Special public schools for only English-speaking children? 1920.

MacCAUGHEY GIVES FAVORABLE OPINION OF SPECIAL SCHOOLS

Superintendent Recommends Establishment of Three Institutions For English-Speaking Children

Within a year or so Honolulu will have three schools primarily for English-speaking children, if recommendations made by Vaughan MacCaughey, superintendent of public instruction, are adopted by the department, and, since the law permits such schools, no objection is expected.

A committee of parents, representing some 400 English-speaking children, petitioned a recent meeting of the school board for the establishment of a school or schools for such children. The superintendent was authorized to investigate and submit a report and recommendations. Continue reading

The function of warships, 1856.

[Found under: “Ka Hoku Loa o Hawaii”]

What is the nature of a warship [Manuwa]?—Is it something that destroys? It is supplied with weapons of war to bring punishment upon the unethical [kolohe] lands who act unethically towards the land to whom the ship belongs. It is something that protects those who go to foreign lands to Trade, so that the way of life and trade there is protected. That is its main purpose when there is no war. Let us not be mistaken, it is something that brings destruction. Like a proper chief, it brings protection to the land, and it punishes those who are unethical in that it makes them afraid to overthrow righteousness; that is a proper warship. Continue reading

John Adams Kalahanauokalani Kalakaua Miles, 1917.

John A. K. K. Miles

In The Service of America

The picture above is of a Hawaiian boy who is working in the navy of America at St. Pedro Los Angeles as a secretary in the department of the payroll of the military. Continue reading

Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation reaches Hawaii nei, 1863.

[Found under: “KA NU HOU HOPE LOA.”]

—The President of the United States has pronounced his proclamation that the “nika” who are being enslaved in the states of the United States that rebelled will be freed, but notwithstanding the states that did not rebel; they shall give wages to their “nika,” and these are the words of the proclamation of the President:

“A no ia mea, owau o Aberahama Linekona, ka Peresidena o Amerika Huipuia, ma ka mana i haawiia mai ia’u ma ko’u ano Alihikaua o na puali koa a me na aumoku kaua, i ka wa e kipiia mai nei o Amerika Huipuia, a ma ke ano kaua hoi, i mea e hoopau ai ia kipi ana, ke hoike nei ma keia la mua o Ianuari, M. H. 1836, a e like hoi me ka’u i manao ai e pai ia ka’u olelo kuahaua mahope o kka hala ana o na la hookahi haneri, mai ka la i kakau ia’i ka olelo i haiia maluna, ke kuikahi nei i na mokuuaina a me na apana, kahi nona ka poe kanaka e noho kipi ana ia Amerika Huipuia i keia la, eia mahope nei, penei: Continue reading

Emancipation Proclamation, 1863.

NEWS BY MAL.

The Emancipation Proclamation–The Slaves of Rebels Declared Free–Blacks to be Received into the Army and Navy

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, On the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two,  a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit:

“That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom. Continue reading

This letter to the editor of the Nuhou is interesting in so many ways. 1873.

NOT GOOD.

When I saw the newspaper Nuhou Hawaii; I was greatly gladdened to see it. When I took a close look, I was very happy. I talked with my wife, “Hey, this paper, Nuhou Hawaii, it is very good for us to subscribe to this paper.” Please don’t be upset at my bad writing. Gibson, I have much appreciation for you; at your great strength in saying that they should not give Puuloa [Pearl Harbor]. I talk in Chinese; all of Honolulu is appreciative of you. Continue reading

Patriots celebrate La Hoihoi Ea in lands afar! 1862.

[For the Kuokoa.]

Hoihoi Ea Banquet

FOR THE HAWAIIAN NATION, ON THE 31st OF JULY, 1862.

The 31st of July is a day celebrated by the Hawaiian Nation because it is the day on which the sovereignty of the land was restored, from the year 1843 until this year in which it is remembered. Therefore, we, the natives of Hawaii who live in this strange land, because of our aloha for our land of birth, make this a day of remembrance and a day of prayer, setting aside our labors.

This is what was done on that day: Before that day, food was purchased, and in the morning of that day, the food was cooked first, and all the food was assembled on a table that was covered with the green foliage of the Puluki;¹ and when the conch was sounded, the fellow diners came and sat upon their own seats. Then L. H. Kapuaa stood and spoke of the nature of activities of the day; before the singing. This is one of the songs composed by the youths of the Snow Flurry [na keiki o ka Ehu Hau]. This is it below.

