Patients remaining at Kalaupapa, 1917.

Report on the Patients of Kalaupapa

In the report of the President of the Board of Health [Papa Ola], Dr. J. S. B. Pratt, pertaining to the patients of the leprosy colony at Kalaupapa, the number of patients living there has decreased, being that during the past June there were 587 patients at Kalaupapa, which is 42 less than the previous year. Continue reading

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Anti-Annexation sentiment from the United States, 1897.

WHY WE DO NOT WANT HAWAII.

  1. Because the Hawaiians do not wish annexation, as the anti-annexation petition of 21,000 names—seven times the voters under the constitution of the “republic”—proves beyond question.
  2. Because annexation means a leprous Asiatic and Kanaka population for a new State, with two Senators in our Congress.
  3. Because the islands are five days and five nights’ steaming from our coast.
  4. Because to fortify them would cost upward of $200,000,000, and to provide a navy to defend them at least $200,000,000 more.
  5. Because we control them now and have a coaling station there which can be fortified at a fraction of the cost of fortifying all of the populated islands.
  6. Because their commerce is small and incapable of great expansion, and their climate assures the continuance of the domination of the brown races forever.
  7. Because they would be a burden and expense in time of peace and a danger in time of war.

Continue reading

Was Emalia Kaihumua not Sweet Emalia? 1906.

WIFE BEATER’S WORK UNCOVERS A SUSPECT

Emalia Kaihumua, a sister of “Sweet” Emalia, whose record with the police extends over a number of years, was severely beaten by her husband yesterday, her jaw being broken with a demijohn. The injured woman was brought to the police station, and she was given medical treatment. Continue reading

Donation from the Patriotic League of Kalaupapa, 1898.

ASSISTANCE FOR THE DELEGATES.

The Treasurer of the Delegates’ Funds, Miss Lucy Peabody, received from the Head Secretary of the Patriotic League [Ahahui Aloha Aina] of the Hawaiian Archipelago, fifteen dollars ($15.00) from the Patriotic League of Kalaupapa, Molokai.

[Even fifteen dollars was a great sum of money during those days.]

(Aloha Aina, 2/26/1898, p. 5)

AlohaAina_2_26_1898_5.png

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 9, Aoao 5. Feberuari 26, 1898.

Aloha Aina! 1898.

ALOHA FOR REMEMBERING.

Yes, our hearts are awed and deeply moved seeing the beloved assistance of the patients of Kalaupapa for the Delegates of the lahui. This is a great gift for us for it arrived like manna from heaven; the little amount that they sent is far greater than the thousands and hundreds from those who are prosperous.  For their living is not in luxury, nor in joy, but in constant grief, sorrow, and anguish. And as there was encouragement to all Patriots urging them to give assistance to our Delegates, a feeling of excitement awoke in the minds of these frail ones to give aloha to their fellow men who are tirelessly working in the fury of Washington for the rights of the land, the people, and the monarchy of Hawaii. Continue reading

A mele by Annie Kaikioewa for her daughter, Helina Kaiwaokalani Maikai, 1909.

HE WEHI NO KUU KAMA

He iini he aloha no kuu kamalei
E hoi e pili poli o ka makua
Kuu lei daimana e anapa i ka la
Kuu pua melia onaona i ka ihu
Kuu lei hulu mamo kahiko i ke kino
Kuu ahuula nani kau i ka poohiwi
Kuu lei alii i ka pili umauma
Kuu hiialo hoi o na la opio
Kuu pua hoonani kahiko o ka hale
Hoi mai kaua ka la’i i Apua
I ka home pilipaa me ou kupuna Continue reading