Visit to Ahuimanu College and impressions of Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe, 1873.

Ahuimanu College.

During our vacation, our pleasant diversion was a visit to the other side of the island to attend the examination of the Catholic Seminary, known as Ahuimanu College. The trip to that point takes us over celebrated Pali, the pass and precipice which afford such a noble view of the lovely landscape on the northeaster side of the island. We went in state to the Pali with a four in hand, driven by mine host of our Hotel, who is as good a whip as he is a caterer. We partook of a dejeuner upon a knoll which overlooks the enchanting view; and then descended on foot the steep stairway of the mountain. The slope would not be so very difficult if the constant winds driving through this gorge of the mountain did not compel, sometimes, gentlemen to hold on to their hats, and ladies to hats and skirts, with both hands. The cavern of the winds seems situated hereabout, and Eolus and Boreas try to crack their cheeks in blowing on every passer-by. At the foot of the Pali we found friend Doiron awaiting us with a good vehicle and a stout horse, and having also the assistance of two boys on horseback, who attached their lariats to the shafts of our buggy, to help over the hills, away we went, a merry company of six in a trap made to carry four, and at noon on the third instant we arrived at the lovely retreat of Ahuimanu.

Father Lieven, the Principal, a stout hearty gentleman, of about forty years of age, gave us a welcome; which was heightened by meeting his coadjutor Father McGinniss, a genial son of the Isle of Faith. In the course of the day, the Venerable Bishop Monseigneur Maigret, accompanied by Father Aubert of Lahaina, arrived; and subsequently we had the honor to meet for the first time Father Damien, our hero who has devoted his life to the lepers. And soon, with this intelligent, cultivated and chatty company of Reverends, we found ourselves very pleasantly at home.

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The latest from Kohala, 1879.

News of the Apaapaa Winds.

To My Constant Desire, Ka Nupepa Kuokoa.

Aloha oe:—On this past 11th of Oct., fire engulfed more or less 15 acres of Robert R. Hind’s.

This is the cause. The fire jumped from the property of J. W. Keohokii, Esq., while he and his workers were burning the leaves of the sugarcane.

And it was extinguished because of all of those assisting. The luckiest thing was that the cane was all ready to be milled.

While the smoke was billowing, the Fly Wheels of the two Mills spun, that being Haui Mill [Hawi Mill] and Union Mill,  hoping to quickly take care of that burning cane. Because of the terribly wild winds that day, it was not put out quickly.

On that very day of the fire, a Handwritten Newspaper at Kaiopihi under the editing of Joseph Poepoe was issued.

The name of that paper is “Hoku o ke Kai.” When we examined it, the discussions were outstanding.

On the past 16th of this month, at 6 o’clock in the evening, the sugar plantation people of the district of Kohala, from Niulii to Kaauhuhu, met at the Court House. And this is what happened at that meeting.

The officers were chosen first. J. Wight, President; Dr. Thompson, Vice President; H. B. Montgomery, Secretary; D. S. Kahookano, Hawaiian Secretary; Charles Hapkins [Charles Hopkins], Translator.

After this, Henry Johnson explained the purpose of this meeting.

1. Pertaining to the laborers. 2. Pertaining to the wages of the laborers. 3. The work hours per day. This was left to a committee.

D. R. Vida, Esq., asked that a Committee be selected to  form a constitution, laws, and rules; the motion was passed.

H. Johnson, Esq. put forth the name of this organization, that being “Hui imi pono a hooholomua o ka poe mahiko a Wili o Kohala” [Association seeking rights and progress for the workers of the plantations and Mills of Kohala].

The meeting was adjourned until the 30th of Oct. to hear the report of the Committee.

Yesterday afternoon, Oct. 17, a brick fell between the Boilers of the Mill of R. R. Hind, Esq., but there were no serious injuries.

Those were a few news items from here in the Back areas.

Charlse N. Pulaa.

Honomakua, Kohala, Oct. 18, 1879.

(Kuokoa, 10/25/1879, p. 3)

Na Anoai o Ke Apaapaa.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVIII, Helu 43, Aoao 3. Okatoba 25, 1879.