Olivia K. Nakea performs on KGU, 1930.

Quartet Sings Old Hymns of Hawaii For Leper Colony

A  program of sacred Hawaiian music will be heard through KGU this evening from 6:10 to 6:30. A mixed quartet under direction of Olivia Nakea will present the first of a series of  songs for “shut-ins” throughout the territory. Continue reading

Helen K. Davis performs, 1925.

HELEN K. DAVIS, Hawaiian soprano, who entertained the radio audiences on “Hawaiian Night” at KGU.

[Other than the mele for William Heen, does anyone know of mele composed by Helen K. Davis?]

(Advertiser, 8/29/1925, p. 3)

Advertiser_8_29_1925_3

Honolulu Advertiser, 70th Year, Number 13,721, Page 3. August 29, 1925.

Charles E. King critique of “modern” Hawaiian music, 1939.

King Says Hawaiians Ruining Island Music

Venerable Charles E. King, whose Song of the Islands is among the most widely known of all Hawaiian music, pulled no punches in a talk before the Hawaiian Civic club today on modern  day treatment of island songs.

“Hawaiian music,” said Mr. King, speaking at the club luncheon at the YWCA at noon, “is being murdered—and by Hawaiians.” Continue reading

79 years ago, Inter-Island Play Day for Women, 1937.

LOCAL GIRLS TO GO TO MOLOKAI

Under the leadership of Eliza K. Osorio and Irene K. Silva, directors of the Hilo Women’s Athletic association, 31 local girls will leave for Molokai this Sunday on the steamer to attend the fifth annual Inter-island Play Day of Women which will be held on Molokai on March 23, 24, and 25. The play festival was held two years in Hilo and a year ago on Maui.

Girls making the trip from Hilo are: Margaret Brown, Harriet Brown, Yok Lan Mehau, Christine Almeida, Pua Ho-a, Betty Watai, Elsie Watai, Mary Cootey, Virginia Asau, Margaret Kimi, [Napua] Harriet Stevens, Continue reading

Nora Rickard of Honokaa turns 90, 1938.

Mother Rickard Celebrates her birthday

MRS. RICKARD

On Sunday, March 6, “Mother” Nora Rickard of Honokaa celebrated her 90th birthday, after living until local on the Island of Keawe for 71 years. She was born in Devonshire, England, and left there when she was 19 years old and went to America on a sailboat travelling under Cape Horn [Kaipo Hone], a trip that took five months.

“Mother” Rickard is the first white woman who lived in Honokaa. She is still strong and spry, even if she is very old. Pertaining to her trip from England, she says: Continue reading

John Palimoo, Jr., steel guitarist on the radio, 1927.

ENTERTAINING THE MULTITUDES ON K. G. U., JOHN PALIMOO, JR.

He is a member of the Firemen’s Glee Club [Kalapu Himeni], the one who entertained the pubic many a time on K. K. U. [K. G. U.] recently, receiving acclaim because of his new way of playing on his guitar, making it sound like bells.

[Notice the first line on the right column. On occasion, there will be a misplaced line or section, especially in the later years of the newspapers, and the line that reads “le ai iloko o ka muliwai he ekolu” seems to be out of place.

Does anyone have any information on this steel guitar player, John Palimoo, Jr.?]

(Kuokoa, 9/8/1927, p.2)

HE MEA HOOHAUOLI MA KE K. G. U. I KA LEHULEHU, JOHN PALIMOO, JR.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXVI, Helu 35, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 8, 1927.