This letter to the editor of the Nuhou is interesting in so many ways. 1873.

NOT GOOD.

When I saw the newspaper Nuhou Hawaii; I was greatly gladdened to see it. When I took a close look, I was very happy. I talked with my wife, “Hey, this paper, Nuhou Hawaii, it is very good for us to subscribe to this paper.” Please don’t be upset at my bad writing. Gibson, I have much appreciation for you; at your great strength in saying that they should not give Puuloa [Pearl Harbor]. I talk in Chinese; all of Honolulu is appreciative of you. Continue reading

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Patriots celebrate La Hoihoi Ea in lands afar! 1862.

[For the Kuokoa.]

Hoihoi Ea Banquet

FOR THE HAWAIIAN NATION, ON THE 31st OF JULY, 1862.

The 31st of July is a day celebrated by the Hawaiian Nation because it is the day on which the sovereignty of the land was restored, from the year 1843 until this year in which it is remembered. Therefore, we, the natives of Hawaii who live in this strange land, because of our aloha for our land of birth, make this a day of remembrance and a day of prayer, setting aside our labors.

This is what was done on that day: Before that day, food was purchased, and in the morning of that day, the food was cooked first, and all the food was assembled on a table that was covered with the green foliage of the Puluki;¹ and when the conch was sounded, the fellow diners came and sat upon their own seats. Then L. H. Kapuaa stood and spoke of the nature of activities of the day; before the singing. This is one of the songs composed by the youths of the Snow Flurry [na keiki o ka Ehu Hau]. This is it below.

  1. Aloha i ka aina,
    I ke one hanau,
    O ke ao lewa he inoa,
    O ka Haku ka Moi,
    Na keiki kamaaina,
    Na pua ala mau,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau  hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  2. Nolaila e na hoa,
    E ku a mele pu,
    Hauoli like kakou,
    Ma keia waoakua,
    Ua nui na la i hala,
    Aole kakou i hoomanao,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  3. O Thomas ka mama,
    Ma na ale o ke kai,
    A hiki ma Hawaii,
    Kuka me ka Moi,
    Me na Luna Aupuni,
    Holo ke kuikahi,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  4. Hoopauia o Lokeoki,
    Hoi nele aku ia,
    Ka moana Pakipika,
    Hauoli Hawaii,
    I ka la hope o Iulai,
    Ala ae kakou,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  5. E ala e na keiki,
    O ka Ehu Hau,
    Mele me ka hauoli,
    Hoonani ke Akua,
    Nana kokua mai,
    Ka ea o ka aina,
    Ua hoihoi mai ke ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.

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William Haehae Heen faces racism from the United States, 1917.

RACISM.

A past issue of the Bulletin spread the news from Washington pertaining to W. H. Heen. The news being that the Senate is holding back their approval of Heen as Judge in place of Coke. The big reason behind this disapproval is that Heen is part Chinese [Hapa-pake]; where some Senators believe that this blood would not look well in a High Post in the Nation of the Unites States. How Astonishing! Continue reading

Queen Emma in New York, 1866.

THE DISTINGUISHED VISITOR.

Emma, the Queen Dowager of the Sandwich Islands, Visits Brooklyn, the Navy Yard, and Sails Down the Bay—Callers at Her Hotel Yesterday, &c.

Her Majesty of the Sandwich Islands, Emma, is determined, it would appear, to see the lions of the famed city of New York while she has the opportunity, and yesterday she extended the pardonable curiosity, which it is not scandalum magnatum to say her Majesty shares with the rest of her sex, to the sister city of Brooklyn. At half-past nine in the morning Queen Emma left her hotel, accompanied by Miss Grinnell, Miss Spurgeon, Major Hopkins, and lady-in-waiting, and drove down Broadway, to the Fulton ferry, whence Her Majesty and suite crossed to Brooklyn. The first place visited was Greenwood cemetery, with the beautiful scenery around which the party was much delighted. On the way back, they stopped at the photographic gallery in Fulton street, where the Queen sat for her portrait.

VISIT TO THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD.

