Charles Reed Bishop honored at Kamehameha Schools, 1946.

Arrived 100 Years Ago

Kamehameha To Honor Memory Of C. R. Bishop

Charles Reed Bishop, a builder of Hawaii in the field of education as well as business during the 19th century, and who arrived in the Hawaiian Islands 100 years ago this week, on October 12, 1846, will be remembered at centennial services at the Kamehameha Schools Friday and Saturday. Continue reading

Early story from Joseph Nawahi, 1861.

An amazing thief!

In a certain town there lived three blind men, and they were seen often by the people of the place. What they did was walk the streets asking for money, food, and other things they needed for their livelihood there. Doing so, they received a lot of money from help given them by the wealthy and due to the aloha from others. They took the money they made everyday and put it in a strong box, and when they left the money, they left the bags as well. One day, they went and came back with bags full of money; the amazing thief saw all that money of the blind men, that there was so much, and he followed them thinking that he would steal it, because he thought they were blind and would not see him steal it, so he approached the blind men when they were entering their house, and when they got to the door, one of the blind men unlocked the door and it opened, and they went in without seeing him, and they immediately locked the door. The blind men opened the money box to count, for they always counted what they had made previously and what they made anew. Continue reading

Queen Emma in New York, 1866.

THE DISTINGUISHED VISITOR.

Emma, the Queen Dowager of the Sandwich Islands, Visits Brooklyn, the Navy Yard, and Sails Down the Bay—Callers at Her Hotel Yesterday, &c.

Her Majesty of the Sandwich Islands, Emma, is determined, it would appear, to see the lions of the famed city of New York while she has the opportunity, and yesterday she extended the pardonable curiosity, which it is not scandalum magnatum to say her Majesty shares with the rest of her sex, to the sister city of Brooklyn. At half-past nine in the morning Queen Emma left her hotel, accompanied by Miss Grinnell, Miss Spurgeon, Major Hopkins, and lady-in-waiting, and drove down Broadway, to the Fulton ferry, whence Her Majesty and suite crossed to Brooklyn. The first place visited was Greenwood cemetery, with the beautiful scenery around which the party was much delighted. On the way back, they stopped at the photographic gallery in Fulton street, where the Queen sat for her portrait.

VISIT TO THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD.

Pursuant to the announcement made in yesterday’s Herald the entire party then paid a visit to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The hour appointed for her arrival was half-past one o’clock, and for one hour an assemblage of the citizens of Brooklyn and elsewhere commenced collecting until the mass numbered upwards of three thousand persons. The gates of the yard were closed to all persons except those who had passes signed by the chief officers. Half-past one arrived, but no tidings were received of the Queen. The crowd commenced to get impatient, jokes were passed to and fro to the parties on both sides of the street, when at length, at twenty minutes to two, two open carriages appeared in sight, containing the Queen, suite and attendants. It was observed as the carriages entered the yard that the first one contained her Majesty, Miss Spurgen, maid of honor; Mr. and Miss Odell; and the second Major C. Gordon Hopkins, of the Hawaiian army, and Miss Grinnell, maid of honor. As the party entered the gates the marine guard were formed in line and received her Majesty at “present arms.” She returned the compliment with a polite bow, the carriages proceeding to Admiral Bell’s quarters, in the Lyceum building. Arriving at this point the honored guest was received and assisted from her carriage by Captain Alexander M. Pennock, chief executive officer of the Navy Yard, who in turn introduced her to Rear Admiral Charles H. Bell, the commandant. The Admiral tendered his arm to the Queen, who promptly accepted it, and the party proceeded to the portico on the second story of the Lyceum. When Queen Emma alighted, the Marine battalion, commanded by Captain Collier, were drawn up in line, presented arms, while the Navy Yard band played the air of “Hail Columbia.” A detachment of the crew of the United States ship Vermont fired a salute of twenty-one guns from the Cob deck battery, and the Hawaiian flag was displayed at the main topgallant masthead. Continue reading

Short biography of the great Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe, 1912.

