Travels of Lydia Kamakaeha Dominis, 1871.

[Found under: “NU HOU  KULOKO.”]

Pertaining to the island of Hawaii.—This past Monday, one of our beloved mistresses, the Honorable Mrs. Lilia Kamakaeha Dominis, Continue reading

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Birthday of Kamehameha IV, 1862.

Orders of the General
[Kauoha Alihikaua]

1. This coming Sunday, the 9th of this month, is the birthday of King Kamehameha IV; therefore, it is commanded that at 8 o’clock that morning, the Hawaiian Flag will be raised at Punchbowl [Puowaina], and at the residence of the Honorable M. Kekuanaoa, the Governor, and on the other Flag Poles of the Nation. All of the Flags will be taken down at sunset that day.

Because the birthday of the King will fall on a Sunday, therefore, the celebration of the King’s birthday will be postponed until the following Monday, that being the 10th.

2. The Hawaiian Flags will again be raised, as was stated above. 21 guns will be shot off at the rising of the sun, and at 12 noon, and also at the setting of the sun.

3. All of the Military Officers and the King’s personal Guards are to wear their gold-trimmed uniforms [kapa kula] and their swords. The Officers shall be smartly uniformed until sunset.

By the order of the General.

John O. Dominis.
Adjutant General [Akukana Kenelala].

War Department [Keena Kaua],
Feb. 5, 1862.

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 2/6/1862, p. 3)

HokuoHawaii_2_6_1862_3

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika, Buke I, Helu 20, Aoao 3. Feberuari 6, 1862.

More on the transfer of the remains of the Alii to Maunaala, 1865.

Just as we announced in last week’s issue of our paper, that there would be a funeral for the Minister of Foreign Affairs [Kuhina o ko na Aina e], it was indeed carried out. After the night prayer [pule poeleele] of the Anglican Church [Halepule Hoomana Enelani] was over, the body of R. C. Wyllie was taken from his residence at Nuuanu to the Church at Peleula, where it was left until the funeral procession to his permanent home, that being on a following day.

When the sun reached its heights, the military boys were seen crowded together in the grounds of the Palace. The Cavalry [Puali Koa Kaua Lio] under Captain C. H. Judd, the Artillery Division [? Koa Pukaa] under Captain J. H. Brown, the regular soldiers [? Koa ku mau] under Captain Kahoohuli, the Hulumanu Division [Koa Hulumanu] under Captain J. M. Kapena, the Rifle Squad [Koa Raifela] under Captain Hassinger. From the Palace, they moved on to the Church, and there many people of all sorts who waited with great hope that they would take part in the procession taking him to be left in peace where we all must go with no delay when fetched by the heartless ruler of the pit.

After the prayer for him was over, a procession was organized by the Marshall for the day, John O. Dominis, and the procession marched quietly to the Royal Cemetery at Maunaala. Most of the businesses were closed that day, and everyone went to watch the funeral procession; the sides of the streets were filled with men, women, and children. When the remains entered the Cemetery, and right after, the troops and the artillery division sounded their guns for him. However before his funeral, the Fort at Puowaina shot off minute guns until he was at the Cemetery.

It was as if while the group of onlookers watched him being taken away, all of the people were were reeling with painful sorrow in their hearts. Who would not be without aloha, for he lived until well known in the calm of Hauola, and should he have had a partner, he would have had many grandchildren, but he lived alone and did not multiply in the uplands of Kawananakoa. He has gone, but has left a Monument for himself, not in the city, or on the side of the streets of our town, but on the sides of the history of our Nation, and in the hearts of this generation, and all of the generations to come. When he entered the Tomb, the crowd scattered and went back with a heavy heart.

After the sun returned to the surface of the sea, another funeral was readied, and that funeral to move to a new place our

Alii’s Remains,

and here are their names below, as is written on their coffins:

(1) Jane Lahilahi Kaeo, Died Jan 12, 1862, Aged 50 years.

(2) T. C. Byde Rooke, F. R. C. S. Born May 18, 1806, Died May 28, 1858.

(3) Keoni Ana, Born on the 12th of March, 1810, Died July 18, 1857.

(4) B. Namakeha, Died 27 Dec. 1860, At 52 years of age.

(5) John William Pitt Kinau, Born Dec. 27, 1842, Died on the 9th of Sept. 1857.

(6) Elisabeta Kaahumanu, Born 1793, Died 1842.

(7) Kamehameha 2d, Elii no nahina o Awhai, Make i Pelekani 28 Makaiki Kaiku, I ke mahoe mua o Kamakaiki 1824, Aloha ino no komako Elii Iolani.
Kamehameha 2nd King of the Sandwich Islands, Died July 14th, 1824, In London, in the 28th year of his age, May we remember our beloved King Iolani.

