold. After that, I went to the New City Hall and I spent almost a day visiting the various offices; it is a large structure perhaps eight times the size of Iolani Palace.

There are many poor people here with no place to sleep, and there are also many rich people.

PERTAINING TO THE GREAT EXHIBITION.

I went into the different exhibition halls of the Fair, so astonishing to see; there were all kinds of beautiful things.

I was in Alameda County, a large building, and within it, there was every variety of fruit.

Arizona Indian Building is the exhibition hall of the Indians [Ilikini]. There I saw their way of dancing; their dress is fine, but their dancing isn’t great.

I went into the building of hand crafts and saw the making of the clothes that we wear and so forth, and the exhibition hall of all kinds of animals. This week, one of the handlers was killed, mauled by a lion; the reason for this was the the lights went out when the handler was sweeping inside, at which point it jumped and tore at him. I saw the blood and the suit which is placed out as a display in the pen; today there was a service over his dead body. All the people in the fair attended the funeral, the Hawaiian youths sang in Hawaiian, “In Jesus’ Hands” [“Ma ko Iesu mau lima.”] .

The most highly attended thing is the display of Kilauea in Hawaii; the haole men and women are very taken by Hawaiian things, but above all is the hula kui; all the time is filled with hula kui.

There are two bands constantly playing in the Park, but they aren’t good like the Hawaiian boys; I am always being asked by many people if I will be attending the college that John Wilson³ is attending; I have a letter urging me to go there (Stanford University).

James B. Pakele.

San Francisco, February 17, 1894.

¹”Ike ia Kaleponi he Aina Anu” hearkens back to the mele “E Nihi ka Hele”.

²Spreckels Sugar Company of Claus Spreckels, known here as the Ona Miliona [Millionaire].

³See more on John Henry Wilson in Men of Hawaii.

[For related articles and information, see the previous posts, and the posts soon to come as well! Oh… and coincidentally, i noticed i recently posted James B. Pakele’s death announcement from 1913. He died at Queen’s Hospital on January 30.]

(Kuokoa, 3/3/1894, p. 1)

Ike ia Kaleponi he Aina Anu.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIII, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Maraki 3, 1894.

Probably the earliest known version of a song well known today, 1894.

ALOHA O HAWAII.

He aloha Hawaii moku o Keawe
Aina a ka nani me ka maluhia
Hookuku au me Kaleponi
Hawaii ka oi o na Ailana
Na Ausekulia i kono mai ia’u
E naue i ka aina malihini
Aina kamahao i ka’u ike
Ua uhi paapu ia e ka noe
Ike i ka hau hookuakea i ka ili
Hoopumehana i ke ahi kapuahi
Ka iniki a ke anu me he ipo ala
E koi mai ana ia’u e hoi
Ilaila hoi hope ko’u manao
He kaukani mile ko’u mamao
Hu mai ke aloha no ka aina
No ka poi uouo kaohi puu
Haina ia mai ana ka puana
Ke aloha aina ko’u lei ia

Emalia Kaihumua.

Hale Hoikeike Hawaii. Kapalakiko

[This was written while Emalia Kaihumua was performing at the Hawaiian Exhibit [Hale Hoikeike Hawaii] at the California Midwinter International Exposition held in San Francisco. Looking back at was happening at the time in her homeland while she was “a thousand miles away”, it is very heart wrenching to see the many references to home and returning and finally the haina: “Let the refrain be told, Patriotism is my lei.”]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 4/27/1894, p. 3)

ALOHA O HAWAII.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 929, Aoao 3. Aperila 27, 1894.