JOSEPH MOKUOHAI POEPOE

This candidate for the legislature in the Democratic party of Oahu nei was born at Honomakau, which is famous for the saying: “No youth of Kohala goes out unprepared” [“Aohe u’i hele wale o Kohala”]. This also is the birthplace of the Hon. H. M. Kaniho. He was born on the 27th of March, 1852. When he was small, he was brought to Honolulu. He entered into the districts schools [kula apana] here in Honolulu, and also in Kalauao, Ewa. And thereafter he attended the Royal School at Kehehuna, and its head Instructor was Mr. Beckwith. After two years there, he entered Ahuimanu College in Koolaupoko, under the instruction of the Fathers Elekenio, Remona, Livino, and the many other teachers. He was taught law in North Kohala under Judge P. Kamakaia. He returned here to Honolulu and studied law at the law school of W. R. Castle [W. R. Kakela], as well as at the law school of S. B. Dole. He studied law with lawyers Davidson and Lukela. In 1884, he received his full license to practice law in all Courts of Hawaii nei, and he still retains his law license. He was an editor for many of the Hawaiian-language newspapers in this town. Currently, he is the editor for KE ALOHA AINA. He was a teacher at the boarding school of Rev. E. Bond [Rev. E. Bona] in Kohala. He was the first to establish an English language school in North Kohala, Hawaii. He was an assistant teacher at the British Government School at Ainakea, under H. P. Wood, and thereafter under E. N. Dyer. For many years he tried to join the Legislature, so that the lahui would see him pass laws that would benefit the lahui in need; but the people did not assent. Now his hope is that it will be in the upcoming election that the voters will come through, making him a Representative, whereupon he will show his works for the good of the land and for the advancement of the lahui.

[Poepoe played a huge part in the history of the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers! I was happy to find this. Also, I just saw this morning more on the Catholic school at Ahuimanu on Nanea Armstrong-Wassel’s instagram page. Go check it out. There is a picture of the school as well!]

(Aloha Aina, 10/26/1912, p. 1)

AlohaAina_10_26_1912_1.png

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII, Helu 43, Aoao 1. Okatoba 26, 1912.

Vote for John B. Enos (Enoka), 1914.

J. B. ENOS (Enoka)

CANDIDATE FOR SUPERVISOR

As a Republican candidate in the primary election.

John B. Enos is one of the candidates running for the position of supervisor [lunakiai] in this election season; he is not a stranger before you, O voting people of this county. He ran as a supervisor candidate in the last season and lost, but that is not something that made him step backwards; your support is greatly sought after in this primary election.

He was born in Makiki and educated at Royal School in Kehehuna, and graduated from that school; and he was married to one of the fine blossoms of his homeland, and he is working at his own painting business with only Hawaiian employees. This shows his true Hawaiian-ness, and his love for his fellow Hawaiians. Don’t forget him as the candidate for this coming primary election.

(Holomua, 9/12/1914, p. 5)

J. B. ENOS (Enoka)

Ka Holomua, Buke I, Helu 50, Aoao 5. Sepatemaba 12, 1914.

Schools in Hawaii nei, 1844.

[Found under: “KA AHAOLELO MISIONARI.”]

II. The Schools. Lahainaluna College: there were 135 students enrolled in the school just recently. Six of them are studying the apostles of God with Dibela [Dibble]. In April, 30 students graduated, four died, three went home because of illness, and three were expelled for rule violations; that leaves 97 remaining at the school.

They are being taught by three teachers, Dibble, Emesona [Emerson], and Alekanedero [Alexander], in penmanship, in music, math, geography, algebra, surveying, theology, philosophy, composition, and speech. Some study in English, others study in the word of God.

College at Wailuku. The teachers at the school are Bele me kana wahine [Mr. and Mrs. Bailey] and Mi. Okana [Miss Ogden]; there are 47 students living there and eight are married. At the school is taught reading, penmanship, geography, math, philosophy, theology, spirituality and actual work.

Boarding School at Hilo. Laimana laua me kana wahine [Lyman and his wife] are the teachers. There are sixty students at the school; 37 of them have become members in the church. The instruction is like that of the Colleges at Wailuku and Lahainaluna; however they are not progressing far in the difficult subjects like at Lahainaluna.

Girls’ School at Hilo. Koanawahine [Mrs. Coan] is the teacher; most of the food is donated by the church members in Hilo. There are 26 students; there of them are married to husbands, 21 of them have joined the church.

Boarding School of the Alii. Kuke laua me kana wahine [Cooke and his wife] are the teachers. They are instructed only in the English language. The government sponsors this school, and supplies all necessities. It is doing well currently: the students are obedient and are progressing in their knowledge.

Missionary School at Punahou. Dola [Dole] and Kamika wahine [Mrs. Smith] and Rise laua me kana wahine [Rice and wife] are the teachers. There are 24 students at the school. This school is solely for the American missionaries.

