What will happen to the people suffering from leprosy? 1893.

PERTAINING TO THE MA’I LEPERA.

What will become of the friends who are suffering from being dealt with that hand of grief and sadness from here on. We are now under a new government and new Board of Health [Papa Ola], but their Commissioners are in Washington where they are trying to annex us with America, and if we are indeed annexed, what will happen to our friends who are afflicted with this sickness? That nation is very frightened and hateful of those who have the disease, and what in the world will be the outcome?

(Hawaii Holomua, 3/11/1893, p. 3)

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Band of Kalaupapa, 1893.

Correspondences

PERTAINING TO THE

Gift to the Band of Kalaupapa.

Honolulu, May 15, 1893.

Mr. Ambrose Hutchison,
Kalaupapa, Molokai.

Aloha oe:

The Hawaiian Gazette Company (Kuokoa Printing Company) has taken a collection and has made $207 from donations made by the few friends of the leprosy patients for the benefit of the Leprosy Band as per the list of names also sent. This sum of money is intended for purchasing uniforms if desired, along with caps, and to refurbish the instruments or to purchase new ones as necessary.

This sum of money is given to the President of the Board of Health, Hon. W. O. Smith, to hold for the purpose it was donated.

And we those who donated the money join together with us in joy in being able to help by supplying the things that will bring happiness to the leprosy patients on Molokai, by donating to the band some things that give them great enjoyment while they live a life of suffering.

However, we think that the band should give two performances every week when and where your local authorities [luna kuloko] decide, so that everyone can rejoice in the music. That is the desire of many of the donors.

Your true friend;

H. M. Whitney,
Manager of the Hawaiian Gazette Co.

———- Continue reading

Patients remaining at Kalaupapa, 1917.

Report on the Patients of Kalaupapa

In the report of the President of the Board of Health [Papa Ola], Dr. J. S. B. Pratt, pertaining to the patients of the leprosy colony at Kalaupapa, the number of patients living there has decreased, being that during the past June there were 587 patients at Kalaupapa, which is 42 less than the previous year. Continue reading

Anti-Annexation sentiment from the United States, 1897.

WHY WE DO NOT WANT HAWAII.

  1. Because the Hawaiians do not wish annexation, as the anti-annexation petition of 21,000 names—seven times the voters under the constitution of the “republic”—proves beyond question.
  2. Because annexation means a leprous Asiatic and Kanaka population for a new State, with two Senators in our Congress.
  3. Because the islands are five days and five nights’ steaming from our coast.
  4. Because to fortify them would cost upward of $200,000,000, and to provide a navy to defend them at least $200,000,000 more.
  5. Because we control them now and have a coaling station there which can be fortified at a fraction of the cost of fortifying all of the populated islands.
  6. Because their commerce is small and incapable of great expansion, and their climate assures the continuance of the domination of the brown races forever.
  7. Because they would be a burden and expense in time of peace and a danger in time of war.

Continue reading

Was Emalia Kaihumua not Sweet Emalia? 1906.

WIFE BEATER’S WORK UNCOVERS A SUSPECT

Emalia Kaihumua, a sister of “Sweet” Emalia, whose record with the police extends over a number of years, was severely beaten by her husband yesterday, her jaw being broken with a demijohn. The injured woman was brought to the police station, and she was given medical treatment. Continue reading

Donation from the Patriotic League of Kalaupapa, 1898.

ASSISTANCE FOR THE DELEGATES.

The Treasurer of the Delegates’ Funds, Miss Lucy Peabody, received from the Head Secretary of the Patriotic League [Ahahui Aloha Aina] of the Hawaiian Archipelago, fifteen dollars ($15.00) from the Patriotic League of Kalaupapa, Molokai.

[Even fifteen dollars was a great sum of money during those days.]

(Aloha Aina, 2/26/1898, p. 5)

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Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 9, Aoao 5. Feberuari 26, 1898.