John Wind enrolls into Wailuku Theological School, 1866.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

A foreigner learning to become a pastor.—In a letter secretly received by one of us, the writer said that an Indian enrolled in the Wailuku Theological School, and that he is a stranger. His name is Ioane Makani. We have admiration for the great desire of this stranger to gain knowledge of the occupation of a pastor, and it would appear that he will most definitely return to teach his Indian People who live wild in the forests of America.

[John Wind is reported to have attended Royal School. And from there it seems he was admitted to the preparatory department of Oahu College, as per a PCA 8/26/1858, p. 2 article.]

(Kuokoa, 7/7/1866, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Iulai 7, 1866.

Kamehameha Day, a Hundred Years Ago, 1922.

The Day of the Nation Conqueror, Kamehameha I.

This coming Sunday, the 11th of June, is Kamehameha Day. This day is regularly celebrated as the birthday of the Nation Conqueror Kamehameha I here in Hawaii. And this regular celebration is what we will do this year.

It is a usual thing for all the Hawaiian associations to hold a memorial service for the one for whom this important holiday is, on the Sunday preceding the 11th of June. But this year that day falls on a Sunday, so it is appropriate that the memorial activities be carried out with sincerity and maturity by us this year.

Continue reading

No fun to be had on the Sabbath, 1874.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

—On this past Sunday, some haole boys went to surf at the surf spot of Uo at noon of that day, and some people told the sheriff to arrest them; he responded that it was fine, and that there was no law against surfing on Sunday. We believe that if surfing is a pleasurable activity, then there is indeed a law against it.

(Kuokoa, 7/18/1874, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIII, Helu 29, Aoao 2. Iulai 18, 1874

Rev. William Kamau, oldest minister in the Hawaiian church, 1940.

[Found under “Aloha Pumehana”]

REV. WILLIAM KAMAU

He is the oldest amongst the ministers of Hawaii’s Churches.

The Haili Church gives its warm aloha to you, oh good father, and so too with Ka Hoku o Hawaii.

[Rev. William Kamau was one of the contributors to Bishop Museum’s Roberts Collection of mele. See this week’s He Aupuni Palapala blog for more information on a new exhibit about the collection and an better image of William Kamau!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/19/1940, p. 1)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 8, Aoao 1. Iune 19, 1940.

Death of Anna Maria Dimond, 1893.

Death of Kaimana Wahine.

In the evening of this past Monday, at the hour of 7:30, Mrs. Anna Maria Dimond let go of her breath, the aged companion of this life of Mr. Henry Dimond, at the age of 85.

She was born in the city of New York on the 19th of May, 1808. She married Henry Dimond on November 3, 1834, and landed in Honolulu in June [6,] 1835, along with Titus Coan [Koana] and Edwin Oscar Hall [Holo] folks. With the death of E. O. Hall, the Dimonds were the only ones left from those who came on the same journey here. Continue reading

Death of Pilipo Naone, John K. Naone’s father, 1882.

PILIPO NAONE.

On the 16th of February past, Naone let out his last breath, and the man returned to his Lord whom he loved greatly, for whom he was a servant in many good works; Naone died at eighty or so years old. He was born up in Pauoa. His father was Mahi and his  mother was Hama [?? it is hard to read]; his parents were from Kauai and then resided in Pauoa; these parents had three children: Pokaakua, along with P. Naone and D. Lima; Pokaakua and Lima died ealier, and only Naone lived until old age, living for more than 80 years. Continue reading

More on the kii from Waialua, 1866.

Hawaiian Idol.—A genuine idol of the olden time, has recently been discovered at Waialua, Oahu, by Mr. Lane. Through the permission of His Excellency ex-Governor Kekuanaoa, this idol has been presented to the Museum of Oahu College [Punahou]. It is about eight feet in length, and resembles the ancient images represented in Jarvis’ History. Mr. Chase has had this idol sketched by Mr. Emmert, and very soon photographs will be on exhibition. Many hundreds of Hawaiians have gathered to see this huge image while it was set up in front of the Kuokoa office, at the Sailors’ Home, Honolulu. Continue reading

Queen Elizabeth yesterday brought to mind the good Samaritan, 2020.

Ka Samarita Lokomaikai.
Pauku Baibala, Luka 10:25–37.

25 Aia hoi, ku ae la iluna kekahi kakaolelo e hoao ana ia ia, ninau aku la, E ke kumu, heaha ka’u e hana’i i loaa mai ai ia’u ke ola mau loa?

26 A ninau mai la oia ia ia, Heaha ka mea i kakauia’i iloko o ke kanawai? Pehea kau heluhelu ana?

27 Hai aku la ke kakaolelo, i aku la, E aloha aku uoe i ka Haku i kou Akua me kou naau a pau, a me kou uhane a pau, a me kou ikaika a pau, a me kou manao a pau, a i kou hoalauna e like me oe iho. Continue reading

A mele composed by William A. Kiha for La Kuokoa, 1876.

HE HIMENI NO KA LA KUOKOA.

[This is a song that will be sung by the school children at the church of Kaumakapili on that day that our Independence was recognized.]

La hauoli keia no kakou a pau,
La Kuokoa—e
Kou Hae nani e Hawaii Ponoi,
E mau aku kou welo ana i na kau a pau loa.

Cho.—Hae nani, Hae nani o Hawaii nei,
E mau aku kou welo ana.
Ma na la nui, la Kuokoa,
Huro no ka Hae Hawaii. Continue reading