Select Schools. There is one in Waioli under Ioane [Johnson]. There are 63 students. It is not a boarding school. The students put effort into working, and it is from this that they get their supplies, and the church members give assistance as well.

In Hilo is another select school. There are 70 students, and Wilikoke [Wilcox] is the teacher. But he might have gone to Waialua to live.

In Kohala is another. Bona [Bond] is the teacher; there are 12 students; there is schooling for teachers there also.

There is a select school at Hana. Rice was the teacher, but he has returned to Punahou now. There were recently 30 students.

Small Schools. In these Islands there are 330 schools; 270 teachers; 12,762 students; 4,000 children can read, 2,100 can write; 5,800 can do math; 1,850 know geography.

[The state of the schools in Hawaii nei was part of what was discussed at a missionary conference held in 1844. This description starts with “II.” because i left the first part of the discussion out which was “I. Pertaining to the Church“.
It would be very helpful if there was online a “comprehensive” list of all variant names for people, like these for many of the missionaries which was published in the Elele Hawaii in 1848.]

(Nonanona, 7/9/1844, pp. 35–36.)

II. Na Kula.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 6, Aoao 35. Iulai 9, 1844.

Ma Hilo...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 6, Aoao 36. Iulai 9, 1844.

Monument to Kauikeaouli on his 100th birthday, 1914.

UNVEILING OF THE DONATED TABLET

The Populace Gathers in Kawaiahao on the Evening of this Past Tuesday.

It was a scene from the sacred times when the Islands were ruled under monarchs, that was before a great crowd of people which arrived at Kawaiahao Church in the afternoon of this past Tuesday, when a memorial service for the hundredth birthday of King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III was held, and unveiled was the stone tablet dedicated to him that will be stood at the place of his birth at Keauhou, North Kona, Hawaii.

Before the hour set aside for that remembrance, at four o’clock in the afternoon, the crowd entered the church: from the members of the organizations of this town, the students of the Kamehameha Schools, the heads of the government, to the general public, filled up the church, with some people standing.

Outside of the church grounds was the Royal Hawaiian Band entertaining the people, with a majority of the people there, because they could not get a seat in the church.

Before the pulpit stood a painting of King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, and right below the painting was the tablet with clear lettering that said: “Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, ke keiki a Kamehameha III ame Keopuolani. Hanauia i Maraki 17,1814. Ka Moi lokomaikai.”

Continue reading

The Chiefs’ Children’s School and its beginnings. 1844.

Schools and Seminaries.—In the very important point of providing instruction for all classes, as in every other duty connected with their sacred calling, the missionaries stand prominent. With them, I believe, resides the merit of having excited the chiefs to desire a school for the systematic education of their children of both sexes. With the concurrence of the king and chiefs, in 1839, the American mission selected for that purpose Mr. & Mrs. Cooke, who were assistant missionaries. Having lately at the request of Dr. Judd, visited the school daily, to watch the progress of a disease, bearing more resemblance to the “typhus mitior” of “Cullen,” than any other known types of fever, I have been an eye-witness to the anxious and parental-like care of Mr. & Mrs. Cooke, both of the sick and healthy children of the chiefs; and I am prepared to state from observation, that a more proper selection could not have been made.

The school-room is very commodiously arranged. Strict order and obedience are observed, without any exertion of authority approaching to harshness. Books, maps, stationery, gloves (terrestrial and celestial,) are at all times within the access of the scholars, and there is an excellent apparatus to illustrate the movements of the planets which compose our solar system.

(Friend, August 1, 1844, p. 35)

37. Schools and Seminaries.

The Friend, Volume II, Number VIII, Page 35. August 1, 1844.

The following is a list of the young chiefs at present in the school of Mr. and Mrs. Cooke:

