Art by Hawaiians at Sana Lui, 1888.

SAINT LOUIS SCHOOL.

We went to tour the school of Saint Louis these past days and drawing which is outside of the regular work from their books is what we were most impressed with at their skill, talent, and true excellence in that activity. These are the majority of the paintings which we  acquired. Continue reading

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Visit to Ahuimanu College and impressions of Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe, 1873.

Ahuimanu College.

During our vacation, our pleasant diversion was a visit to the other side of the island to attend the examination of the Catholic Seminary, known as Ahuimanu College. The trip to that point takes us over celebrated Pali, the pass and precipice which afford such a noble view of the lovely landscape on the northeaster side of the island. We went in state to the Pali with a four in hand, driven by mine host of our Hotel, who is as good a whip as he is a caterer. We partook of a dejeuner upon a knoll which overlooks the enchanting view; and then descended on foot the steep stairway of the mountain. The slope would not be so very difficult if the constant winds driving through this gorge of the mountain did not compel, sometimes, gentlemen to hold on to their hats, and ladies to hats and skirts, with both hands. The cavern of the winds seems situated hereabout, and Eolus and Boreas try to crack their cheeks in blowing on every passer-by. At the foot of the Pali we found friend Doiron awaiting us with a good vehicle and a stout horse, and having also the assistance of two boys on horseback, who attached their lariats to the shafts of our buggy, to help over the hills, away we went, a merry company of six in a trap made to carry four, and at noon on the third instant we arrived at the lovely retreat of Ahuimanu.

Father Lieven, the Principal, a stout hearty gentleman, of about forty years of age, gave us a welcome; which was heightened by meeting his coadjutor Father McGinniss, a genial son of the Isle of Faith. In the course of the day, the Venerable Bishop Monseigneur Maigret, accompanied by Father Aubert of Lahaina, arrived; and subsequently we had the honor to meet for the first time Father Damien, our hero who has devoted his life to the lepers. And soon, with this intelligent, cultivated and chatty company of Reverends, we found ourselves very pleasantly at home.

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Expulsion from Ahuimanu College, 1876.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Ahuimanu College—Published in our paper last week was a letter written by some of the boys of that school, pertaining to the boarding, the education, and the work at that school. This week, we report that the tree and the fruit was seen. The words in the paper were taken to each student, and they were asked, “Are the words in our newspaper true?” Those who said yes were expelled, Continue reading

Aloha Aina, 1893.

THE SCHOOLS OF SAINT LOUIS AND KAMEHAMEHA.

We reported that the students of Saint Louis School were forbidden from wearing annexation ribbons upon their chests. That is patriotism. And we also reported that the students of Kamehameha School were ordered to wear annexation ribbons at the urging of the teacher. How lamentable for the Hawaiian youths that are pushed in to giving up their land of birth.

(Hawaii Holomua, 4/13/1893, p. 2)

HawaiiHolomua_4_13_1893_2.png

Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 200, Aoao 2. Aperila 13, 1893.

Ahuimanu College and St. Louis College, 1882.

ST. LOUIS COLLEGE

Is our leading Roman Catholic educational institution for boys. It is an old institution called by a new name and located in a new place. The same institution long existed and prosecuted its mission at Koolau, on the other side of this island, and was there and then known as Ahuimanu College. Although delightfully situated, and having many advantages in its favor, it was felt to be too far from the centre of population, to answer fully the purpose of its existence. Consequently, it was decided, a short time ago, to remove the institution to the neighborhood of Honolulu.

For this purpose the church authorities purchased a splendid piece of property from Mr. Roth, at the north end of Beretania street, not far from Smith’s bridge, where they have erected suitable buildings, and established the old Ahuimanu College under the new name of St. Louis College.

The College grounds measure about two acres, allowing abundance of space for recreative exercise, and are planted with all kinds of tropical trees, some of which are fruit-producing, while others simply afford shade and ornamentation. It is truly a lovely spot, and being free from noisy surroundings, is peculiarly adapted to the purpose for which it is now used.

The College building is a substantial two storey brick structure, 60×20 feet in the clear. The ground floor is divided into three class rooms of equal size, by wooden partitions. Each of these rooms is nicely furnished with new school furniture of the most approved modern style. They are also well lighted and ventillated, ventillation being greatly assisted by the wooden partitions not extending the whole way to the ceiling, which latter is fourteen feet from the floor. Continue reading

Famous singer, John Sumner Ellis, passes on, 1914.

VOICE OF SINGER FOREVER STILLED

John Sumner Ellis, Who Made Hawaiian Melody Popular on Mainland, Called by Death.

(From Thursday Advertiser.)

Following an illness of nine months, John Sumner Ellis, known as Hawaii’s premier tenor singer, died Tuesday afternoon shortly before five o’clock at the home of Deputy County Clerk Eugene D. Buffandeau, 1205 Alexander street, his brother-in-law.

Ellis was a victim of tuberculosis, which he contracted in the East. He…

JOHN SUMNER ELLIS

…returned to Honolulu three weeks ago with the avowed intention of seeing his beloved island home before he passed away. His wish was gratified to the extent that he died in his native land, surrounded by the friends of his boyhood.

The funeral will take place at ten o’clock this morning from the undertaking parlors of H. H. Williams, Fort street. Ellis’ remains will be buried in the family plot in Nuuanu cemetery.

Ellis was born in Honolulu on April 11, 1877, and would have been thirty-seven years of age on April 11 of this year had he lived. He was the son of the late Charles K. Ellis, who was at one time connected with the old Honolulu Iron Works, and Nancy Sumner Ellis, and a grand nephew of John Sumner, Honolulu’s well known pioneer.

Mourning his loss and surviving him are his wife, who was Mrs. May Barnard, and who married him in Chicago in 1909; his six-year old stepdaughter; William Sumner Ellis, a brother, and also a well known singer who resided now in New York, and Mrs. Victoria Buffandeau, of Honolulu, a sister. He also leaves a fourteen-year-old son who resides in San Francisco with his mother, Ellis’ divorced wife. Willie Davis, of Honolulu, is a cousin of the deceased.

John Sumner Ellis was educated in St. Louis College of this city, where he early made a mark as a singer. He was a member of the college band and after leaving school joined the Royal Hawaiian Band under Capt. Henri Berger. Ellis will be remembered as one of the foremost players with the Maile football eleven in the nineties.

Ellis was a member of Ernest Kaai’s well known musical organization when it first started out. He left the Islands on May 30, 1905, almost nine years ago, with “Sonny” Cunha’s Hawaiian quintet for a tour of the mainland. When this organization returned to Honolulu Ellis remained on the mainland, singing in vaudeville in the East. He was employed for a long time by the Hawaii Promotion Committee. He sang in grand opera shortly before being attacked with the disease which finally put an untimely end to his promising career.

He was possessed of an unusually sweet tenor voice wherever on the mainland he sang Hawaii’s plaintive airs he immediately became a favorite. Ellis was instrumental, probably more so than any other Hawaiian singer, in popularizing Hawaiian melodies on the mainland and especially in the east. He was attractive in appearance, well mannered and readily made lasting friends. With his passing away Hawaii has lost a son who was a credit to her, both at home and abroad.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 2/27/1914, p. 5)

VOICE OF SINGER FOREVER STILLED

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume VII, Number 17, Page 5. February 27, 1914.