  1. Aloha i ka aina,
    I ke one hanau,
    O ke ao lewa he inoa,
    O ka Haku ka Moi,
    Na keiki kamaaina,
    Na pua ala mau,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau  hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  2. Nolaila e na hoa,
    E ku a mele pu,
    Hauoli like kakou,
    Ma keia waoakua,
    Ua nui na la i hala,
    Aole kakou i hoomanao,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  3. O Thomas ka mama,
    Ma na ale o ke kai,
    A hiki ma Hawaii,
    Kuka me ka Moi,
    Me na Luna Aupuni,
    Holo ke kuikahi,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  4. Hoopauia o Lokeoki,
    Hoi nele aku ia,
    Ka moana Pakipika,
    Hauoli Hawaii,
    I ka la hope o Iulai,
    Ala ae kakou,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  5. E ala e na keiki,
    O ka Ehu Hau,
    Mele me ka hauoli,
    Hoonani ke Akua,
    Nana kokua mai,
    Ka ea o ka aina,
    Ua hoihoi mai ke ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.

Continue reading

William Haehae Heen faces racism from the United States, 1917.

RACISM.

A past issue of the Bulletin spread the news from Washington pertaining to W. H. Heen. The news being that the Senate is holding back their approval of Heen as Judge in place of Coke. The big reason behind this disapproval is that Heen is part Chinese [Hapa-pake]; where some Senators believe that this blood would not look well in a High Post in the Nation of the Unites States. How Astonishing! Continue reading

Queen Emma in New York, 1866.

THE DISTINGUISHED VISITOR.

Emma, the Queen Dowager of the Sandwich Islands, Visits Brooklyn, the Navy Yard, and Sails Down the Bay—Callers at Her Hotel Yesterday, &c.

Her Majesty of the Sandwich Islands, Emma, is determined, it would appear, to see the lions of the famed city of New York while she has the opportunity, and yesterday she extended the pardonable curiosity, which it is not scandalum magnatum to say her Majesty shares with the rest of her sex, to the sister city of Brooklyn. At half-past nine in the morning Queen Emma left her hotel, accompanied by Miss Grinnell, Miss Spurgeon, Major Hopkins, and lady-in-waiting, and drove down Broadway, to the Fulton ferry, whence Her Majesty and suite crossed to Brooklyn. The first place visited was Greenwood cemetery, with the beautiful scenery around which the party was much delighted. On the way back, they stopped at the photographic gallery in Fulton street, where the Queen sat for her portrait.

VISIT TO THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD.

Pursuant to the announcement made in yesterday’s Herald the entire party then paid a visit to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The hour appointed for her arrival was half-past one o’clock, and for one hour an assemblage of the citizens of Brooklyn and elsewhere commenced collecting until the mass numbered upwards of three thousand persons. The gates of the yard were closed to all persons except those who had passes signed by the chief officers. Half-past one arrived, but no tidings were received of the Queen. The crowd commenced to get impatient, jokes were passed to and fro to the parties on both sides of the street, when at length, at twenty minutes to two, two open carriages appeared in sight, containing the Queen, suite and attendants. It was observed as the carriages entered the yard that the first one contained her Majesty, Miss Spurgen, maid of honor; Mr. and Miss Odell; and the second Major C. Gordon Hopkins, of the Hawaiian army, and Miss Grinnell, maid of honor. As the party entered the gates the marine guard were formed in line and received her Majesty at “present arms.” She returned the compliment with a polite bow, the carriages proceeding to Admiral Bell’s quarters, in the Lyceum building. Arriving at this point the honored guest was received and assisted from her carriage by Captain Alexander M. Pennock, chief executive officer of the Navy Yard, who in turn introduced her to Rear Admiral Charles H. Bell, the commandant. The Admiral tendered his arm to the Queen, who promptly accepted it, and the party proceeded to the portico on the second story of the Lyceum. When Queen Emma alighted, the Marine battalion, commanded by Captain Collier, were drawn up in line, presented arms, while the Navy Yard band played the air of “Hail Columbia.” A detachment of the crew of the United States ship Vermont fired a salute of twenty-one guns from the Cob deck battery, and the Hawaiian flag was displayed at the main topgallant masthead. Continue reading