NAMES. WHEN BORN FATHER MOTHER ADOPTED BY
*Alexander Liholiho, 9 Feb. 1834. Kekuanaoa. Kinau. Kamehameha III.
†Moses Kekuaiwa, 20 July 1829. ditto. ditto. Kaieoewa [Kaikioewa].
‡Lot Kamehameha, 11 Dec. 1830. ditto. ditto. Hoapili.
‖William Charles Lunalilo, 31 Jan. 1835. Kanaina. **Kekauluohi.
Peter Young Kaeo, 4 March 1836. Kaeo. Lahilahi. John Young.
James Kaliokalani, 29 May 1835. Pakea [Kapaakea]. Keohokalole. Aikanaka.
David Kalakaua, 16 Nov. 1836. ditto. ditto. Haaheo Kania [Kaniu].
§Victoria Kamamalu, 4 Nov. 1838. Kekuanaoa. Kinau.
Bernice Pauahi, 19 Dec. 1831. Paki. Konia. Kinau.
Abigail [Lanihau] Maheha, 10 July 1832. Namaile. Liliha. Kekauonohi.
¶Jane Loeau, 5 Dec. 1828. Kalaiulumoku [Kalaniulumoku] [Liliha.] Kaukualii.
Elizabeth Kekaniau [Kekaaniau], 11  Sept. 1834. Laanui. Oana.
Emma Rooke, 2 Jan. 1836. Naea. Kekela. T. C. B. Rooke, M. D.
Lydia Makaeha [Kamakaeha], 2 Sept. 1838. Pakea [Kapaakea]. Keohokalole. Paki & Konia.
Polly Paaaina, 1833. Henry Lewis. Kekala [Kekela]. John Ii.

*Heir apparent to the crown. (The king having no children.)
†Governor presumptive of Kauai.
‡Gov. presumpt. of maui. (Now convalescing from fever.)
‖Convalescing from fever—(25th May.)
§Heir apparent to the premiership.
¶Half-sister of Abigail.
**The premier.

Nor do Mr. & Mrs. Cooke neglect to impress upon their pupils that the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and religion the basis of all private and public worth. A portion of scripture is read morning and evening, with singing and prayer, in the presbyterian form of family worship.

On Sundays, the pupils regularly attend two services in native, by the Rev. Mr. Armstrong, and one in English, by the Rev. Mr. Damon.

Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, both by precept and the example of their own well regulated family, enforce the utmost propriety of moral deportment, and every punctilio of cleanliness, dress, manner and address, calculated to add the polish of refinement to more solid and useful attainments.

The pupils rise with the sun, breakfast at 7 A. M., dine at 1 o’clock, take tea at 6 P. M., and retire early to rest. At table, Mr. and Mrs. Cooke always preside, and there is an abundant supply of good and substantial food.¹

The school hours are from 9 to 12 A. M., and from 2 to 5 P. M.

The medical care of the pupils has devolved upon Dr. G. P. Judd, who not withstanding his onerous and multifarious duties as secretary of state for foreign affairs, head of the financial department, &c., &c., always finds time to attend, when wanted. i myself have been an eye-witness of the extreme anxiety and tenderness with which he watched the progress of the fever of little William, whose symptoms were, for several weeks, very alarming. And it is but right I should add that his good and exemplary lady was a frequent visitor at the bed-side of the sick child.

It is impossible, in any part of the world, that sick children could have been better looked after, than were William, Lot and Jane, by Dr. Judd, and Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, whether as regards the curative or nursing department.

Amongst other things pleasing to observe, was the great concern and affection of the parents, especially in the case of William, who was the only one in real danger.

The pupils are encouraged in the gymnastical exercises which tend to develop the physical powers and fortify the constitution. Among these are playing ball, flying kites, cultivation of flowers, swinging, see-sawing, walking, and riding on horseback.

To me it is a most pleasing scene to see them all, boys and girls, well attired and well mounted, merry and good humored, curvetting, galloping and turning round their horses with great dexterity. This pleasure I have, almost every evening during my rides, as I seldom fail to meet and ride on part of my way with them.

When Admiral Thomas was here, he was always glad to see them at his house, and to encourage them to go out to tea-parties at the houses of respectable foreign residents here. I have thus met the young chiefs often in society, and I have always found that they support their part in the conversation, in English, with much decorum and propriety. In fact, there is nothing perceptible in their manner or habits that could strike a stranger as differing much from the manners and habits of young English or Americans of the same age.

Each child or pupil has from two to six native attendants, namely: tailors, washers, grooms, &c., according to the age, rank and sex of each; and these are all under the direction of John Ii and his wife, both most respectable natives, who cooperate with Mr. and Mrs. Cooke in excluding these attendants from any intercourse of intimacy with the young chiefs that could communicate to them their own vices, prejudices and superstitions.

Mr. Cooke assures me that in every department of education, they show a readiness and docility quite equal to any other children, of the same ages, and under the same circumstances.