(8) Kamehamalu Elii no na aina o awahi, Make i Pelekani, 22 ma Raiki Teitu, London 8 Re mahoe o Re ma Raiki 1824.
Tamehamalu, Queen of the Sandwich Islands, Departed this life in London on the 8 July 1824, Aged 22 years.

(9) Kaahumanu II died Apr. 4, 1839 in Her 33rd Year.

(10) In this casket is the daughter [? son] of Kamehameha III, Keaweaweulaokalani; there is nothing inscribed on the casket.

(11) Kamehameha III, born on the 17th of March 1813, Died 15th December 1854, He reigned for 29 years.

(12) His Highness, Albert Edward Kauikeaouli, Leiopapa a Kamehameha, Haku o Hawaii, Born on the 27th of May, 1858, died on the 27th of August, 1862. Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not, for of such is the Kingdom of God.

(13) Alexander Kalanikua Liholiho, Iolani Maka o Iouli Kunuiakea, Kukailimoku, Kamehameha IV, King of the Hawaiian Islands. Born Feberuary 9, 1834, succeeded to the Throne, December 15, 1854. Died November 30, 1863.

(14) Mose Kekuaiwa, Born July 20, 1829, Died November 29, 1848.

(15) Davida Tamehameha, Born on May 20, 1828, Died December 15, 1835. He was 7 years, 6 months, and 16 days old.

(16) Leleiohoku, Born March 21, 1821, Died October 21, 1848.

(17) A. Paki, Born Aug. 1808, Died June 13th, 1855.

(18) L. Konia, Wife of A. Paki, Born 1808, Died July 2nd, 1857.

(19) Keolaokalani Paki Bishop, Born Dec. 30, 1862, Died Aug. 29, 1863.

(20) Kamanele, Died May 7, 1831, at 19 Years of Age.

(21) Liloa and Lonoikamakahiki.

When the stifling rays of the sun left, and when the dim moon shown over the peaceful town, the torches glowed red, lighting up the bones of the Alii as they were carried on palanquins [manele], to lie and be placed in the new building made with fine craftsmanship for their physical remains, for they returned to the eternal home of this life, death snatching without compassion, and dragged them off without a cry [?? ke ka-ua aku] being heard.

Death, according to one poet, is something terribly frightening. This is true; we understand that death is something very awesome, because it is not known where it will come, from the lowly hovel to perhaps at the door of the Palace.

“Ka ilihune, ka poe waiwai,
Ka poe kiekie, a me ka poe haahaa,
Na ka make e hoiliwai like ia lakou.”

[“The poor, the rich,
The high, and the low,
Death makes them all equal.”]

Death is something regular, everyday we hear the ringing of the funerary bells, and we always are witness to the funerary processions cloaked in mourning clothes, following after their friends to his resting place—the grave. As these people are taken away, we look—and each of them go to our occupations in this life; some look for their fortune, while other for fame, and glory. But when are Alii are taken away, trapped by the tireless hands of death, we all unassumingly consider, looking back upon the history of his life, and weigh.

“Ina ua kupono ia no ka lani i ka lani,
Ina aole ia i kupono nolaila, i Gehena.”

[“If befitting for heaven, then to heaven,
If not befitting for there, then to hell.”]

[See more on the Nanea Armstrong-Wassel’s instagram post here.]

(Au Okoa, 11/6/1865, p. 2)

E like me ka makou mea i hoolaha aku ai...

Ke Au Okoa, Buke I, Helu 29, Aoao 2. Novemaba 6, 1865.

Wailuku and Lahaina get new marketplace, 1880.

Wailuku will soon have a market-place, and so will Lahaina. Each town has $2,000 appropriated for the purpose. His Excellency Governor Dominis gives his attention to the erection of these useful structures. The fish-market of Lahaina is sometimes more varied and abundant than that of Honolulu. The mullet ponds of Molokai furnish inexhaustible supplies of fish; and the coast and bays of Lanai could supply a great city with crawfish, crustacea, and bivalves of various kinds, and with turtle in exceptional quantities. We have noticed the terrapin brought to Lahaina. The Makawao district will supply the Wailuku market with an abundance of choice beef and mutton. The large and commodious markets at both towns will, no doubt, contribute to the increase and greater variety of supplies.

[Wow, this article has so much varied information: on government spending, fish supply, fish ponds, ranching, &c., &c., &c.]

(Wednesday Express, 9/8/1880, p. 1)

Wailuku will soon have a market-place...

The Wednesday Express, Volume I, Number 1, Page 1. September 8, 1880.

Report of Kalakaua’s death from the “San Francisco Chronicle,” 1891.

KALAKAUA DEAD

Last Hours of the Hawaiian Monarch.

Solemn Scenes at the Royal Bedside.

The Succession and the Political Situation.

Sketches of the Dead Sovereign and of the Heirs to the Throne.

