Reverend James Kekela plaque at Kawaiahao Church, 2013.

REVEREND JAMES KEKELA

KEKELA O KA LANI

BORN IN 1824 AT MOKULEIA OAHU

EDUCATED BY JAMES HUNNEWELL AT LAHAINALUNA

FIRST HAWAIIAN CHRISTIAN MINISTER

ORDAINED AT KAHUKU DECEMBER 21 1849

IN 1853 HE WENT AS A PIONEER MISSIONARY TO THE MARQUESAS ISLANDS WHERE FOR 49 YEARS HE EXERCISED A REMARKABLE INFLUENCE AGAINST CANNIBALISM AND TRIBAL WARFARE

A TRUE SPIRITUAL GUIDE

IN 1864 HE WAS SIGNALLY REWARDED BY

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

FOR RESCUING AN AMERICAN SEAMAN FROM CANNIBALS

DIED IN HONOLULU NOVEMBER 1904

“O KE ALOHA, OIA KA MOLE O NA MEA PONO A ME NA MEA OIAIO A PAU”

LOVE IS THE ROOT OF ALL THAT IS GOOD AND TRUE

KEKELA

[Kekela is buried in the cemetery of Kawaiahao Church in front of his daughter Maria. His wife Naomi however is buried at the Waianae Church.]

(Kawaiahao Church)

Kawaiahao Church

Rev. James Kekela Plaque, Kawaiahao Church

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James Kekela retires, 1899.

A HAWAIIAN MISSIONARY.

After fifty years of the Rev. James Kekela and his wife carrying out missionary work, and after forty-six years of them telling the Gospel of Christ [Euanelio o Karisto] in the Marquesas [Makuisa], here they are returning to spend the rest of their days here in their homeland.

They are being accompanied by their children and grandchildren totalling 14. According to the last word heard, they will be carried by a schooner of 50 tons, chartered to return them home. This month they will leave the Marquesas, and in March they will arrive here. According to what the newspaper the Friend published about Kekela and his fellow missionaries:

Their good works which they have done have spread wide. Kekela was honored by Lincoln when he tried to save the life of an American officer [Jonathan Whalon].

Kekela, Kauwealoha, and Hapuku civilized the ignorant of the Marquesas, and their fame has spread to Tahiti and the colonies of France in the South and East Pacific.

Kauwealoha has no children, and will live there until he dies; but for Kekela, he has a big family, and according to his friends, he is bringing back a part of his family to the land of his birth.

[There are many many letters in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers throughout the years from the Marquesas Islands written by these Hawaiian missionaries: James Kekela, Zachariah Hapuku, and Samuel Kauwealoha.]

(Aloha Aina, 2/18/1899, p. 5)

HE MISIONARI HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke V, Helu 7, Aoao 5. Feberuari 18, 1899.

Abraham Lincoln, 1906–07.

ABE LINCOLN
—°—THE AMERICAN COUNTRY BOY—°—
THE REDEEMER OF THE BLACK SLAVES

CHAPTER I.

HIS FIRST DAY AT SCHOOL.

One fine day, when the hills and vales were covered with the light of the morning, this little child came out of a log cabin. Log cabins were the houses of the poor country people of this area, and this is how they are built….

[This is the opening of one of several biographies of Abraham Lincoln published throughout the years in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers. This particular one runs in the Kuokoa from 7/27/1906 to 1/18/1907.  Linekona was followed closely through life and death and beyond in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers. Perhaps of any president of the United States, he is the one most written about and most respected for his stance and for the actions he took to promote these beliefs.

There is an article announcing the beginning of this story appearing in the previous issue of the Kuokoa, 7/20/1906, p. 4: “PERESIDENA LINEKONA, KE KEIKI KUAAINA”.]

(Kuokoa, 7/27/1906, p. 6)

ABE LINEKONA: KE KEIKI KUAAINA AMERIKA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 30, Aoao 6. Iulai 27, 1906.