Pursuant to the announcement made in yesterday’s Herald the entire party then paid a visit to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The hour appointed for her arrival was half-past one o’clock, and for one hour an assemblage of the citizens of Brooklyn and elsewhere commenced collecting until the mass numbered upwards of three thousand persons. The gates of the yard were closed to all persons except those who had passes signed by the chief officers. Half-past one arrived, but no tidings were received of the Queen. The crowd commenced to get impatient, jokes were passed to and fro to the parties on both sides of the street, when at length, at twenty minutes to two, two open carriages appeared in sight, containing the Queen, suite and attendants. It was observed as the carriages entered the yard that the first one contained her Majesty, Miss Spurgen, maid of honor; Mr. and Miss Odell; and the second Major C. Gordon Hopkins, of the Hawaiian army, and Miss Grinnell, maid of honor. As the party entered the gates the marine guard were formed in line and received her Majesty at “present arms.” She returned the compliment with a polite bow, the carriages proceeding to Admiral Bell’s quarters, in the Lyceum building. Arriving at this point the honored guest was received and assisted from her carriage by Captain Alexander M. Pennock, chief executive officer of the Navy Yard, who in turn introduced her to Rear Admiral Charles H. Bell, the commandant. The Admiral tendered his arm to the Queen, who promptly accepted it, and the party proceeded to the portico on the second story of the Lyceum. When Queen Emma alighted, the Marine battalion, commanded by Captain Collier, were drawn up in line, presented arms, while the Navy Yard band played the air of “Hail Columbia.” A detachment of the crew of the United States ship Vermont fired a salute of twenty-one guns from the Cob deck battery, and the Hawaiian flag was displayed at the main topgallant masthead. Continue reading

“Missionary Herald,” 1821–.

 Here is another reference available online. This publication was put out by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM), reporting home to America on their work throughout the world. Of particular interest to us is what they say about Hawaii. Here for instance is an article appearing in the year of the overthrow, 1893.

The position taken by the United States Secretary of State in regard to affairs at the Hawaiian Islands is simply astounding. That he should suggest that the United States interpose for the restoration of the late Hawaiian Queen seems almost incredible. Even were it admitted, as it is not, that our representatives at Hawaii afforded unwarrantable aid to the revolutionary party, it is a strange suggestion that, after this lapse of time, our government should reseat upon the throne one who had forfeited all her rights to it, and whose influence was only detrimental to the interests of the islands. The so-called royal house of Hawaii has been its curse for years. Queen Liliuokalani had yielded to the corrupting influences which every decent man had recognized as becoming more and more potent in political affairs at the islands, and by influences which she knew how to exert on the worst classes, she secured the passage of the bill giving a home on Hawaii to the infamous Louisiana Lottery which had been driven out of the United States. Restrictions upon the opium traffic, so necessary for the welfare of Hawaiians, were removed. A faithful cabinet was displaced and men of no character were placed in power. But the final act, which was practical…

(Missionary Herald, 12/1893, p. 510.)

 

The position taken...

The Missionary Herald, Volume LXXXIX, Number XII, Page 510. December 1893.

…suicide of the monarchy, was the attempt on her part to abrogate the Constitution and by sheer force establish a new one of her own making. Even her subservient ministers refused to endorse the scheme, yet she insisted upon it and sought to incite the populace to stand by her in her autocratic plans. It was then that all the better classes united as one man and deposed her. Never was there a revolution more warranted by facts, never was one more peacefully accomplished, and a queen of worthless character was set aside and the monarchy by its own act came to an end. If Minister Stevens or the commander of the Boston erred in judgment in any transaction, which we are not prepared to admit, yet there is no valid ground for the interference of our government to reverse the revolution months after it was consummated. We do not speak here of the political question as to what it is expedient for the United States to do in reference to a protectorate or to annexation. Opinions of these points may differ, but it would seem as if there were no room for difference of opinion in regard to this question of reestablishing the old monarchy on Hawaii. The best portion of her citizens have asked for some form of connection with the United States. Our government has a perfect right to say yes or no to all these proposals. And the Provisional Government at Honolulu has a right to say to us, “Either accept our proposal or hands off.” We regret to be obliged to speak in such terms of propositions that come from our national administration. We certainly should not do so did we not believe that any attempt to restore the Hawaiian Queen to her throne would be a gross outrage, and would be followed by the most serious consequences to the moral and religious interests of the islands, as well as to their material prosperity. We cannot think that our people will tolerate any intervention which has for its object the replacing upon the throne of a sovereign whose influence will be only for evil.

(Missionary Herald, 12/1893, p. 511.)

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On Aloha Aina, 1893.

“Breathes there a man with soul so dead,
Who never to himself hath said,
This is my own my native land.”
(Scott.)

Many of those who support honestly the present state of affairs, have done so in the full hope and belief, that thereby the flag of their country—the Stars and Stripes—will float over the land in perpetuity. Not a single Hawaiian, however, even those few whose signatures to annexation petitions (not 200 in number and mostly convicts.) have been bought or forced by necessity from them, desires to see any foreign flag replace his own. Continue reading