Hiram R. Nalau writes from California, 1863.

A Letter from California.

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha kaua:

As you passed by and entered my home in this land where I am living as a malihini, and I gazed to see the wealth contained in your patient bowels, and the freight you carried from our land of birth, and I saw and was appreciative, and my eyes were satiated seeing, and my ears were full from listening. Continue reading

Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation reaches Hawaii nei, 1863.

[Found under: “KA NU HOU HOPE LOA.”]

—The President of the United States has pronounced his proclamation that the “nika” who are being enslaved in the states of the United States that rebelled will be freed, but notwithstanding the states that did not rebel; they shall give wages to their “nika,” and these are the words of the proclamation of the President:

“A no ia mea, owau o Aberahama Linekona, ka Peresidena o Amerika Huipuia, ma ka mana i haawiia mai ia’u ma ko’u ano Alihikaua o na puali koa a me na aumoku kaua, i ka wa e kipiia mai nei o Amerika Huipuia, a ma ke ano kaua hoi, i mea e hoopau ai ia kipi ana, ke hoike nei ma keia la mua o Ianuari, M. H. 1836, a e like hoi me ka’u i manao ai e pai ia ka’u olelo kuahaua mahope o kka hala ana o na la hookahi haneri, mai ka la i kakau ia’i ka olelo i haiia maluna, ke kuikahi nei i na mokuuaina a me na apana, kahi nona ka poe kanaka e noho kipi ana ia Amerika Huipuia i keia la, eia mahope nei, penei: Continue reading

Emancipation Proclamation, 1863.

NEWS BY MAL.

The Emancipation Proclamation–The Slaves of Rebels Declared Free–Blacks to be Received into the Army and Navy

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, On the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two,  a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit:

“That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom. Continue reading

Hawaiians in the Marquesas Islands, 2002.

Our Honolulu

By Bob Krauss

Letters tell of forgotten Hawaiians

HIVA OA, Marquesas Islands—At Atuona, a tattooed Marquesas wearing a “Aranui Crew” tank-top pointed from the cargo deck down the pier and shouted, “Hawaiian.”

We walked over to a medium-sized man beside a pickup loaded with copra andshook hands with James Kekela. He is the descendant and namesake of a Hawaiian missionary to the Marquesas who was honored by President Abraham Lincoln for saving an American sailor from the cannibal pot. Continue reading

Reverend James Kekela plaque at Kawaiahao Church, 2013.

REVEREND JAMES KEKELA

KEKELA O KA LANI

BORN IN 1824 AT MOKULEIA OAHU

EDUCATED BY JAMES HUNNEWELL AT LAHAINALUNA

FIRST HAWAIIAN CHRISTIAN MINISTER

ORDAINED AT KAHUKU DECEMBER 21 1849

IN 1853 HE WENT AS A PIONEER MISSIONARY TO THE MARQUESAS ISLANDS WHERE FOR 49 YEARS HE EXERCISED A REMARKABLE INFLUENCE AGAINST CANNIBALISM AND TRIBAL WARFARE

A TRUE SPIRITUAL GUIDE

IN 1864 HE WAS SIGNALLY REWARDED BY

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

FOR RESCUING AN AMERICAN SEAMAN FROM CANNIBALS

DIED IN HONOLULU NOVEMBER 1904

“O KE ALOHA, OIA KA MOLE O NA MEA PONO A ME NA MEA OIAIO A PAU”

LOVE IS THE ROOT OF ALL THAT IS GOOD AND TRUE

KEKELA

[Kekela is buried in the cemetery of Kawaiahao Church in front of his daughter Maria. His wife Naomi however is buried at the Waianae Church.]

(Kawaiahao Church)

Kawaiahao Church

Rev. James Kekela Plaque, Kawaiahao Church

James Kekela retires, 1899.

A HAWAIIAN MISSIONARY.

After fifty years of the Rev. James Kekela and his wife carrying out missionary work, and after forty-six years of them telling the Gospel of Christ [Euanelio o Karisto] in the Marquesas [Makuisa], here they are returning to spend the rest of their days here in their homeland.

They are being accompanied by their children and grandchildren totalling 14. According to the last word heard, they will be carried by a schooner of 50 tons, chartered to return them home. This month they will leave the Marquesas, and in March they will arrive here. According to what the newspaper the Friend published about Kekela and his fellow missionaries:

Their good works which they have done have spread wide. Kekela was honored by Lincoln when he tried to save the life of an American officer [Jonathan Whalon].

Kekela, Kauwealoha, and Hapuku civilized the ignorant of the Marquesas, and their fame has spread to Tahiti and the colonies of France in the South and East Pacific.

Kauwealoha has no children, and will live there until he dies; but for Kekela, he has a big family, and according to his friends, he is bringing back a part of his family to the land of his birth.

[There are many many letters in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers throughout the years from the Marquesas Islands written by these Hawaiian missionaries: James Kekela, Zachariah Hapuku, and Samuel Kauwealoha.]

(Aloha Aina, 2/18/1899, p. 5)

HE MISIONARI HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke V, Helu 7, Aoao 5. Feberuari 18, 1899.

Abraham Lincoln, 1906–07.

ABE LINCOLN
—°—THE AMERICAN COUNTRY BOY—°—
THE REDEEMER OF THE BLACK SLAVES

CHAPTER I.

HIS FIRST DAY AT SCHOOL.

One fine day, when the hills and vales were covered with the light of the morning, this little child came out of a log cabin. Log cabins were the houses of the poor country people of this area, and this is how they are built….

[This is the opening of one of several biographies of Abraham Lincoln published throughout the years in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers. This particular one runs in the Kuokoa from 7/27/1906 to 1/18/1907.  Linekona was followed closely through life and death and beyond in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers. Perhaps of any president of the United States, he is the one most written about and most respected for his stance and for the actions he took to promote these beliefs.

There is an article announcing the beginning of this story appearing in the previous issue of the Kuokoa, 7/20/1906, p. 4: “PERESIDENA LINEKONA, KE KEIKI KUAAINA”.]

(Kuokoa, 7/27/1906, p. 6)

ABE LINEKONA: KE KEIKI KUAAINA AMERIKA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 30, Aoao 6. Iulai 27, 1906.