Words of advice from a concerned Hawaiian, 1944.

SINGING HAWAIIAN SONGS

Editor The Advertiser:

As a Hawaiian I enjoy listening to the sweet Hawaiian music on my radio from 7:30 a.m. to midnight. But I agree with many other Hawaiians who I have heard complain about our young peoples singing nowadays. Perhaps there might be a way to help these young generation and also the future generations keep up the proper way of singing our beloved Hawaiian songs and not to murder them or change them as they are being changed by jazzing or perhaps boogle them. Why not keep them as the composer intended to express their feelings. For example the song, “Kahuahuai.” It is not a war chant. It’s a love song telling of their love for each other and how they had weathered the cold together among the fragranted ferns, etc. Continue reading

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Charles E. King’s “Prince of Hawaii,” 1925.

THE OPERA FOR THE PRINCE OF HAWAII.

In the Liberty Theater, beginning on the night of the 4th of the coming month of May, until the 9th, shown will be an opera for the very first time, called the Prince of Hawaii, under the direction and management of Mr. C. E. King.

In this first opera of Hawaii nei, selected was Raymond Kinney, as the prince of Hawaii; Joseph Kamakau, the king; Rose Tribe, the queen; and Harriet Beamer, as the princess. Others who were selected are Judge John R. Desha and Johanna Wilcox. Continue reading

Napoleon Kalolii Pukui supporting Charles E. King for delegate to Congress, 1922.

Truth of Truths.

There was something new heard from my candidate, Charles E. King [Kale E. Kini], when he announced on the past 18th, that being this past Monday, that he met with Papai (Clarence Crabbe), the manager of John Wise [Keoni Waika], who relayed his thoughts to my candidate. “We were given the endorsement from the prominent ones [maka nunui] of five sugar plantations, and here in the palm of my hand is the money to push John Wise into the win, the candidate of their choice.

“Therefore, you and Lyman [Laimana] have no hopes for winning.”

That was wen my candidate replied back to him, “Hey, Papai [“Crab”], wasn’t it you who came before me in person three times asking for me to run as a candidate this season?” So I said to you, What about John Wise? And you told me that I cannot trust him; you are the one that I trust, more than him; and now you are tossing me aside. This is not something that will make me give up; I will run for the win and the victory.”

This is what Papai’s answer was to him, “I really don’t want this job, my being prodded on at this work by the big wigs of the Sugar Plantations.”

So therefore friends, we see the sugar plantation’s representative and fishing konohiki; we scope out the name of the fish of the fisherman, a “Papai,” and that is the fish caught in the fish trap [hinai] of John Wise, his fish is a crab.

He will not catch the delectable travelling uhu of Kaena Point, the craving of the daughter of Kakuhihewa. How is that fisherman throwing out his chum; he probably did not consider first the flow of the current; he just threw out his chum where the current will carry it out to Mauiloa, and so the fisherman will return home with nothing, his fish will be the crab, the crab with its menacing claws.

We all know that money is being thrown about these days; take it and fill your palms, but on election day, think carefully. Let Charles King be yours.

Sincerely,

NAPOLEON K. PUKUI

[The word play in the original Hawaiian is very fun. N. K. Pukui was a character!]

(Kuokoa, 10/5/1922, p. 7)

KA OIAIO O NA OIAIO.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 40, Aoao 7. Okatoba 5, 1922.

First Kamehameha class reunites, 1916.

TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

Students of the ’91 Graduate Class of Kamehameha: Those standing from the Left—Thomas N. Haae, Charles Blake, William M. Keolanui, Samuel Kauhane, Fred K. Beckley, William K. Rathburn. Those seated—Solomon Hanohano, John K. Waiamau, William O. Crowell, Charles E. King, and Samuel Keliinoi.

[There are many priceless articles on this reunion; this includes the one that accompanies the picture which can be found here from pages 1 & 3.

It is pretty awesome that we can compare the graduation portrait of the class of 1891 which is on the Kamehameha Schools Archives page with this picture from 25 years later!]

(Kuokoa, 6/16/1916, p. 3)

HOOMANAO I KA PIHA ANA O NA MAKAHIKI HE IWAKALUA-KUMAMALIMA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIV, Helu 24, Aoao 3. Iune 16, 1916.

 

The first Kamehameha class celebrates reunion, 1916.

The Alumni Remember

For the 25th anniversary of their graduation from Kamehameha School, the boys of the class of 1891 are looking back; it is the first class that graduated from that school, under the principal Rev. W. B. Oleson.

The 10th, 11th, and 12th of upcoming June will be set aside as time to reflect by the students still alive today.

From within the class of 14 that graduated in 1891, there are 12 of them still living, and two that passed away. Those residing in this town are: Charles E. King, Samuel Keliinoi, Frederick William Beckley, Solomon Hanohano, William K. Rathburn, and John K. Waiamau. On Hawaii island are Samuel Kauhane, William M. Keolanui, Enock Brown [Enoch Brown], and Thomas N. Haae. On Kauai is Charles Blake and William O. Crowell. The students who passed away are Robert Pahau and Moses Kauwe.

