Canaries for sale, 1865.

CANARY BIRDS!

THE BEST EVER IMPORTED

into this Market, guaranteed

Good SINGERS!

For Sale at

C. FRED. PFLUGER’S

Fort Street, nearly opposite Messrs. von Holt & Heuck.

(PCA,  8/12/1865, p. 1)

PCA_8_12_1865_1

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume X, Number 6, Page 1. August 12, 1865.

Kamehameha Day proclaimed, 1871.

HAWAIIAN GAZETTE

M. RAPLEE,
DIRECTOR OF THE GOVERNMENT PRESS

HONOLULU:
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 27, 1871.

MA KE KAUOHA.

Ma ka Lokomaikai o ke Akua, o Makou o Kamehameha V., ka Moi o ko Hawaii Pae Aina, ma keia, ke kukala aku nei o ko makou makemake a me ka oluolu, e malamaia ma keia hope aku ka La Umikumakahi o Iune, Continue reading

Kamehameha V proclaims the 11th of June a holiday in honor of Kamehameha Paiea, 1872.

KE AU OKOA.

JOHN M. KAPENA
EDITOR

HONOLULU, JANUARY 4, 1872

BY AUTHORITY.

We, Kamehameha V, by the Grace of God, of the Hawaiian Islands, King, do hereby proclaim, that it is Our will and pleasure that the eleventh day of June of each year be hereafter observed as a Public Holiday in memory of Our Grand-father and Predecessor, Kamehameha I., Continue reading

Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation reaches Hawaii nei, 1863.

[Found under: “KA NU HOU HOPE LOA.”]

—The President of the United States has pronounced his proclamation that the “nika” who are being enslaved in the states of the United States that rebelled will be freed, but notwithstanding the states that did not rebel; they shall give wages to their “nika,” and these are the words of the proclamation of the President:

“A no ia mea, owau o Aberahama Linekona, ka Peresidena o Amerika Huipuia, ma ka mana i haawiia mai ia’u ma ko’u ano Alihikaua o na puali koa a me na aumoku kaua, i ka wa e kipiia mai nei o Amerika Huipuia, a ma ke ano kaua hoi, i mea e hoopau ai ia kipi ana, ke hoike nei ma keia la mua o Ianuari, M. H. 1836, a e like hoi me ka’u i manao ai e pai ia ka’u olelo kuahaua mahope o kka hala ana o na la hookahi haneri, mai ka la i kakau ia’i ka olelo i haiia maluna, ke kuikahi nei i na mokuuaina a me na apana, kahi nona ka poe kanaka e noho kipi ana ia Amerika Huipuia i keia la, eia mahope nei, penei: Continue reading

Emancipation Proclamation, 1863.

NEWS BY MAL.

The Emancipation Proclamation–The Slaves of Rebels Declared Free–Blacks to be Received into the Army and Navy

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, On the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two,  a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit:

“That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom. Continue reading

Pan-Pacific Club promotes the ukulele, 1916.

PAN-PACIFIC CLUB WILL GET BEHIND HAWAIIAN UKULELE

Plans to Co-operate With Promotion Committee To Put Instrument Where It Belongs

MAINLAND DEALERS ARE TO BE SHOWN ITS MERIT

Quality and Output In Large Numbers Urged To Compete With Manufacturers In States

The Hawaiian ukulele in all its parts was one of the first exhibits of home manufacture to be sent to the Pan-Pacific industrial museum, and the Pan-Pacific Club is now co-operating with the promotion committee to put the Hawaiian ukulele where it belongs in the mainland. The promotion committee has received severe criticism from leading music houses in the mainland, setting forth the advantages of machine-made koa ukuleles manufactured in the mainland from Hawaiian wood, and insinuating that the hand made ukuleles of Hawaii might be greatly improved if up-to-date methods and machinery were used under the supervision of instrumental specialists from the mainland. They point out that as many thousands of ukuleles are sold every month now throughout America, and the little Hawaiian instrument has become recognized and a permanent place made for it, it might be well for the Hawaiian manufacturers to get together and pull together.

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Kumalae ukulele in Missouri, 1917.

The UKULELE

It’s Ukulele Time at

The Music House

JENKINS

Learn to play this fascinating Hawaiian instrument. New Complete, Original Method taught by Messrs. Paul L. French and Louis M. Johnson of California. For a Limited Time Only, 5-lessson Complete Course, 25c and 50c each lesson in classes; individual instruction, 75 cents per lesson. Take a “Uke” on your vacation.

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