Old kii found, 1873.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

An Old God Idol.—When a well was being dug [kohi] at Captain Adams’ place in Kalihi, a wooden god idol was found which was 18 inches long. It is an ugly kii, Continue reading

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The discovered kii and A. L. Atkinson, 1899.

AN HAWAIIAN RELIC

A Valuable Idol Recently Discovered in an Ewa Rice Field.

Mr. A. L. Atkinson is now the owner of a valuable Hawaiian relic. In digging in one of the rice fields several days ago in the Ewa district of this Island, an idol was discovered buried in the mud. A picture of it is given above in three phases—the front, the side and the back. It stands a little over five feet high, and is not like any other idol known. Continue reading

G. W. E. Kupele responds to Kanepuu’s question on the Kanepuaa plant, 1857.

Pertaining to the Kanepuaa Plant

O Hae Hawaii

Aloha oe:—I saw in the Hae Hawaii, Issue 19, the thought of J. H. Kanepuu. Asking the oldsters who know of the plant of Kanepuaa. The thing that will increase food and fish according to him, if the plant of Kanepuaa is gotten.

Here below is the response. The other day, I asked some oldsters with knowledge of the plant of Kanepuaa. They answered, it is not an actual plant like the plants of the medical kahuna [kahuna lapaau]. But it is a kind of worship by the name of Kanepuaa. Continue reading

On sacred stones, 1921.

THE STONE FISH GODDESS “MALEI” TO BE RETURNED TO MAKAPUU

Hawaiians have not forgotten the story about the stone goddess called “Malei,” a stone deity cared for and worshiped by the Hawaiian fishermen in the olden days; the great fish that the stone deity always brought to shore was the uhu, as is seen in the story of Hiiaka:

“Aia la o ka uku kai o Makapuu,
He i’a ia na Malei na ka wahine e noho ana i ka ulu a ka makani,
I Koolau ke ola i ka huaka’i malihini,
Kanaenae a Hiiaka i ka poli o Pele,
E Malei e, i halekipa ke aloha, e uwe mai!’

[There are the uhu of Makapuu which swim in procession,
Fish of Malei that dwells in the rising winds,
In Koolau lies the sustenance for the unfamiliar travellers,
Hiiakaikapoliopele prays,
O Malei, welcome us in love; let us weep!]

Continue reading