Ahuimanu College Examinations, 1871.

Ahuimanu College.

Ahuimanu College is under the administration of the Roman Catholics; the students had their examinations last week Wednesday. We very much wanted to see firsthand the progress made by this school, but we did not know ahead of time, and its examination date was not advertised. And therefore, we perhaps can take word of their progress from people who were there and who weighed for themselves. This school, many years ago, was under the leadership of Rev. Walsh, and these days, it is being taught and lead by Rev. Father Lievin, the one who is known for his abilities, kindness, and some other good traits for the proper administering in the advancement of the school.

We were informed that the visitors enjoyed the spelling and clear reading of the students of the lower classes. The young students who could not speak English they ear before, could now pronounce clearly what they were reading. This was a testament to the strength and competence of their teaching and their guidance; giving hope that if they continue to progress in that fashion, they will not fail to make advancements in the future. The teaching and making clear to the students about reading clearly is very important in the knowledge of reading that is to be ingrained in our youngsters; whereas studying hurriedly will be worthless in the end; that kind of learning is nothing more than a horse race. Continue reading

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Ahuimanu College and St. Louis College, 1882.

ST. LOUIS COLLEGE

Is our leading Roman Catholic educational institution for boys. It is an old institution called by a new name and located in a new place. The same institution long existed and prosecuted its mission at Koolau, on the other side of this island, and was there and then known as Ahuimanu College. Although delightfully situated, and having many advantages in its favor, it was felt to be too far from the centre of population, to answer fully the purpose of its existence. Consequently, it was decided, a short time ago, to remove the institution to the neighborhood of Honolulu.

For this purpose the church authorities purchased a splendid piece of property from Mr. Roth, at the north end of Beretania street, not far from Smith’s bridge, where they have erected suitable buildings, and established the old Ahuimanu College under the new name of St. Louis College.

The College grounds measure about two acres, allowing abundance of space for recreative exercise, and are planted with all kinds of tropical trees, some of which are fruit-producing, while others simply afford shade and ornamentation. It is truly a lovely spot, and being free from noisy surroundings, is peculiarly adapted to the purpose for which it is now used.

The College building is a substantial two storey brick structure, 60×20 feet in the clear. The ground floor is divided into three class rooms of equal size, by wooden partitions. Each of these rooms is nicely furnished with new school furniture of the most approved modern style. They are also well lighted and ventillated, ventillation being greatly assisted by the wooden partitions not extending the whole way to the ceiling, which latter is fourteen feet from the floor. Continue reading

Short biography of the great Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe, 1912.

JOSEPH MOKUOHAI POEPOE

This candidate for the legislature in the Democratic party of Oahu nei was born at Honomakau, which is famous for the saying: “No youth of Kohala goes out unprepared” [“Aohe u’i hele wale o Kohala”]. This also is the birthplace of the Hon. H. M. Kaniho. He was born on the 27th of March, 1852. When he was small, he was brought to Honolulu. He entered into the districts schools [kula apana] here in Honolulu, and also in Kalauao, Ewa. And thereafter he attended the Royal School at Kehehuna, and its head Instructor was Mr. Beckwith. After two years there, he entered Ahuimanu College in Koolaupoko, under the instruction of the Fathers Elekenio, Remona, Livino, and the many other teachers. He was taught law in North Kohala under Judge P. Kamakaia. He returned here to Honolulu and studied law at the law school of W. R. Castle [W. R. Kakela], as well as at the law school of S. B. Dole. He studied law with lawyers Davidson and Lukela. In 1884, he received his full license to practice law in all Courts of Hawaii nei, and he still retains his law license. He was an editor for many of the Hawaiian-language newspapers in this town. Currently, he is the editor for KE ALOHA AINA. He was a teacher at the boarding school of Rev. E. Bond [Rev. E. Bona] in Kohala. He was the first to establish an English language school in North Kohala, Hawaii. He was an assistant teacher at the British Government School at Ainakea, under H. P. Wood, and thereafter under E. N. Dyer. For many years he tried to join the Legislature, so that the lahui would see him pass laws that would benefit the lahui in need; but the people did not assent. Now his hope is that it will be in the upcoming election that the voters will come through, making him a Representative, whereupon he will show his works for the good of the land and for the advancement of the lahui.

[Poepoe played a huge part in the history of the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers! I was happy to find this. Also, I just saw this morning more on the Catholic school at Ahuimanu on Nanea Armstrong-Wassel’s instagram page. Go check it out. There is a picture of the school as well!]

(Aloha Aina, 10/26/1912, p. 1)

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Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII, Helu 43, Aoao 1. Okatoba 26, 1912.