More on the kii from Waialua, 1866.

Hawaiian Idol.—A genuine idol of the olden time, has recently been discovered at Waialua, Oahu, by Mr. Lane. Through the permission of His Excellency ex-Governor Kekuanaoa, this idol has been presented to the Museum of Oahu College [Punahou]. It is about eight feet in length, and resembles the ancient images represented in Jarvis’ History. Mr. Chase has had this idol sketched by Mr. Emmert, and very soon photographs will be on exhibition. Many hundreds of Hawaiians have gathered to see this huge image while it was set up in front of the Kuokoa office, at the Sailors’ Home, Honolulu. Continue reading

Stone image is found, and half a story is not a whole story! 1847.

Thing of the olden days awakened.

On the past 31st of March, I heard there were some people searching  for the stone image, and the name of that stone is Kanepohakaa. These are the names of the people, Palaha and Nawaiahu. Nawaiahu went to get Palaha. He said, “Get…

(Elele, 8/7/1847, p. 70)

Elele_8_7_1847_70

Ka Elele, Buke 3, Pepa 9, Aoao 70. Augate 7, 1847.

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Kalaipahoa, and “Hawaiian Art,” 1941.

HAWAII’S WOODEN GODS GOOD POLYNESIAN ART

Huc M. Luquiens Appreciates Carved and Feathered Deities of Ferocious Mien and Lost Symbolism

By LORIN TARR GILL

“If we were forced to choose a single specimen to represent the characteristic art of Polynesia, it might well be one of the extraordinary wooden gods of Hawaii,” Huc Luquiens, assistant professor of art at the University of Hawaii, asserts in his paper on “Hawaiian Art,” soon to be published by the Bishop museum. Continue reading

On Kalaipahoa, 1931.

POISON GOD BURNED

Hilo, Hawaii, July 6, 1931.

Editor, The Star-Bulletin.

Sir: In your issue of July 4, 1931, there appears a picture of an old Hawaiian wooden idol  under which it was stated that it was believed to be the poison-god Kalaipahoa. Continue reading