More on the kii from Waialua, 1866.

Hawaiian Idol.—A genuine idol of the olden time, has recently been discovered at Waialua, Oahu, by Mr. Lane. Through the permission of His Excellency ex-Governor Kekuanaoa, this idol has been presented to the Museum of Oahu College [Punahou]. It is about eight feet in length, and resembles the ancient images represented in Jarvis’ History. Mr. Chase has had this idol sketched by Mr. Emmert, and very soon photographs will be on exhibition. Many hundreds of Hawaiians have gathered to see this huge image while it was set up in front of the Kuokoa office, at the Sailors’ Home, Honolulu. Continue reading

Walking around Honolulu, 1853.

HONOLULU IN 1853.

Oftentimes it is difficult to picture what places looked like and where they were situated. This paper appearing in Thrum’s Hawaiian Almanac and Annual for 1898 by Warren Goodale and supplemented by Thomas G. Thrum is an interesting read because it show buildings of old Honolulu from lithographs (in the collection of the Hawaiian Historical Society) done by Paul Emmert, and describes locations of the buildings.

[One of yesterday’s posts mentioned Kalakaua boarding a skiff makai of Halemahoe, which appears in this paper as Hale Mahoe. Luckily this volume and most years of Thrum’s Almanac and Annual are available online. For this particular article, click on the image below.]

Paul Emmert Lithograph No. 1

“HONOLULU IN 1853.” Hawaiian Almanac and Annual for 1898, pp 80-104.