Moon calendar and Kanepuaa, 1953.

Moon Calendar

Tomorrow, June 27, will be Mahealani, the 16th of the moon month Kaaona.

Mahealani is a good planting day. The Hawaiian farmer in ancient days who had a new field of potatoes would rise with the dawn to go into his garden and pray to Kanepuaa, the god of fertility. Continue reading

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New Year 2015.

Here is a small makana to everyone who checks in on this blog every once in a while. Just like last year, this is a calendar fashioned after one given by the newspaper Aloha Aina in 1906 to its subscribers. Click on the image and download the pdf file. You should be able to enlarge it to print even on poster-size paper if you want. Feel free to make copies and give it out to anyone you think will appreciate it!

Hauoli Makahiki 2015!

The mirage of Limaloa, 1885.

WITNESSED THE VILLAGE OF LIMALOA

O Ko Hawaii Pae Aina newspaper,

Aloha oe:—Please allow your patience to let me shake hands with your captain and the metal typesetting boys.

At dawn, 2 o’clock, on the Wednesday of the 1st of July, the night of Laau Pau in the reckoning of the Hawaiians. We left Waimea and the motion of our cars were driven straight for Lolomauna, where we would stay and watch for the building of the village [kauhale] of Limaloa, and we settled back for the rest of the night and the morning; it was a 6 o’clock. Our eyes looked quietly down at the beautiful flat plains of Limaloa spread silently before us,  hoping to see the famed magical kauhale (Limaloa), but we did not. 7 o’clock passed by and there was no sign of what we were hoping to see, and 7 minutes thereafter, the plains of Limaloa began to change; they were shrouded in different colors: red, yellow, and green, and glittered like gold, and it moved from the sea upland, and amongst the coconut trees that were standing. And from there it went on until the edge of the salt beds, headed towards Mana like an ocean wave crashing upon the surface of the sea.

Continue reading

Two gifts in one, 2014.

Are you looking for the special gift for someone near or far? When you pick up calendars from the Hawaiian Historical Society, you are giving two gifts in one—a calendar for your loved one, and a donation to the Historical Society as well!

The Hawaiian Historical Society’s Hawaiian history calendar for 2015 is now available. The new calendar features historical photographs of outstanding sites in Hawaiʻi state parks on Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Maui, and Hawaiʻi Island. Many of the places that are now part of the park system have long attracted residents and visitors alike. The photographs chosen for the calendar exemplify the scenic beauty and unique natural features that have made these locales favored destinations for many decades.

Hawaiian Historical Society
Iao, one of the scenes from the 2015 calendar.

The photographs in the calendar were gleaned from the collections of the Hawaiian Historical Society, the Hawaiʻi State Archives, the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, the Kauaʻi Historical Society and the Hawaiian Mission Children’s Society Library. They date from the1860s through the late 1930s. image: January 2015 calendarAs always, the calendar’s pages are filled with notes about significant dates and interesting facts in Island history as well as the phases of the moon. They are great solutions for seasonal gift-giving quandaries.

Society members can purchase copies of the calendar for $8.00 each (plus $3.00 postage when mailed to you). The retail price is $10 per calendar. Bulk rates are available. The calendars can be obtained directly from the Hawaiian Historical Society office at 560 Kawaiahaʻo Street, Honolulu, HI 96813. Telephone (808) 537-6271. Look for them at the annual HHS open house and book sale December 11.

The 2015 Hawaiian history calendar is also available at the following book and gift shops: Native Books at Ward Warehouse; the Mission Houses Gift Shop; the Hawaii State Art Museum Gift Shop; and Kailua General Store.

For more information, see the Hawaiian Historical Society web page!