Clarice B. Taylor on Koihala, part VI, 1949.

LITTLE TALES

All About Hawaii

By Clarice B. Taylor

KO’IHALA HELPS RAISE THE OHIA LOG

There was an unusual stir and bustle among the men of the Kau district on the day they assembled to lift the great oohia log up over the walls of the new heiau at Makanau upon orders from their chief, Ko’ihala.

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This great log,  hauled with much labor and misery from the forest area on Mauna Loa, was to be carved into the image of Ko’ihala’s protecting god.

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The men assigned to the work were in a very jovial mood. It was the first day they had not grumbled since the early days of the heiau construction. Continue reading

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Commemorating Hawaii’s role in WWI, 1919.

THIS IS THE STATUE SCULPTED BY BURNHAM TO COMMEMORATE THE MILITARY SERVICE OF HAWAIIANS IN THE WAR.

In the middle is the commemorative statue for Hawaii’s part it took in the war that was sculpted by the sculptor Roger Noble Burnham. This is that statue that is intended to be placed outside of Kapiolani Park in the area set aside for it by the legislature.

This is the Memorial that Hawaii wanted to stand for all times, something for the people to look upon. On one side of the sculpture is a war leader, and on the other side, a Hawaiian girl. Beneath this is a soldier on one side and a sailor on the other side.

(Kuokoa, 5/16/1919, p. 1)

Kuokoa_5_16_1919_1.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 20, Aoao 1. Mei 16, 1919.

Robert Moffitt, collector of “curiosities”, 1863.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Stone Image [Akua Kii] of the olden days.—We have recently seen a stone image of a stone god of Hawaii nei, from ancient times. It is said that it is one of the famous kupua of Manoa. It is three feet tall, and has a lei around its neck; it is finely carved, and its appearance is similar to that of Hawaiians. It was taken however to Kahuku by R. Moffitt, Esq. [R. Mofita Esq.], perhaps as a companion to the kii that is at his place, whose name is Kioi. For that gentleman has a liking for curiosities [mea kupanaha].

[Might anyone know what became of this collection?]

(Kuokoa, 5/2/1863, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke II, Helu 18, Aoao 2. Mei 2, 1863.

Treasures spread across the four corners of the earth? 1906.

Auction Sale

Tourists! Collectors!

Thursday, Feb. 1, 1906,

10 O’CLOCK A. M.,

At my salesroom, 847 Kaahumanu Street, I will sell, under instruction from the Administrators of the Estate of

MARY AILAU

the eminent Hawaiian collector, the following ancient and other relics of

Ancient Chiefs

Pig Platters,

Calabashes,

Cocos (Calabash Nets),

Tapas,

Stone Adzes,

Stone Lamps,

Mike Stones,

Poi Pounders,

49 Fans,

2 Kauila Aumakuas (War Spears),

2 Hula Drums (Ancient),

1 Idol—Kukaili-iki—One of Kamehameha’s War Gods,

1 Ipu Hula (Gourd Drum),

1 Pawehe Calabash,

1 Pawehe Water Bottle,

1 Newa (War Club),

2 Bamboo Cushions,

1 Hinai Opae,

2 Samoan War Clubs,

1 Koko (Ancient),

1 Black Kapa (Burial),

1 Lauhala Hall Mat,

7 Samoan Cocoanut Bowls,

1 Lauhala Bag,

1 Case Stuffed Hawaiian Birds,

1 Aumakua,

1 Kauila Kahili Stick,

1 Kahili Stick (Tortoise) and Ivory (Ancient),

2 Emu Eggs,

1 Carved Coco Bank,

1 Large Show Case,

4 Lei Hulus (Native Birds),

1 Samoan War Club,

1 Moss Album.

JAMES F. MORGAN,

AUCTIONEER.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 1/29/1906, p. 8)

Auction Sale

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, XLIII, Number 7324, Page 8. January 29, 1906.

Another stone kanoa, 1900.

AN AMAZING AWA BOWL.

Brought over by Jim Davis, the supercargo [kupakako] of the steamer Upolu, was a stone awa bowl that has a god image [kii akua] on its side. It is estimated to be 150 years old. This kanoa was found in the earth of Halikiki, Kona, Hawaii, a few feet underground. It was found when the land was being worked to plant coffee, and some people said there was a house foundation there in the olden days. There are many who say that a kanoa carved out of stone is very rare, and that most seen to this day are made from wood. This kanoa will be taken to the Bishop Museum after the one who it belongs to gives his consent.

[There was also this story on a stone kanoa at the Museum. And this did not i hear make its way to the Bishop Museum…]

(Aloha Aina, 6/9/1900, p. 6)

HE KANOA AWA KUPANAHA

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke VI, Helu 23, Aoao 6. Iune 9, 1900.