Charles Reed Bishop honored at Kamehameha Schools, 1946.

Arrived 100 Years Ago

Kamehameha To Honor Memory Of C. R. Bishop

Charles Reed Bishop, a builder of Hawaii in the field of education as well as business during the 19th century, and who arrived in the Hawaiian Islands 100 years ago this week, on October 12, 1846, will be remembered at centennial services at the Kamehameha Schools Friday and Saturday. Continue reading

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Early story from Joseph Nawahi, 1861.

An amazing thief!

In a certain town there lived three blind men, and they were seen often by the people of the place. What they did was walk the streets asking for money, food, and other things they needed for their livelihood there. Doing so, they received a lot of money from help given them by the wealthy and due to the aloha from others. They took the money they made everyday and put it in a strong box, and when they left the money, they left the bags as well. One day, they went and came back with bags full of money; the amazing thief saw all that money of the blind men, that there was so much, and he followed them thinking that he would steal it, because he thought they were blind and would not see him steal it, so he approached the blind men when they were entering their house, and when they got to the door, one of the blind men unlocked the door and it opened, and they went in without seeing him, and they immediately locked the door. The blind men opened the money box to count, for they always counted what they had made previously and what they made anew. Continue reading

Queen Emma in New York, 1866.

THE DISTINGUISHED VISITOR.

Emma, the Queen Dowager of the Sandwich Islands, Visits Brooklyn, the Navy Yard, and Sails Down the Bay—Callers at Her Hotel Yesterday, &c.

Her Majesty of the Sandwich Islands, Emma, is determined, it would appear, to see the lions of the famed city of New York while she has the opportunity, and yesterday she extended the pardonable curiosity, which it is not scandalum magnatum to say her Majesty shares with the rest of her sex, to the sister city of Brooklyn. At half-past nine in the morning Queen Emma left her hotel, accompanied by Miss Grinnell, Miss Spurgeon, Major Hopkins, and lady-in-waiting, and drove down Broadway, to the Fulton ferry, whence Her Majesty and suite crossed to Brooklyn. The first place visited was Greenwood cemetery, with the beautiful scenery around which the party was much delighted. On the way back, they stopped at the photographic gallery in Fulton street, where the Queen sat for her portrait.

VISIT TO THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD.

Pursuant to the announcement made in yesterday’s Herald the entire party then paid a visit to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The hour appointed for her arrival was half-past one o’clock, and for one hour an assemblage of the citizens of Brooklyn and elsewhere commenced collecting until the mass numbered upwards of three thousand persons. The gates of the yard were closed to all persons except those who had passes signed by the chief officers. Half-past one arrived, but no tidings were received of the Queen. The crowd commenced to get impatient, jokes were passed to and fro to the parties on both sides of the street, when at length, at twenty minutes to two, two open carriages appeared in sight, containing the Queen, suite and attendants. It was observed as the carriages entered the yard that the first one contained her Majesty, Miss Spurgen, maid of honor; Mr. and Miss Odell; and the second Major C. Gordon Hopkins, of the Hawaiian army, and Miss Grinnell, maid of honor. As the party entered the gates the marine guard were formed in line and received her Majesty at “present arms.” She returned the compliment with a polite bow, the carriages proceeding to Admiral Bell’s quarters, in the Lyceum building. Arriving at this point the honored guest was received and assisted from her carriage by Captain Alexander M. Pennock, chief executive officer of the Navy Yard, who in turn introduced her to Rear Admiral Charles H. Bell, the commandant. The Admiral tendered his arm to the Queen, who promptly accepted it, and the party proceeded to the portico on the second story of the Lyceum. When Queen Emma alighted, the Marine battalion, commanded by Captain Collier, were drawn up in line, presented arms, while the Navy Yard band played the air of “Hail Columbia.” A detachment of the crew of the United States ship Vermont fired a salute of twenty-one guns from the Cob deck battery, and the Hawaiian flag was displayed at the main topgallant masthead. Continue reading

Short biography of the great Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe, 1912.

JOSEPH MOKUOHAI POEPOE

This candidate for the legislature in the Democratic party of Oahu nei was born at Honomakau, which is famous for the saying: “No youth of Kohala goes out unprepared” [“Aohe u’i hele wale o Kohala”]. This also is the birthplace of the Hon. H. M. Kaniho. He was born on the 27th of March, 1852. When he was small, he was brought to Honolulu. He entered into the districts schools [kula apana] here in Honolulu, and also in Kalauao, Ewa. And thereafter he attended the Royal School at Kehehuna, and its head Instructor was Mr. Beckwith. After two years there, he entered Ahuimanu College in Koolaupoko, under the instruction of the Fathers Elekenio, Remona, Livino, and the many other teachers. He was taught law in North Kohala under Judge P. Kamakaia. He returned here to Honolulu and studied law at the law school of W. R. Castle [W. R. Kakela], as well as at the law school of S. B. Dole. He studied law with lawyers Davidson and Lukela. In 1884, he received his full license to practice law in all Courts of Hawaii nei, and he still retains his law license. He was an editor for many of the Hawaiian-language newspapers in this town. Currently, he is the editor for KE ALOHA AINA. He was a teacher at the boarding school of Rev. E. Bond [Rev. E. Bona] in Kohala. He was the first to establish an English language school in North Kohala, Hawaii. He was an assistant teacher at the British Government School at Ainakea, under H. P. Wood, and thereafter under E. N. Dyer. For many years he tried to join the Legislature, so that the lahui would see him pass laws that would benefit the lahui in need; but the people did not assent. Now his hope is that it will be in the upcoming election that the voters will come through, making him a Representative, whereupon he will show his works for the good of the land and for the advancement of the lahui.

