Ia oe e ka la e alohi nei… 1874.

The Birthday of the King.

Monday, the 16th of November, is the birthday of our beloved King Kalakaua. He was born in the year 1833, and he will be making forty-three years old. In the column ‘Ma ke Kauoha’ [By Authority], seen is the Government notice that the birthday of our King will be held as a Day of Thanks to the Almighty God, for the blessings received by our lahui this past year; He has kindly assisted our King and His People in progressive endeavors and in things that will benefit our homeland, and may He watch over the King during His time away from his Kingdom of Islands on His travels.

Therefore, we ask the lahui from Hawaii to Niihau to heed the good announcement of the Government, that this day shall be a day of prayer, and that meetings will be held to kneel and give appreciation to the Almighty Father; and let us not forget to ask of the Heavens to watch over the King who He in his benevolence has placed as a Father to the lahui of these islands in the Pacific Ocean, while He will be travelling to seek blessings for us all.

On Tuesday, November 17th, our King and the Governor of Oahu, J. O. Dominis, along with the Governor of Maui, J. M. Kapena, will go on a trip to Washington to meet with the President of the United States of America.

(Kuokoa, 11/7/1874, p. 2)

Ka la Hanau o ka Moi.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIII, Helu 5, Aoao 2. Novemaba 7, 1874.

E o, e Ka Wahine Hele La o Kaiona! 1913.

The Kamehameha Schools Celebrate the Birthday of Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop

The Kamehameha Students Come Together for the Day of Pauahi

Once again, the day of the Benevolent Alii, Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop, was commemorated on this past Friday, by the students of the Kamehameha Schools, and this makes the twenty-sixth year that it has been remembered at her grave at Maemae; there was placing of flowers, singing, and short speeches made there that day, and being that it was a nice day, everything went smoothly until finish.

At almost ten o’clock that morning, the boy students of Kamehameha and the girl students of Kamehameha arrived at Maemae, and as they disembarked from the cars, they stood in lines with the girls taking the lead, followed by the little boys and the big boys at the end. Right before the grave of Alii Wahine Pauahi, all the students stood in line, and George Andrus lead them in the song, “He Inoa no Pauahi.” It was Queen Liliuokalani who composed this himeni; and after this song, the decorating of the grave began with all varieties of flowers; the grave was so beautiful to see.

Following the placing of flowers, the students then sang a song, “Pauahi ke Alii,” and then the all the boys joined together to sing “Pauahi o Kalani.” After this song was finished, each school read memorized passages from the Bible, then after the singing of a haole mele, “Only Remembered,” the girls carried out their last remembrances, and that was the end of the prepared program, and then the hymn, “E Pili i Ou la Wau,” was sung by the Royal Hawaiian Band, and the students of the military program marched to the street where the special street cars stood waiting to take them back to the schools. That was the close of the commemoration of the day of the Chiefess Pauahi.

(Kuokoa, 12/26/1913, p. 1)

Hoomanao na Haumana o no Kula Kamehameha i ka La Hanau o Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 52, Aoao 1, Dekemaba 26, 1913.

Queen Liliuokalani’s Birthday Celebration, 1912.

[Found under: “Various News”]

Sept. 2—Queen Liliuokalani held an audience with the public at her home, Washington Place, and there were a great many people who went to give their congratulations to her, being that this was her birthday. The Queen is somewhat frail, but she gave a kind smile to all who came to visit her.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 9/5/1912, p. 3)

Sept, 2—Ua haawi ae ka Moiwahin e...

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 7, Helu 14, Aoao 3. Sept. 5, 1912.

Happy Birthday Pauahi, Ka Wahine Hele La o Kaiona! 1911.

[Found under: “Local News”]

This past Tuesday [100 years ago, on 12/19/1911], the students of the Kamehameha Schools celebrated the birthday of Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop; there were a number of cars which brought them to the cemetery at Maemae; and Queen Liliuokalani was amongst the people who arrived to see the ceremonies held at the cemetery.

(Kuokoa, 12/22/1911, p. 8)

Ma ka Poalua nei i hoomanao ae...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVII, Helu 51, Aoao 8. Dekemaba 22, 1911.

Kaiulani’s birthday, 1890.

Birthday of Kaiulani

This Thursday, October 16th, Her Highness, the Alii, Princess Victoria Kawekiu Kaiulani Lunalilo Kalaninuiahi Lapalapa, made fifteen years of age. Although the young alii whose birthday it is, is in England in pursuit of education, we hear that the Women’s Horse Riding Association of Liliuokalani commemorated this day by parading on horseback in pa-u, on the morning of the birthday; and that afternoon, there was a great celebratory feast set at Kalaepohaku under the auspices of Mr. William Auld, to celebrate the birthday of this young Princess of Hawaii nei. And we wish [ke puaaenei makou?] that the young alii’s search for education in foreign lands progresses, and her days are lengthened with ease until her return to her homeland amongst her people [mawena o ko lakou mau makaainana?]!

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 10/18/1890)

KA LA HANAU O KAIULANI

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke XIII, Helu 42, Aoao 2, Okatoba 18, 1890.

Kaiulani School celebrates Princess Kaiulani’s birthday in 1914.

Birthday of Princess Kaiulani Remembered.

Eleven-hundred and eighty-five students from six through eighteen years in age, both boys and girls of all ethnicities under the sun, celebrated the birthday of the Princess who has passed, Kaiulani, at Kaiulani School on this past Friday. The school grounds were teeming with children and parents; this celebration was not the first, but is done every year by this school; and if the young Princess were still alive, the one for whom this school is called, she would be thirty-nine years old. This is the school with the biggest enrollment in the Territory.

A program of the events of the day was prepared, and due to the small hall, some of the performances were done twice or three times before the same audience.

One of the greatest things seen in this program was the reading of a mele for Kaiulani that was composed by the present school superintendent, Henry Walworth [Walsworth] Kinney. Mr. Kinney was a news writer for one of the papers of Honolulu fifteen years ago; he was also present at the school during the festivities prepared for the day; and when Helen Duncan began to read this mele, everyone was astounded at this mele which was composed with great skill, for this mele was forgotten, but when they heard it being read again, immediately thoughts of aloha welled within them for the young princess who died.

There was a large, life-like portrait of Princess Kaiulani on a wall, which was adorned with lei of ilima and maile, while the children sang “Ka Lei o Kaiulani.” There were small speeches presented by Mr. Gerrit P. Wilder and Mrs. H. H. Webb about the life of the Princess.

Here below is the program of events:

Song—Ainahau—Mabel King on the piano.

Kaiulani—Reading……. Christian Arpe, J. Holt, Norman Alama, V. Kamakawiwoole, J. Ross, and L. Kaulukou.

Song—Lei o Kaiulani—Miss Stewart’s Class

Speeches—Gerrit P. Wilder and Mrs. H. H. Webb.

Kaiulani—Song composed by H. W. Kinney and read by Helen Duncan.

Kaiulani—Song composed by E. W. Wilcox and read by K. Rowland.

Stevenson—A story of the Princess of the Island read by Maria Prestige.

Song—Himeni, O! Hiamoe—Miss Lofquist’s Class.

Kaiulani School was built in 1889.

(Kuokoa, 10/23/1914, p. 4)

HOOMANAOIA KA LA HANAU O KE KAMALIIWAHINE KAIULANI

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LII, Helu 43, Aoao 4. Okatoba 23, 1914.