Kalakaua I., King of the Hawaiian Islands, is dead. He expired at 2:33 o’clock yesterday afternoon in his room at the Palace Hotel, where for three days he had lain unconscious on his bed. Surrounding him at the moment of his death were Col. Macfarlane, the King’s Chamberlain; Col. Hoapili Baker, His Majesty’s Equerry-in-waiting; Hawaiian Consul McKinley, Admiral Brown, U. S. N. Rev. J. Sanders Reed, Rev. F. H. Church and a number of personal friends of the King. Immediately after the death, Admiral Brown notified the Secretary of the Navy of that fact, Mayor Sanderson was also notified, and he called a meeting of the Supervisors for 9 o’clock this morning to consider proper action in the matter. The remains were embalmed and this afternoon they will be removed to the mortuary chapel of Trinity Church, where they will be guarded by a detail of United States soldiers.

At the Deathbed.

The Scenes in the Chamber of the Dying Monarch.

It was a pitiful and most impressive scene. The dying monarch lay gasping upon his bed, his emaciated body heaving convulsively with each of his labored respirations. At the bedside stood two ministers of the Gospel, physicians of the body had given way when they had come to the sad conclusion that Kalakaua was beyond mortal aid. Seated at the head of the bed, clasping the left hand of his King was Col. Baker, Kalakaua’s Aid-de-camp, whose strong frame was bent with sorrow, and who with great difficulty kept back the flood of tears which trembled in his eyes. Bending over from the right side was Col. Macfarlane, Chamberlain of the King. The suspense of the last few days had almost prostrated him, and his face bore traces of weeping. Crouched upon the floor against the wall near the bedside were the King’s valet Kahikina, an Hawaiian youth, and Kalua, a young girl from the Gilbert islands, who had been a most devoted servant to Kalakaua. They formed part of his suite on his arrival here.

Only a light coverlet of rich brown design covered the body of the King. In his struggles to throw off the firm reaper who was gradually pressing more heavily upon him, Kalakaua had thrust his arms out upon the bed. During the forenoon his faithful servant Kalua, in an endeavor to make the King as comfortable as possible, had placed beneath his chin a wide soft scarf of blue silk. There it remained until the death, seeming as it rose and fell upon the bright red undershirt to be symbolical of the wavering between this and the great beyond of the spirit of the stricken King.

Kalakaua was possessed of great vitality, and to the last he resisted the destroyer with a persistence which excited the wonder of the medical men, who knew that the King’s time had come. Though for three days past he had been unconscious and life had apparently been kept in him merely by the stimulants applied internally through natural channels or hypodermically, his constitution seemed determined to keep the spirit with the trembling body. Even after the physicians had relinquished all hope and, knowing that he must die, had ceased to apply stimulants, he continued to struggle on.

During the morning Drs. Woods, Watts, Sanger and Taylor were in attendance.

They consulted and announced that in their opinion the King would not live more than a few hours. He had then been unconscious for nearly forty hours, with the exception of one brief moment in the early morning, when he recognized Admiral Brown and spoke to Colonel Baker saying:

“Well, I am a very sick man.” Continue reading

King Kalakaua leaves for America, 1874.

The Alii, the King, boarded the battleship Benecia at 10 oʻclock and 30 minutes on the morning of this past Tuesday [11/17/1874] to go to the United States of America. When he reached the wharf, seaside of Halemahoe, it was an awesome sight; the seeing off by his subjects of the King on his travels to foreign lands. The people crowded together to shake his hand, give gifts, kiss his hand, and chant his name songs, but the King did not dawdle. When the skiff came by for him, accompanied by the Prince Regent [Kahu Aupuni] and the attendants, the sailors of the battleships Tenedos, Scout, and Benecia climbed the yard, and as the skiff moved on, the battery of Ainahou and the two British battleships each gave a 21 gun salute,— Continue reading

Washington Place, 1895.

The Residence of Wasinetona Hale.

We are putting before you the picture of Washington Place on Beritania Street, Honolulu, not because it was the storage for guns and weapons for Liliuokalani, but because it is a very old building constructed in Honolulu nei. The foundation of this house was began with coral blocks by the one called Isaac Adams, for the mother of Governor Dominis, while her husband, Dominis, was sailing as captain aboard a ship from Honolulu to…

WASINETONA HALE

…China, trading with places of the North and then returning to Honolulu. And being that Mrs. Dominis, who accompanied her husband, fancied living here in Honolulu, and building a home here to live in, and forever more leaving her own home in the state of Massachusetts, her husband agreed to her request. It was perhaps 1842 when the foundation was laid, but it was not completed until the beginning of 1846. And on August 5, 1846, Captain Dominis left again on a ship under his leadership, but after he left Honolulu for China, there was no word that his ship landed on any dry land until this day.

Continue reading