Thrum’s Valentines ad, 1887.

Valentines. Valentines.

The finest variety of Valentines ever opened up in Honolulu, are now on sale at

Thos. G. THRUM’S,
Book and Stationery Store, 106 Fort Street,
At prices ranging from

Five Cents up to Five Dollars

—EACH.—

Representing—PRANG’S Valentine Novelties, HEILDSHEIMER’S Fringed goods, MARCUS WARD’S Cards.

McLOUGHLAN’S Sentimental and Comic Supplies, and THOMPSON’S Comicalities, Slim Jims and Double Folders.

—ALSO—

VALENTINE PAPETERIES

First comers have choice of selection. Quick or you lose them.

Valentine’s Day February 14. Monday Next.

[Five dollars???]

(Daily Herald, 2/12/1887, p. 3)

DailyHerald_2_12_1887_3.png

The Daily Herald, Volume I, Number 140, Page 3. February 12, 1887.

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Swimming trophies brought home by the Hawaii boys, 1913.

HAWAII SWIMMERS BROUGHT HOME “THE BACON”

Yesterday and today a good-sized crowd gathered about the window of Thrum’s book store, on Fort street, admiring the cups and medals brought back by the Hawaii swimmers. The lion’s share of these are the property of Duke Kahanamoku, who now has a large enough collection of gold medals to start a jewelry store.

In the above picture, the cups, from left to right, are for the rough water swim at Redondo; the Indoor Yacht Club cup, for the team making the greatest number of points at the San Francisco meet; the cup presented to W. T. Rawlins, manager of the Hui Nalu team by Charles Y. Williamson of the British Empire Club, and Al Coney of the South End Rowing Club; and the relay cup, won at San Francisco by the Hui Nalu team.

The medals are for first prize in the 50, 100, 220, 440 yard, and the 50 yard back stroke, won by Duke at San Francisco; second prize in the back stroke, won by D. Kaupiko; third prize in the half mile, won by Frederick Wilhelm; a gold medal presented by the Los Angeles Athletic Club to Duke; and a first prize medal won by Duke at the Los Angeles Swimming Association meet.

The trophy presented to W. T. Rawlins is a handsome loving cup, which was given the local man at the Stewart Hotel just before the team left San Francisco.

[I wonder if we will be able to see any of these at the upcoming Duke exhibit at the Bishop Museum!]

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 7/22/1913, p. 9)

HAWAII SWIMMERS BROUGHT HOME "THE BACON"

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XX, Number 6643, Page 9. July 22, 1913.

Walking around Honolulu, 1853.

HONOLULU IN 1853.

Oftentimes it is difficult to picture what places looked like and where they were situated. This paper appearing in Thrum’s Hawaiian Almanac and Annual for 1898 by Warren Goodale and supplemented by Thomas G. Thrum is an interesting read because it show buildings of old Honolulu from lithographs (in the collection of the Hawaiian Historical Society) done by Paul Emmert, and describes locations of the buildings.

[One of yesterday’s posts mentioned Kalakaua boarding a skiff makai of Halemahoe, which appears in this paper as Hale Mahoe. Luckily this volume and most years of Thrum’s Almanac and Annual are available online. For this particular article, click on the image below.]

Paul Emmert Lithograph No. 1

“HONOLULU IN 1853.” Hawaiian Almanac and Annual for 1898, pp 80-104.

Hawaiian Historical Society established, 1892.

THE HAWAIIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

On the evening of Dec. 28th, a few of our citizens met and engaged in an informal interchange of ideas in regard to the importance of forming an Historical Society. Prof. Alexander was chosen temporary chairman, and the Rev. Dr. Hyde secretary. It was then decided that the proper time had come for the organization of such a society, and a committee composed of Prof. Alexander, Rev. Dr. Hyde and Mr. J. S. Emerson was chosen to draft a constitution. An adjourned meeting was held last Monday evening at the Honolulu Library, at which this committee made its report. A large number of our most prominent citizens attended, and much interest was shown in the formal organization of the new society. After the adoption of the constitution the following officers were unanimously elected: President, Hon. C. R. Bishop; Vice-President, Mr. J. S. Emerson; Corresponding Secretary, Hon. W. D. Alexander; Recording Secretary, Rev. Dr. C. M. Hyde: Treasurer, Mr. T. G. Thrum. The constitution states that the object of the society is “the collection, study, and utilization of all materials illustrating the Ethnology, Achæology and History of the Hawaiian Islands.” Active members are to pay an initiation fee of five dollars and an annual fee of one dollar. It is hoped that arrangements will be made by which the society will secure as its permanent quarters, for the accommodation of its prospective library and a place of meeting, the large front room of the Honolulu Library. Immediate efforts are to be made for the formation of a library which shall include all books relating in any way to this Kingdom, and all books, pamphlets and newspapers ever printed on the Hawaiian Islands. Continue reading

Astronomy, 1909.