[Poepoe played a huge part in the history of the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers! I was happy to find this. Also, I just saw this morning more on the Catholic school at Ahuimanu on Nanea Armstrong-Wassel’s instagram page. Go check it out. There is a picture of the school as well!]

(Aloha Aina, 10/26/1912, p. 1)

AlohaAina_10_26_1912_1.png

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII, Helu 43, Aoao 1. Okatoba 26, 1912.

Vote for John B. Enos (Enoka), 1914.

J. B. ENOS (Enoka)

CANDIDATE FOR SUPERVISOR

As a Republican candidate in the primary election.

John B. Enos is one of the candidates running for the position of supervisor [lunakiai] in this election season; he is not a stranger before you, O voting people of this county. He ran as a supervisor candidate in the last season and lost, but that is not something that made him step backwards; your support is greatly sought after in this primary election.

He was born in Makiki and educated at Royal School in Kehehuna, and graduated from that school; and he was married to one of the fine blossoms of his homeland, and he is working at his own painting business with only Hawaiian employees. This shows his true Hawaiian-ness, and his love for his fellow Hawaiians. Don’t forget him as the candidate for this coming primary election.

(Holomua, 9/12/1914, p. 5)

J. B. ENOS (Enoka)

Ka Holomua, Buke I, Helu 50, Aoao 5. Sepatemaba 12, 1914.

Schools in Hawaii nei, 1844.

[Found under: “KA AHAOLELO MISIONARI.”]

II. The Schools. Lahainaluna College: there were 135 students enrolled in the school just recently. Six of them are studying the apostles of God with Dibela [Dibble]. In April, 30 students graduated, four died, three went home because of illness, and three were expelled for rule violations; that leaves 97 remaining at the school.

They are being taught by three teachers, Dibble, Emesona [Emerson], and Alekanedero [Alexander], in penmanship, in music, math, geography, algebra, surveying, theology, philosophy, composition, and speech. Some study in English, others study in the word of God.

College at Wailuku. The teachers at the school are Bele me kana wahine [Mr. and Mrs. Bailey] and Mi. Okana [Miss Ogden]; there are 47 students living there and eight are married. At the school is taught reading, penmanship, geography, math, philosophy, theology, spirituality and actual work.

Boarding School at Hilo. Laimana laua me kana wahine [Lyman and his wife] are the teachers. There are sixty students at the school; 37 of them have become members in the church. The instruction is like that of the Colleges at Wailuku and Lahainaluna; however they are not progressing far in the difficult subjects like at Lahainaluna.

Girls’ School at Hilo. Koanawahine [Mrs. Coan] is the teacher; most of the food is donated by the church members in Hilo. There are 26 students; there of them are married to husbands, 21 of them have joined the church.

Boarding School of the Alii. Kuke laua me kana wahine [Cooke and his wife] are the teachers. They are instructed only in the English language. The government sponsors this school, and supplies all necessities. It is doing well currently: the students are obedient and are progressing in their knowledge.

Missionary School at Punahou. Dola [Dole] and Kamika wahine [Mrs. Smith] and Rise laua me kana wahine [Rice and wife] are the teachers. There are 24 students at the school. This school is solely for the American missionaries.

Select Schools. There is one in Waioli under Ioane [Johnson]. There are 63 students. It is not a boarding school. The students put effort into working, and it is from this that they get their supplies, and the church members give assistance as well.

In Hilo is another select school. There are 70 students, and Wilikoke [Wilcox] is the teacher. But he might have gone to Waialua to live.

In Kohala is another. Bona [Bond] is the teacher; there are 12 students; there is schooling for teachers there also.

There is a select school at Hana. Rice was the teacher, but he has returned to Punahou now. There were recently 30 students.

Small Schools. In these Islands there are 330 schools; 270 teachers; 12,762 students; 4,000 children can read, 2,100 can write; 5,800 can do math; 1,850 know geography.

[The state of the schools in Hawaii nei was part of what was discussed at a missionary conference held in 1844. This description starts with “II.” because i left the first part of the discussion out which was “I. Pertaining to the Church“.
It would be very helpful if there was online a “comprehensive” list of all variant names for people, like these for many of the missionaries which was published in the Elele Hawaii in 1848.]

(Nonanona, 7/9/1844, pp. 35–36.)

II. Na Kula.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 6, Aoao 35. Iulai 9, 1844.

Ma Hilo...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 6, Aoao 36. Iulai 9, 1844.

Monument to Kauikeaouli on his 100th birthday, 1914.

UNVEILING OF THE DONATED TABLET

The Populace Gathers in Kawaiahao on the Evening of this Past Tuesday.

It was a scene from the sacred times when the Islands were ruled under monarchs, that was before a great crowd of people which arrived at Kawaiahao Church in the afternoon of this past Tuesday, when a memorial service for the hundredth birthday of King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III was held, and unveiled was the stone tablet dedicated to him that will be stood at the place of his birth at Keauhou, North Kona, Hawaii.

Before the hour set aside for that remembrance, at four o’clock in the afternoon, the crowd entered the church: from the members of the organizations of this town, the students of the Kamehameha Schools, the heads of the government, to the general public, filled up the church, with some people standing.

Outside of the church grounds was the Royal Hawaiian Band entertaining the people, with a majority of the people there, because they could not get a seat in the church.

Before the pulpit stood a painting of King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, and right below the painting was the tablet with clear lettering that said: “Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, ke keiki a Kamehameha III ame Keopuolani. Hanauia i Maraki 17,1814. Ka Moi lokomaikai.”

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