Emma Ahuena Taylor remembers Princess Ruth Keelikolani, 1935.

PRINCESS RUTH KEELIKOLANI, HAUGHTY BUT KIND, BELOVED ALII OF OLD DAYS

Her Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani seemed to have always been in my life.

When she came to stay at Wailuakio (Palama), she would always spend the night in my mother’s home. For her retinue was large and my mother’s home was a convenient place to entertain them all. Continue reading

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Birthday of Prince Leleiohoku declared a national holiday, 1875.

[Found under: “MA KE KAUOHA.”]

The approaching 10th of January, 1875, is the day of birth of His Highness, the Prince and Regent of the Kingdom, W. P. LELEIOHOKU; Continue reading

Mele inoa for Kalahoolewa by W. L. Moehonua, 1867.

No William Pitt Leleiohoku, Kalahoolewa o Kaleiopapa.

He inoa keia e Hoku—e,
Pua lei aloha a Anoiu—e,
Nani wale kuu ipo Anolani—e,
Ua nohi uli wale i ka la—e,
Ka maka mohala o ka lehua—e,
Ka nonohi ukulii o ka pua—e,
I pu-a i ka uka o Malama—e,
Ahi awela no Heeia—e,
Kohaihai pua i ka uka—e,
O ke oho laulii o ke koa—e,
Maholehole wale oia la—e,
Ka awihi lihilihi a ka maka—e,
O ka maka kai ike hauna wale—e,
O no no e ka puu kuhikuhi—e,
I ka wai ohelo ohelo—e,
O ka ua noe ia i ka poli—e,
E halia mai nei ke aloha—e,
Aulii oiala oiala—e,
Ka hiwahiwa a loko e piana—e,
Kuu kihei pili mae ole—e,
He aloha—e kaua—e.

W. Luther Moehonua.

(Au Okoa, 5/30/1867, p. 4)

AuOkoa_5_30_1867_4.png

Ke Au Okoa, Buke III, Helu 6, Aoao 4. Mei 30, 1867.

This performance must have been something to see! 1875.

Great Hawaiian Royal Concert

To be given by the Famous Choir of Kawaiahao, under the Direction of Her Highness the Chiefess Lilia K. Dominis, assisted by His Highness the Chief W. P. Leleiohoku, in Kawaiahao Church on this coming Saturday, June 12. Continue reading

Name song for Leleiohoku by William Luther Moehonua, 1867.

No William Pitt Leleiohoku Kalahoolewa o Kaleiopapa.

He inoa keia e Hoku—e,
Pua lei aloha a Anoiu—e,
Nani wale kuu ipo Anolani—e,
Ua nohi uli wale i ka la—e,
Ka maka mohala o ka lehua—e,
Ka nonohi ukulii o ka pua—e,
I pu-a i ka uka o Malama—e,
Ahi awela no Heeia—e,
Kohaihai pua i ka uka—e,
O ke oho laulii o ke koa—e,
Maholehole wale oia la—e,
Ka awihi lihilihi a ka maka—e,
O ka maka kai ike hauna wale—e,
O no no e ka puu kuhikuhi—e,
I ka wai ohelo ohelo—e,
O ka ua noe ia i ka poli—e,
E halia mai nei ke aloha—e,
Aulii oiala oiala—e,
Ka hiwahiwa a loko e piana—e,
Kuu kihei pili mae ole—e,
He aloha—e kaua—e.

W. Luther Moehonua.

(Au Okoa, 5/30/1867, p. 4)

No William Pitt Leleiohoku Kalahoolewa o Kaleiopapa

Ke Au Okoa, Buke III, Helu 6, Aoao 4. Mei 30, 1867.

 

20th birthday of Prince Leleiohoku, 1875.

Birthday of the Heir Apparent.

On this coming Sunday, the 10th of January, that is the birthday of Prince W. P. Leleiohoku, and it will be the twentieth year of his life. He was born on the 10th of January, 1855, on the day of the funeral of King Kauikeaouli, and for that reason he was named Kalahoolewa. From what we hear, that day will be celebrated as a holiday [la kulaia]; however, because it falls on the Sabbath, the celebration will be postponed until Monday, that being the 11th of January of this year; and this will be the first time that his birthday will be widely celebrated, as we respectfully give commemoration to the Heir Apparent in place of his Elder Brother Monarch who has left for foreign lands. With feelings of hope, we wish that the holiday will be celebrated all over the nation suitably.

(Lahui Hawaii, 1/1/1875, p. 2)

La Hanau o ka Hooilina Moi.

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 1, Aoao 2. Ianuari 1, 1875.

The 1874 speech of Leleiohoku at Kalaupapa, 1891.

THE SPEECH OF THE REGENT, PRINCE LELEIOHOKU, AT THE COLONY OF KALAUPAPA, MOLOKAI.

November 28, 1874.

O Citizens of the Alii, King Kalakaua I., a fraction of his people, aloha to you.

This was the day that we gained the independence of this our mother country, and it is a day for you, Hawaiian people, to rejoice.

In this rejoicing however, there is also something to be anguished and mournful about, for if you turn and look back, there is not your wife, or children, or your family, or the rest, if you are a man who was separated here by the government to come to Kalaupapa; auwe, this is something that pains his heart for his companion, his wife; and so too for the woman who grieves for her husband; and the parent who grieves for his child, and the child for his parent, and so forth.

O Makaainana of King Kalakaua I., living in this friendless land, you have but one friend, that being the protection of the government.

This painful burden that you have been stricken with does not come through the control of the child of man, but comes from God.

Therefore, all you makaainana who have aloha for your alii, I am one of your parents, but I am powerless to divert the power of the law, for I am but a student of the law; yet it pains me to see you, O Beloved makaainana; I first saw some of you turning your faces away from mine.

But should there be a time in the future, when the rule falls totally upon me, then that will be the time when I will search out and put my efforts into finding relief for all of us, but that lies in the hands of the one who created us.

Therefore, O Beloved makaainana, do forgive me, and may the power of the Lord help us all.

[You never know where you will find information. I have not been able to find mention of this speech by Leleiohoku in 1874, but 17 years later…]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 9/25/1891, p. 2)

KA HAIOLELO A KE KAHU AUPUNI, KE KEIKI ALII LELEIOHOKU...

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 289, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 25, 1891.