The Hawaiian Astronomy.

It is a great pity that David Malo, the Hawaiian Historian and Antiquarian, did not preserve in his “Moolelo Hawaii” or Hawaiian Antiquities, some account on Ancient Hawaiian Astronomy. S. M. Kamakau, a contemporary of David Malo, and also a writer on the Ancient History of Hawaii nei, is little better off, about this matter than his colleague. He wrote an article on “Instructions in Ancient Hawaiian Astronomy” and was published in the Nupepa Kuokoa of Aug. 5th, 1865. It was translated into English by Prof. W. D. Alexander for Maile Wreath (Lei Maile), and was republished by Mr. Thos. G. Thrum, in his “Hawaiian Annual” for 1890.

In the year 1885, we found in the monthly newspaper, “Ka Hoku o ke Kai,” that subject was treated again, only to last a very short time. And about twelve or thirteen years ago we again found certain very valuable statements pertaining to the Ancient History of Hawaii by Kanalu, said to be the priestly ancestor of the priesthood or order of Kanalu.

We saw in “The Journal of the Polynesian Society,” Vol. XVI, No. 2, an article on “Tahitian Astronomy” by Miss Teuira Henry. It treats the “Birth of the Heavenly Bodies.” It is very interesting.

In order to preserve these accounts relating to Hawaiian Astronomy, we give our English translation here, starting first from the account in Ka Hoku o ke Kai (1885).

In ancient times, the class of people studying the positions of the moon, the rising and setting of certain fixed stars and constellations, and also of the sun, are called the kilo-hoku or astrologers. Their observations of these heavenly bodies might well be called the study of astronomy. The use of astrology anciently, was to predict certain events of fortunes and misfortunes, victory or defeat of a battle, death of king or queen, or any high chief; it also foretells of pestilence, famine, fine or stormy weather and so forth.

The old Hawaiians knew some names of certain planets and several constellations. The names of planets are somewhat slightly different in corresponding English names, rendered by Andrews, Alexander and the late Dr. Bishop.

HAW. NAMES OF PLANETS ANDREWS. ALEXANDER. BISHOP.
1 Ukali Mercury Mercury Mercury
2 Hokuao
Hokuloa Venus Venus Venus
Mananalo
3 Holoholopinaau Mars Saturn Mars
4 Kaawela Venus (an evening star) Jupiter Jupiter
5 Naholoholo Saturn (See No. 3) Saturn

The Hawaiian name for Mars according to Prof. Alexander is Hokuula (red star). In the newspaper “Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika,” published about the year 1860, the name for the planet Saturn was Makalii, Kauopae for Jupiter and Polowehilani for Mars.

(To be Continued)

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 4/2/1909, p. 2)

The Hawaiian Astronomy.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke VII, Helu 14, Aoao 2. Aperila 2, 1909.

Statistics galore and useful information, 1875–1947.

If you haven’t heard of Thrum’s Hawaiian Almanac and Annual, check this out! And if you didn’t know that it is available online, here it is. This long running yearly publication contains a wide range of general information all in one place, and it can come in handy. Mahalo to the good folks at Hamilton Library’s Hawaiian Collection (5th floor) for putting up this helpful page!

About Thrum’s and About This Guide

HAWAIIAN ALMANAC AND ANNUAL FOR 1875.

First page of the first “Hawaiian Almanac and Annual”.

A newspaper called, “Lunalilo” 1873.

[Found under: “DOMESTIC NEWS”]

“Lunalilo” Newspaper.—We have seen a newspaper of eight sides, in the English language, with the name, “Lunalilo,” which was printed at one of the Printing Houses of this town. Its size is about the size of the Alaula, and on the first page of the paper is printed with a silhouette [kii hoolele aka] of the King, and the inside is filled with good ideas, the speeches of the King, and some other things pertaining to the election of the King, as well as some short stories about the various Kamehameha. It is ready for sale at the bookstores of Whitney [Wini] and Kalamu [Thrum].

[This is documented in the great four-volume Hawaiian bibliography by David Forbes, “Hawaiian National Bibliography, 1780-1900”]

(Au Okoa, 1/30/1873, p. 3)

"Lunalilo" nupepa.

Ke Au Okoa, Buke VIII, Helu 42, Aoao 3. Ianuari 30, 1873.