If is evident that under his and Mrs. Cooke’s tuition, these young chiefs will go forth into the world and assume their respective stations, having a fund of general knowledge vastly superior to what is sometimes found in the riders of extensive provinces, and even some republics in Spanish America. It is equally obvious that the administration of these future rulers must be immeasurably more enlightened than any that has ever before existed in these islands; and when they come into power, a new and better order of things may be expected.

This most useful institution, fraught with so many blessings present and prospective, temporal and spiritual, is supported at an expense to the government of about $2000 yearly. This is all that is allowed to Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, for their own salaries, for finding the table, domestics and all incidental expenses. To me it is incomprehensible how they can do so much, with so little.

The clothing is found by the parents or guardians of the pupils. It is supplied in abundance and good taste.

Separate rooms are provided for every two of the pupils; and the apartments are clean, well furnished and well ventilated. There are in all 17 rooms of various dimensions, opening into a court 36 feet square, with windows on the outside, which is 76 feet square. The whole building cost originally little more than $2000, though it is solidly constructed with sun-dried bricks (adobes) with a well thatched roof. But the furniture must have cost a great deal, as no comfort, in that respect, that can be imagined, is wanting.

The Rev. Mr. Dibble says that the king, when surveying the happy group, and noticing their improvement, remarked: “I wish my lot had been like yours; I deeply regret the foolish manner in which I spent the years of my youth;” and I would venture to add, that the king has more reason to be proud of this chiefs’ school than of any thing within his dominion.

(Friend, August 1, 1844, p. 36)

The following is a list...

The Friend, Volume II, Number VIII, Page 36. August 1, 1844.

¹This comment about the abundance of food reminded me of something Liliuokalani said in Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen. “…our instructors were especially particular to teach us the proper use of the English language; but when I recall the instances in which we were sent hungry to bed, it seems to me that they failed to remember that we were growing children. A thick slice of bread covered with molasses was usually the sole article of our supper, and we were sometimes ingenious, if not over honest, in our search for food: if we could beg something of the cook it was the easier way; but if not, anything eatable left within our reach was surely confiscated. As a last resort, we were not above searching the gardens for any esculent root or leaf, which (having inherited the art of igniting a fire from the friction of sticks), we could cook and consume without the knowledge of our preceptors.”

Speaking of Hawaii’s Story by Hawaii’s Queen, i was expecting the new much-awaited edition to be available already, but hopefully it will be out in bookstores soon! I am thinking of putting up related articles like this one (mostly from the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers) to perhaps give a fuller picture of topics covered in the Queen’s book.

[This is written by Robert Crichton Wyllie, and is found in a very enlightening treatise describing many aspects of life in Honolulu in the 1840s. “NOTE On the Shipping, Trade, Agriculture, Climate, Diseases, Religious Institutions, Civil and Social Conditions, Mercantile and Financial Policy of the Sandwich or Hawaiian Islands, viewed in relation to other groups of islands, and to the natural and acquired advantages of the Sandwich or Hawaiian Islands.” Friend, June 1–September 24, 1844.]

Autobiography of Joseph Kawai Opunui, 1929.

THE STORY OF JOSEPH KAWAI OPUNUI AND HIS DESCENDANTS

Joseph Kawai Opunui was born on June 16, 1853 of Hapuku Opunui (m) and Kauhailama Waiwaiole (f) at Kalapana, Puna, Hawaii; and when he grew older, he would go around Kapoho, Puna; and when he was 15, came to Honolulu. Here he entered the English school at Kawaiahao in 1868, on the 3rd day of the month of May; David Malo was the teacher there. He stopped attending that school on July 20, 1870, and entered the Royal School of Kehehuna [Kula Alii o Kahehuna] in 1871. He left that school on April 6, 1872 and went to work for C. P. Ward [Ka Pepee] at Old Plantation as a grass cutter, as a pond worker at the pond of Koula, and as a coconut tree planter of the coconut grove growing there to the present.

He took a wife on October 6, 1873, and had his first child on September 29, 1874. My wife gave birth in Honolulu.

I took care of the jitney cart [kaa kika-ne] for my boss, Mr. Ward, for wages of four dollars a week. That was a lot of money in those days. After that, I went to work for Henry May & Co., food purveyors, weighing coffee, rice, sugar, potatoes, and so forth. They pay was ten dollars per week. I stayed with that employer until they merged with J. T. Waterhouse and McIntyer under the company name of Henry May & Co. It is still in operation today.

