A mele for Harry Naope, the pride of Hawaii Island, 1920.

HE MELE NO HARRY NAOPE.

Kaulana mai nei a o Naope,
Ka uwila i anapu ma ke kapitala,
Na ke kelekalapa i ha’i mai,
Lawe oe i ka hae o ka lanakila;
Kilakila no oe i ka’u ike,
Ka moho kaulana puni Hawaii. Continue reading

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The new Makua Church, 1921.

THIS IS THE PICTURE OF THE NEW CHURCH OF MAKUA, WAIANAE, BEING BUILT.

THE NEW CHURCH OF MAKUA BEING BUILT

Mr. Solomon Hanohano, Editor of the Kuokoa. Aloha:—Please allow me some open space in your newspaper, the Kuokoa, to insert this little clarification pertaining to the Makua Church. Along with this letter is a picture of the new church being built these days that I want you to also place in the paper with this announcement.

The main reason for this announcement is this: In the month of August, we made a number of monetary requests, and the members, friends and intimates joined and gave their assistance to Makua for this great endeavor, with the approval of the secretary of the Hawaiian Board. Continue reading

On sacred stones, 1921.

THE STONE FISH GODDESS “MALEI” TO BE RETURNED TO MAKAPUU

Hawaiians have not forgotten the story about the stone goddess called “Malei,” a stone deity cared for and worshiped by the Hawaiian fishermen in the olden days; the great fish that the stone deity always brought to shore was the uhu, as is seen in the story of Hiiaka:

“Aia la o ka uku kai o Makapuu,
He i’a ia na Malei na ka wahine e noho ana i ka ulu a ka makani,
I Koolau ke ola i ka huaka’i malihini,
Kanaenae a Hiiaka i ka poli o Pele,
E Malei e, i halekipa ke aloha, e uwe mai!’

[There are the uhu of Makapuu which swim in procession,
Fish of Malei that dwells in the rising winds,
In Koolau lies the sustenance for the unfamiliar travellers,
Hiiakaikapoliopele prays,
O Malei, welcome us in love; let us weep!]

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Mrs. Ellen Lake Kahalekai passes, 1916.

A REMEMBRANCE OF MRS. KAHALEKAI.

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:—Please insert in an empty space of your newspaper for my dearly beloved wife who left in the night, that being Mrs. Ellen Lake Kahalekai, on the 30th of October, 1916.

She was born at Kipahulu, Maui on the 6th of July, 1881, and her parents were William Lake and Hana Kunukau Lake; and she was cared for in Waihee until she was grown, until she went to school in Waihee.

We attended the same school for many years, and she was educated for a short time at the old Maunaolu School.

She was one of the beautiful rose buds that blossomed there. We were married by Rev. Kapu at Waihee on the 14th of March, 1899, and we lived in Spreckelsville for three years, and we had one of our daughters on the 10th of March, 1900. Continue reading

Mrs. Keanookalani Miriama Dudoit passes on, 1916.

My Dearly Beloved Wife Has Gone

At 9:30 p. m. on Friday, Dec. 8, 1916, my dearly beloved wife left me and the family. My dearly beloved wife had an open heart for all who visited her home, she was patient, and lived honorably. She was a woman who had aloha for her husband and family.

She was a pastor for the Hoomana Naauao church, the faith that she labored for at all times; and the first president of the Kalama Society [Ahahui Kalama] established in the year 1907, and she rose to honorary president until she left the Society of which she constantly lauded everyday, and according to what my dearly beloved said to me, “When I die, my Society will honor my funeral, and the funeral over the remains of my dearly beloved was held at the mortuary of M. E. Silva at 3:15 p. m. on Sunday, Dec. 10. The Kalama Society did not march in the funerary procession of my dear wife. Auwe for those without aloha and of their cruelty. Continue reading

One year after Pearl Harbor, 1942.

This Makes a Full Year

Monday last was a year since the bombing of Puuloa by the those who carried out the coup and stole the lives of people thinking that is what will give them victory.

The 7th of December is a day we probably will never forget for all times, for while the navy and the land of America were enjoying their time, the raider carried out his work which was planned ahead of time, to fly to America to the path of Puuloa, and let down messengers of destruction to cripple the condition of the military of the United States of America.

With America being secretly attacked, that served as a needle poking at the side of the Americans like a spur [kui ke-pa] being thrust into the underside of a horse.

In response to these actions by the raider and assassin, the one who stirred the coals that are burning in the hearts of true Americans, and it became something that inflamed the thoughts of Americans. Continue reading

Timoteo Haalilio, 1845.

SOME THINGS PERTAINING TO HAALILIO.

Koolau, Oahu, was where he was born; his parents were prominent people. His father died when he was a youth, and thereafter his mother (that being Eseka who is still living) became Governor of Molokai. When he was 8 years old, he joined the family of the King, Kamehameha III, and lived with them. They were at Hilo at this time. When he was 13, Haalilio entered the school of Bingham [Binamu] in Honolulu, and he studied English and…

(Elele, 4/25/1845, p. 13)

Elele_4_25_1845_13.png

Ka Elele, Buke I, Pepa 2, Aoao 13, Aperila 25, 1845.

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