Walking around Honolulu, 1853.

HONOLULU IN 1853.

Oftentimes it is difficult to picture what places looked like and where they were situated. This paper appearing in Thrum’s Hawaiian Almanac and Annual for 1898 by Warren Goodale and supplemented by Thomas G. Thrum is an interesting read because it show buildings of old Honolulu from lithographs (in the collection of the Hawaiian Historical Society) done by Paul Emmert, and describes locations of the buildings.

[One of yesterday’s posts mentioned Kalakaua boarding a skiff makai of Halemahoe, which appears in this paper as Hale Mahoe. Luckily this volume and most years of Thrum’s Almanac and Annual are available online. For this particular article, click on the image below.]

Paul Emmert Lithograph No. 1

“HONOLULU IN 1853.” Hawaiian Almanac and Annual for 1898, pp 80-104.

King Kalakaua leaves for America, 1874.

The Alii, the King, boarded the battleship Benecia at 10 oʻclock and 30 minutes on the morning of this past Tuesday [11/17/1874] to go to the United States of America. When he reached the wharf, seaside of Halemahoe, it was an awesome sight; the seeing off by his subjects of the King on his travels to foreign lands. The people crowded together to shake his hand, give gifts, kiss his hand, and chant his name songs, but the King did not dawdle. When the skiff came by for him, accompanied by the Prince Regent [Kahu Aupuni] and the attendants, the sailors of the battleships Tenedos, Scout, and Benecia climbed the yard, and as the skiff moved on, the battery of Ainahou and the two British battleships each gave a 21 gun salute,— Continue reading