Might this be the reason the song “Palisa” was written? 1908.

SELECTED FILMS FOR THE SETTLEMENT

Messrs. C. G. Bockus, Gerrit Wilder and C. S. Crane, the committee named to select and purchase moving-picture film for the machine shortly to be taken to the Molokai Settlement, watched R. K. Bonine exhibit a mile or so of views and stunts submitted to them for sale. Mr. Bonine had put his machine and his skill at the service of the committee, and the tests of the various films were made in his studio. There were several persons to watch in addition to the committeemen, including Superintendent Jack McVeigh of the Settlement and A. Gartley, and the various pictures were criticized as to their particular merits for the desired use. Continue reading

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More on the leprosy patients, 1868.

The Lepers.—The active measures of the Board of Health to make another thorough examination of the Islands, for the purpose of staying the spread of leprosy, has attracted public attention to what is being done, in this matter of the public health. As the settlement at Molokai becomes thoroughly organized, and its comfortable provision for the lepers becomes better known, there is less dread and less unwillingness on the part of the suspected, to report themselves for examination. With a perseverance in the course adopted, the lepers throughout the Islands will soon be all gathered in and disposed of in the quarters assigned for their future residence. Continue reading

On leprosy, 1868.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO: Oahu.”]

Leprosy patients.—One day last week all the way to Tuesday of this week, there were [?? many] leprosy patients taken to Molokai from the hospital of Kalihi. There were an unprecedented number of patients who were [????], but because they could not stay mixed up with those a little better off, therefore they were set apart, to the island, the great Molokai of Hina, without thought [???] if they are saved, in that there are no doctors stationed at the home to which they were sent.

[This volume of the Kuokoa was obviously bound into a book, and unfortunately this article fell next to the tight binding, and so it is difficult to make out the words on the right edge. It is time that the newspapers were unbound and rescanned as clearly as possible.]

(Kuokoa, 9/26/1868, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 39, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 26, 1868.

On population, 1873.

Population of the Hawaiian Archipelago.

In this issue, we put before as a free paper for our readers the population chart of these Hawaiian Islands for the year 1872. For those who understand the population chart, they will think that it is something valuable, but for those who think it has no value, we should probably cover the important aspects. Continue reading

John Waiamau Kekuhaupio Aneheialima dies, 1901.

REV. J. WAIAMAU HAS PASSED.

Passed at 12:30 in the Dawn of Monday.

Many Friends Went on His Final Journey—He was 64 Years Old.

At dawn on Monday of this week, the life breath of John Waiamau Kekuhaupio Aneheialima was fetched and taken from the one known to us by his first names. With his death, gone is one of the kind, generous, good, and enlightened elders of this archipelago. He was born at Niulii, Kohala, Hawaii, in the year 1837; he spent sixty-four years of his life in this world. Aneheialima was his Father, and Waiwaiole was his Mother.

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