Coastal change in Hilo, 1871.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.: Hawaii”]

The coral point of Kaipalaoa is filled with sand.—During the month of November past, and on into this month, that place was filled up with sand, and this was not so for many years in the past, according to the old-timers of Hilo nei. Continue reading

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News out of Lahaina, 1867.

From Lahaina.

Pertaining to the Queen.—Queen Emma has returned from her tour of Wailuku on this past Tuesday evening of May, and it was at 8 o’clock that she reached here in Lahaina. She was accompanied by the distinguished ones of the valley shade [ka malu hekuawa], and she returned with her attendants who went along, His Ex. P. Nahaolelua, Col. D. Kalakaua, Hon. P. Y. Kekuaokalani, Hon. A. M. Kahalewai and Mrs. Kalakaua.

Exhibit of paintings.—This past Thursday night, there was a great exhibit of illustrations at the School of the English Mission; there were many portraits shown that night, all of Hawaii’s Alii; and we admired all of the paintings, and they were done with skill; in attendance as well was the Queen.

A Party.—On the evening of Thursday, Reverend G. Mason held a party to honor the Queen, and those who were instructed, and everything carried out at the party was gracious, and the tables were laden with things of all sorts, and we ate until satiated, and a most was leftover. Continue reading

Papa holua found in Hookena by Napoleon Kalolii Pukui, 1905.

SLED OF A CHIEFESS

On the 6th of last month, N. K. Pukui, traveling agent of the Hawaiian Realty and Maturity Co., while on a tour of the Island of Hawaii, found the above illustrated sled in a cave at Hookena, Hawaii.

It is said that the oldest kamaainas of Hookena have heard from their parents and grandparents that sometime in the reign of King Keawenuiaumi, about two hundred and fifty years ago, a high chiefess named Kaneamuna [Kaneamama] was the living at Hookena. Her principal amusement was hee holua (coasting on a sled) and hee nalu (surfing).

She had her people make a sliding ground for her on a hill just back of the little village of Hookena, and ordered a sled, or land toboggan, called a papa holua, as well as a surfing board, or a papa hee nalu. When the slide was finished she passed many pleasant hours sliding down the steep hill. This slide was composed of smooth stones covered with rushes. After her death her sled and surf board disappeared, and the secred of their hiding place was never revealed.

It is believed the sled and board found in the cave belonged to the High Chiefess. They are made of the wood of the bread-fruit tree and at the present time are in very good condition. The cocoanut fiber ropes are still attached to the sled.

(Advertiser Photo.)

ANCIENT HAWAIIAN SLED FOUND IN A KONA, HAWAII, CAVE.

[See also the Hawaiian-Language article found in Ka Na’i Aupuni, 12/6/1905, p. 2.]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 12/6/1905, p. 5)

SLED OF A CHIEFESS

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLII, Number 7279, Page 5. December 6, 1905.

George Freeth and Dan Miller to teach surfing in Los Angeles, 1907.

Here are two young men from Honolulu considering going to Los Angeles with a canoe and surfboard to demonstrate the people Hawaii’s entertainment of canoe surfing and board surfing, should the Promotion Committee give their approval to pay for their travelling expenses. George Freeth and Dan Miller are the names of these boys.

(Aloha Aina, 5/4/1907, p. 8)

Eia he mau kanaka opio...

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XII, Helu 18, Aoao 8. Mei 4, 1907.

George Freeth awarded for saving lives, 1910.

GEORGE FREETH RIDING A SURFBOARD.

AWARDED FOR SAVING LIVES.

Because a haole that is a kamaaina in Honolulu named George Freeth saved the lives of seven Japanese fishermen, he was honored by the Legislature of Hawaii with a gold medal on the 1st of August.

The value of the gold medal is about a hundred and fifty dollars, and upon it is written words speaking of the haole saving the Japanese fishermen on the 16th of December, 1908. Continue reading

More on the California Midwinter International Expo, 1894.

More Exhibits.

The Hawaiian Exposition Company will send another large shipment of exhibits to the Midwinter Fair by the Australia next Saturday. Among the things to be sent are native mats and tapa, poi boards and pounders, surf-boards, etc. Apu, the expert surf-rider from Niihau, will be among the twenty-five natives who will go up on the Australia. Mr. and Mrs. J. Ailau will take with them ten native women, who will make leis, fans and hats at the Fair.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 1/5/1894, p. 6)

More Exhibits.

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXIX, Number 2, Page 6. January 5, 1894.