Death of William A. Kiha, 1899.

W. A. KIHA—GONE ON THE ROAD OF NO RETURN.

We received news from Maui, reporting that William A. Kiha, one of the educated Hawaiians of the Archipelago, has left this life on a day last week.

Most of the old time Honolulu people as well as some young ones will not forget about WIlliam A. Kiha, teacher of the Independent School of English at the church of Kaumakapili. It was at that school that he served as teacher along with his brother Enoka Kalauao. There are many who became proficient at English being taught by William A. Kiha. The current editor of this newspaper [Joseph M. Poepoe] sought knowledge of English under him, at the school of Kaumakapili, for short periods of time. Continue reading

On Kalaipahoa, 1931.

POISON GOD BURNED

Hilo, Hawaii, July 6, 1931.

Editor, The Star-Bulletin.

Sir: In your issue of July 4, 1931, there appears a picture of an old Hawaiian wooden idol  under which it was stated that it was believed to be the poison-god Kalaipahoa. Continue reading

Fishponds seen on travels around Molokai, 1893.

[Found under: “Huakai Makaikai i ka Mokupuni o Molokainui a Hina.”]

FISHPONDS.

When I travelled from Kawela to Pukoo, it was perhaps ten or so miles, I saw 30 or more fishponds [loko ia] in the ocean, set apart by rock walls like the ponds at Kualoa, Koolau, Oahu. Some of the ponds I saw were almost a mile long. They [the walls] were five feet tall and four feet wide. Continue reading