(Kuokoa, 5/12/1916, p. 1)

E HOOMANAO ANA NA HAUMANA KAHIKO

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIV, Helu 19, Aoao 1. Mei 12, 1916.

Hawaiian Opera, 1925.

Glee Club of Charles E. King

This is a scene from the Opera “Prince of Hawaii” presented at the Liberty Theater on the night of Monday last, continuing its performance until the night of Saturday, May 9. Mr. C. E. King put together this Opera, and there are only talented singers who perform the songs.

There was much lauding of the performance of Monday night, and for that reason, Liberty Theater has been full every night since–not just for the beautiful appearance of the singers, but also because of the beauty of their singing.

The proceeds of this opera will go to funding the education of Hawaiian children; for a scholarship set up by the Hawaiian Civic Club.

[I’m not much into opera, but I still would like to have witnessed this first hand!]

(Kuokoa 5/7/1925, p.1)

Ka Hui Himeni a Chas. E. King

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIV, Helu 19, Aoao 1. Mei 7, 1925.

Kuhio and the Hawaiian Civic Clubs. 1918.

THE PARTY OF HAWAIIANS  WAS FILLED WITH ENTHUSIASM

Hawaiians Gathered at the Young Hotel at the Invitation of Prince Kalanianaole

HEARD WAS IDEAS FOR UNIFICATION

Desired that Hawaiians Stand Together as a People

On the sixth floor of the Young Hotel, at noon this past Tuesday, the Hawaiians of this town gathered for the first time, for a luncheon amid enthusiasm and joy, and this will be a regular thing, like the haole regularly meet at noon on Wednesdays.

This was a meeting organized by Prince Kalanianaole, and Hawaiians of good standing who live here in town were invited to attend, without attention being paid to political affiliation; it is true, many Hawaiians came, and the total number was about seventy-one; and being that this is just the beginning, it will be more full in the future, should this gathering at lunch become a regular thing.

At this meeting was Prince Kalanianaole, the chairman of this meeting and luncheon, and also Mayor Fern, Circuit Judge Heen, Rev. Akaiko Akana, Senators John H. Wise and Charles E. King, Representative Kumalae, Sheriff Charles H. Rose, and some other Hawaiian leaders of town; and everyone gathered there that afternoon seemed spirited to stand shoulder to shoulder, chest to chest, in all things; to lift this lahui from the low level to be equal with the other ethnicities in all aspects.

In order to move forward the agenda for which the Hawaiians gathered at that luncheon, Prince Kalanianaole explained that he greatly wished that the Hawaiian people would think as one, and as a means to that ends, he believes that meeting together in one place by holding regular luncheons of that sort, is where you’d discuss things and hear explanation from different people on all questions regarding the well-being of Hawaiians.

“The great problem seen amongst us, as a people,” according to him, is that we don’t cooperate; we all stand independently, and when we want good works to be done, it is very hard to accomplish for we lack unity and strength.

“Unifying ourselves, and listening to people talk about things that will benefit this lahui is very important for the perpetuation of the lahui; and as we gather regularly at meals of this sort, we will become familiar with each other, and we will hear ideas that should be carried out, and we will be seen as a lahui.”

Some time was spent by Prince Kalanianaole explaining the goals of that gathering while his speech was encouraged by applause, then he called up Circuit Judge Heen to give a few words of clarification before the crowd.

According to him, he was not prepared with a clear topic to talk about, however, he was in agreement with Prince Kalanianaole; all Hawaiians must stand together and work as one in all endeavors that will better themselves as a lahui.

J. Ordenstein, John H. Wise, Charles Achi, Jr., Fred Beckley, Charles E. King, Charles Dwight, Mayor Fern, and Rev. Akaiko Akana were called to explain their overall thoughts as to what is to be done to benefit Hawaiians from here forth.

Rev. Akaiko Akana shared his thoughts; when Hawaiians go back to their traditional occupations [?] and cherish their way of life, that is the only way Hawaiians will be blessed.

The big problem with this lahui, according to him, is the lack of knowledge and readiness to go into business for themselves and so too with being economical; when these important things are acquired by Hawaiians, they will be able to climb to a high level.

Mr. Wise and Mayor Fern were some who spoke of their ideas on the question of leasing a building [?], and their ideas were heard with much enthusiasm.

Before the meeting was adjourned, one idea was approved, to draft a constitution for a club, and to place it in the hands of a committee to lay out the foundation and mission that this association of Hawaiians would carry out.

(Kuokoa, 11/29/1918, p. 1)

PIHA OHOHIA KA PAINA A NA KANAKA HAWAII

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVI, Helu 48, Aoao 1. Novemaba 29, 1918.