John Harvey Coney visits Honolulu, 1869.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

The Sheriff of the island of Keawe [Hawaii] was here in Honolulu, that being Mr. J. H. Coney [J. H. Koni] Esq., of Hilo, Continue reading

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Good roads down in Ewa, 1869.

The road of Ewa—There are perhaps no other people in the backside of town who are greatly blessed with good roads to travel upon like those who live in the Ewa side and all the way leeward. Leaving town, it is truly a pleasant ride by horse or carriage; the windiness of Moanalua, the descent of Kapukaki, Kalauao, and the rise on that side, and the descent of Waimalu; it is just fine; there are no obstructing boulders that block or hold up the trip. There is great confidence in the efficiency of our Road Supervisor [Luna Alanui], and we hope that the days will not be far away when the roads all over the island will progress as well.

[This is the first time I have come across “maikakaʻi,” which I am guessing is a reduplication of maikaʻi. Any other thoughts?]

(Au Okoa, 1/21/1869, p. 2)

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Ke Au Okoa, Buke IV, Helu 40, Aoao 2. Ianuari 21, 1869.

Maternal instinct, 1918.

LIFE SAVED

When the people of the County and the Tax Office employees of this island were playing this past Monday, a Portuguese mother put down her baby on top of a park bench, and turned to watch the people playing. While she was enjoying her spectating, one of the players hit a ball and the ball flew directly for where the baby was lying face up, and when this mother saw the trouble the baby was in, she shielded her baby from above and the ball indeed hit the mother’s back, saving the life of the baby. Continue reading

Early story from Joseph Nawahi, 1861.

An amazing thief!

In a certain town there lived three blind men, and they were seen often by the people of the place. What they did was walk the streets asking for money, food, and other things they needed for their livelihood there. Doing so, they received a lot of money from help given them by the wealthy and due to the aloha from others. They took the money they made everyday and put it in a strong box, and when they left the money, they left the bags as well. One day, they went and came back with bags full of money; the amazing thief saw all that money of the blind men, that there was so much, and he followed them thinking that he would steal it, because he thought they were blind and would not see him steal it, so he approached the blind men when they were entering their house, and when they got to the door, one of the blind men unlocked the door and it opened, and they went in without seeing him, and they immediately locked the door. The blind men opened the money box to count, for they always counted what they had made previously and what they made anew. Continue reading

Streets of Honolulu, 1856.

Some Names of Government Streets here in Honolulu.—The Privy Council of the King pronounced:

The street between Beretania Street and Ii Street is Emma Street; the street between the Polynesian printing house and the Sailors’ House is Paki Street; the street between Nuuanu Street and Liliha Street upland of Waikahalulu Falls is Wailele Street; Continue reading