From there, I went to work for the government on roads for $1.25 a day, for 15 years. This was under the territory, and then 12 years under the county. I am retired now, but am receiving a pension.

This past 16th of June, I made 76 years old.

We have 1 son and 3 daughters from our loins;

Philamina, Joseph, Christina and Kealohapauole.

Philamina had 17 children. She was married twice. Her first husband was Herman Kaouli, and the second was William Keiki. With him she had six children, and with H. K. Ha’o she had eleven children.

The second child of Joseph Jr. died at the age of three.

One child is living in China. Kealohapauole is childless.

Between Philamina and Herman Kaouli, 2 children are living; with H. K. Ha’o, 2 children are living.

The first child is Margaret; the second child is Victoria. Margaret married J. Kaakua, and they had two children: Mary Laniwahine (deceased) and the second child, Hiram K. Kaakua.

Victoria married Isaac K. Kaawa and they had three children: Thomas K., Margaret Kahalelaulani, and Victoria.

The one living child of William K. Keiki is Clara, and she has five children: Philamina Nohokula, Manuel Kawai, Clara Hiilani, William Weheikekapu, and Frank.

Andrade is the name of Clara’s husband, and he is the father of those children.

I have three generations. With aloha.

Joseph Kawai Opunui

1805 Kalani St., Honolulu.

[I came across this interesting autobiography the other day. Usually, this type of information is submitted by someone else when a person dies, but here, Joseph Kawai Opunui is telling his own story.]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/27/1929, p. 4)

HE MOOLELO NO JOSEPH KAWAI OPUNUI AME KANA MAU MAMO

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Iune 27, 1929.

More on the Hawaiian National Hymn, 1874.

Hawaiian National Hymn.

William Charles Lunalilo, whose death we briefly announced in our last issue, was descended from the highest of the Royal line of Hawaiian Chiefs. His mother was Kekauluohi, known as Kaahumanu III., Kuhina Nui (Premier) under Kamehameha III., and was married to Charles Kanaina, from which marriage two sons were born Davida and William. The former died when quite young. William, soon after his mother’s death, when about eight years of age, was placed in the Royal School, kept by Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, where he received a liberal English education, and as he possessed naturally, a quick mind, he became one of the best scholars in the school. For English classical literature he had great fondness, and his familiarity with the English poets was remarkable. It was this taste that led him to indulge in writing poetry, some of which was well composed. On one occasion, twelve years ago, he called on us in our editorial sanctum and sat down at our table. In the course of the conversation, we suggested that he become a competitor for the best prize which had been offered for the best Hawaiian version of “God Save the King.” He took a pen and in fifteen or twenty minutes handed us his verses, which we enclosed in an envelope and passed with ten or twelve others to the judges, who awarded it the prize, and this is known now as the Hawaiian National Hymn “God Save the King.” We instance this to illustrate the extraordinary mental qualities with which he was endowed.—Gazette, Feb. 11.

E Ola ka Moi i ke Akua.

HAKUIA E KA MEA KIEKIE WILLIAM C. LUNALILO.

1. Ke Akua mana mau,
Hoomaikai, pomaikai
I ka Moi!
Kou lima mana mau,
Malama, kiai mai
Ko makou nei Moi,
E ola e!

2. Ka inoa kamahao
Lei nani o makou,
E ola e!
Kou eheu uhi mai,
Pale na ino e,
Ka makou pule nou,
E ola e!

3. Imua ou makou,
Ke ‘Lii o na Alii,
E aloha mai;
E mau ke ea e
O ke aupuni nei,
E ola mau makou,
Me ka Moi.

God Save the King.

TRANSLATED BY REV. L. LYONS.

1. Eternal, mighty God,
Bless, from thy bright abode,
Our Sovereign King;
May thy all-powerful arm
Ward from our Sire all harm,
Let no vile foe alarm,
Long may he reign!

2. Royal, distinguished name,
Our beauteous diadem,
Long life be thine;
Thy wing spread o’er our land.
From every wrong defend,
For thee our prayers ascend,
Long live our King!

3. Before thee, King of Kings,
Of whom all nature sings,
Our prayer we bring;
Oh, let our kingdom live,
Life, peace and union give,
Let all thy care receive;
Bless thou our King!

(Friend, 3/2/1874, p. 24)

Hawaiian National Hymn.

The Friend, New Series, Volume 23, Number 3, Page 24. March 2, 1874.