Washington Place, 1895.

The Residence of Wasinetona Hale.

We are putting before you the picture of Washington Place on Beritania Street, Honolulu, not because it was the storage for guns and weapons for Liliuokalani, but because it is a very old building constructed in Honolulu nei. The foundation of this house was began with coral blocks by the one called Isaac Adams, for the mother of Governor Dominis, while her husband, Dominis, was sailing as captain aboard a ship from Honolulu to…

WASINETONA HALE

…China, trading with places of the North and then returning to Honolulu. And being that Mrs. Dominis, who accompanied her husband, fancied living here in Honolulu, and building a home here to live in, and forever more leaving her own home in the state of Massachusetts, her husband agreed to her request. It was perhaps 1842 when the foundation was laid, but it was not completed until the beginning of 1846. And on August 5, 1846, Captain Dominis left again on a ship under his leadership, but after he left Honolulu for China, there was no word that his ship landed on any dry land until this day.

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Ia oe e ka la e alohi nei… 1874.

The Birthday of the King.

Monday, the 16th of November, is the birthday of our beloved King Kalakaua. He was born in the year 1833, and he will be making forty-three years old. In the column ‘Ma ke Kauoha’ [By Authority], seen is the Government notice that the birthday of our King will be held as a Day of Thanks to the Almighty God, for the blessings received by our lahui this past year; He has kindly assisted our King and His People in progressive endeavors and in things that will benefit our homeland, and may He watch over the King during His time away from his Kingdom of Islands on His travels.

Therefore, we ask the lahui from Hawaii to Niihau to heed the good announcement of the Government, that this day shall be a day of prayer, and that meetings will be held to kneel and give appreciation to the Almighty Father; and let us not forget to ask of the Heavens to watch over the King who He in his benevolence has placed as a Father to the lahui of these islands in the Pacific Ocean, while He will be travelling to seek blessings for us all.

On Tuesday, November 17th, our King and the Governor of Oahu, J. O. Dominis, along with the Governor of Maui, J. M. Kapena, will go on a trip to Washington to meet with the President of the United States of America.

(Kuokoa, 11/7/1874, p. 2)

Ka la Hanau o ka Moi.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIII, Helu 5, Aoao 2. Novemaba 7, 1874.

Royal huakai, 1865.

[Found under: “BITS OF NEWS OF HAWAII NEI.”]

Circuit:—On Wednesday of the week last, that being the 22nd, some of the royal descendants made a circuit of Oahu nei, that being Mrs. Pauahi Bishop, Mrs. Kamakeha Dominis [Kamakaeha Dominis] and her husband, the Honorable D. Kalakaua, and Captain Hanham, the captain of a single-masted warship, along with their travelling companions. Splendid was their view of Kaliuwaa, where the youth Kamapuaa revealed himself and his strength; along with the other famous sites. Long live the young Alii in God!

(Kuokoa, 3/30/1865, p. 2)

Hele Kaapuni...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 13, Aoao 2. Maraki 30, 1865.

More on the Honorable Lilia Kamakaeha Paki’s marriage, 1862.

The Ones Who Were Married.

At 8 o’clock at night, on the 16th of this month, the Honorable Lilia Kamakaeha Paki was married to Adjutant General, Major John O. Dominis at Haleakala, the house of the Honorable C. R. Bishop and A. Pauahi Bishop. The ones who attended the royal bride were Elizabeth Kekaaniau Laanui and Martha Swinton; those attending the groom were the Honorable Colonel D. Kalakaua and William Allen [? William Allani] (of Kawaihae).

Present were the Chief, the King; her Highness Princess V. Kaahumanu, his Highness L. Kamehameha; the Honorable Governor Kekuanaoa; Colonel P. Y. Kekuaokalani; and the parents of the bride, and the parent and cousins of the groom.

The ones to be wed were gathered and they went out and entered the great parlor and it was there that the couple stood.

The uniting of the pair was done with much reverence, and all the proceedings of the wedding were fine, as well as with the attendants.

The Rev. C. Damon stood and began the marriage ceremony; then the ring and the marriage fee [? ka uku o ka mare ana] was given to the groom, from the groom to the bride, and from the bride to the Priest; the Priest took the fee and gave the ring once more to the groom, who put it on the brideʻs finger. When this was done, the groom was made to give his vow and then the bride. The couple were questioned, and then the two knelt down and Priest gave a prayer, and after the prayer, the Priest asked, “Who will give this woman to this man?” The Honorable C. R. Bishop stood and took the hand of the bride and gave it to the groom; the Honorable A. Pauahi Bishop, the parents of the couple and everyone else stood once more and approached. Everyone was full of joy for this beautiful wedding.

In midday of that very day, a party was given for their cortege, and all who found themselves amongst that fine gathering felt admiration.

After the marriage of the alii, the attendants returned to their sides until they reached Washington Place [Wasenetona Hale], the place of residence of the groom.

It is said that this is the second of the righteous marriages known in our tiny Kingdom, and by glancing through the gate, it is indeed righteous.

These are fine examples for those who are not married, so that the Royal family that associates with the multitudes will become numerous. There are but a few High Chiefs born of the land left, and with this marriage to a haole Royal one, it is hoped that the Royal couple live righteously along with the prayer that they bear good fruit of the sacred descent of the line of Heulu.

[Does anyone know if Pauahi had a name that started with an “A.”? For some reason she is here twice referred to as A. Pauahi Bihopa.]

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 9/18/1862, p. 2)

Na mea Mare.

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika Buke I, Helu 52, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 18, 1862.

More on Liliu’s marriage, 1862.

I was engaged to Mr. Dominis for about two years and it was our intention to be married on the second day of September, 1862. But by reason of the fact that the court was in affliction and mourning, our wedding was delayed at the request of the king, Kamehameha IV., to the sixteenth of that month; Rev. Dr. Damon, father of Mr. S. M. Damon, at present the leading banker of the Islands, being the officiating clergyman. It was celebrated at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Bishop, in the house which had been erected by my father, Paki, and which, known as the Arlington Hotel [Haleakala], is still one of the most beautiful and central of the mansions in Honolulu. To it came all the high chiefs then living there, also the foreign residents; in fact, all the best society of the city.

[This is what Queen Liliuokalani had to say about her marriage in Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen, first published in 1898. Mahalo to Heather Wilkinson Rojo for her response on the previous post, saying she posted an image of their marriage certificate on her blog. This is one of the many priceless treasures cared for by the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum!]

(Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen, 1988. p. 22.)

Marriage of Liliuokalani and John Owen Dominis, 1862.

Marriage.—At 8 in the evening of Tuesday, the 16th of this month, the Honorable Lydia Kamakaeha Paki and Adjutant General Major J. O. Dominis were wed at the Residence of the Honorable C. R. Bishop and his Queen. The two were married in the Anglican faith.

Present were the King; her Highness Princess V. K. Kaahumanu; his Highness Prince L. Kamehameha; the Honorable M. Kekuanaoa, the Royal Governor of Oahu; Colonel Peter Young Kekuaokalani; also there were the parents of the bride, and the mother of the groom, and his cousins.

Rev. Samuel C. Damon was who performed the ceremony. It was appreciated for its righteousness and honor. With the two of them are the thoughts of aloha of this paper.

(Kuokoa, 9/20/1862, p. 3)

Mareia.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 43, Aoao 3. Sepatemaba 20, 1862.