News of “ka aina mauna,” 1883.

NEWS OF WAIMEA.

H. Baldwin was recently here with some other haole searching for the source of the water of Ulu, flowing in Waipio, and it was found through the patient search of that haole, and some Hawaiians along with the writer were along on that trip to find water, in the jungles of the mountain; this is thought to be water to make an auwai from Ulu to Hamakua, and it will be started perhaps soon. Continue reading

More on Kahuku connection to Waipahu, 1939.

ADDING TO MRS. LAHILAHI WEBB’S STORY OF WAIPAHU

Editor The Advertiser:

May I add a little to Lahilahi Webb’s story of Waipahu.

On Tuesday Miss Titcomb took Lahilahi Webb and me to interview Mrs. Kapeka Baker, one of the two remaining old timers of that locality. Continue reading

Lahilahi Webb on Kahuku connection to Waipahu, 1939.

LAHILAHI WEBB’S STORY OF THE LOST KAPA MALLET

Editor The Advertiser:

In the Advertiser this morning, May 16, I saw the article “Underground Channel May connect Kahuku and Waipahu.” I have heard about this water of Waipahu coming from Kahuku, frommy childhood. My mother’s people were kamaainas of Waikele and the Ewa district. Also my granduncle, Kapepu Kauila, familiarly known as Kapepu, the Konohiki nui of Waikele and Waianae. Continue reading

Kahuku connected to Waipahu by underground channel, 1939.

Underground Channel May Connect Kahuku, Waipahu

By ORINE HAMMOND

Are there underground channels from one side of the Island to the other?

Is there, Kamaainas of Waipahu, a stream which begins as Punahoolapa—the “Bright Spring”—in Kahuku, disappears and worms its way underground across the Island to reappear in your own Waipahu spring? Continue reading

Lake Waiau atop Mauna Kea is frozen, 1906.

THE FIRST TIME LAKE WAIAU IS SKATED UPON.

When Mr. Eben Low of Waimea, Hawaii, arrived in town, some news about Mauna Kea was heard. According to him, because the ice on the top of Lake Waiau [ka moanawai o Waiau] is frozen solid, it can be walked upon.

The freshwater lake Waiau is a lake atop Mauna Kea, about 15,000 feet above sea level, which is covered with ice, which visitors walked upon. The thickness of the ice was tested by digging, but after digging for two feet, the travellers gave up continuing to dig. Continue reading

Looking back at their time spent at Lahainaluna, 1904.

TEARS SHED FOR THE DAYS GONE BY.

Being that some of the old students educated at Lahainaluna College are involved in this water rights case, Mr. McDonald, the principal of Lahainaluna, gave a small party for the old students of the school.

Amongst those who attended were the Hon. J. L. Kaulukou, T. He-u, students who graduated in 1854; D. Kailua, a student who gradutated in 1858; Hon. D. Damiana, a student who graduated in 1857; Mrs. E. M. Nakuina, from the side of the Government; and some other people.

After the stomachs were filled, the graduates were called up to talk about their life at the school, and as a result of the words of these people, much tears were shed because of the great troubles faced in search of education in those days gone by.

According to one of the graduates, his clothes in those days of hardship was just two pants, two palaka, a hat, and no shoes. Another said that he had just one shirt and no other, none at all. Being that there was much food planted on the school property by the students, fish was the relish, the oopu that were caught in the rivers, and the luau.

Currently, the principal is thinking about going back to the work done in the schools in days past, those of Lahainaluna have placed their hope upon him, that he will have this famous saying go on.—”Ka ipukukui pio ole i ka Makani Kauaula.”¹

¹The famous epithet for Lahainaluna School: “The light not extinguished by the Kauaula winds.”

(Kuokoa, 5/13/1904, p. 5)

KULU NA WAIMAKA NO NA LA I HALA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 20, Aoao 5. Mei 13, 1904.

Offense, Judgement, and Remorse, 1862.

The Tale of the Elepaio and the Water Gourd.

One day, a man named Piiwai went up the mountains to fetch drinking water, for the water of that area was located in the mountains, that being at Kahului, Kona, Hawaii. From one side to the other of that area in Kona, there was water by the ocean, but brackish water, and was not pleasant to drink, and the cool and very refreshing water to drink was in the uplands in the mountains; it is still this way these days, that they go into the mountains to fetch water.

When he made his ascent until this spring, he scooped in his water gourd [huewai] until it was filled with water, and he made his way back until a hill where he rested. He put down his huewai and stood it upright and went elsewhere.

At that time, a bird flew down, an Elepaio, and alighted on the spout of the huewai of that man, and the bird pecked at the huewai of the man until all the water flowed out; the man returned to where the huewai stood and the bird flew away and perched.

But the man saw the bird fly away, yet he did not imagine that his huewai was pecked on by the bird. He grabbed it and lifted it up, and it felt lighter; the man looked at it and saw that there was a hole; he figured that the bird pecked at it until making a hole; his anger at the bird boiled over and said to himself, “Ha! You are one very mischievous bird; I will kill you.”

The man grabbed a rock, and threw it at the bird, hitting it, but it did not die. The bird flew away; it flew away so that its many fellow birds could judge this stoning by the man.

When it flew away in search of the birds, after flying for a while, he first spotted Pueo, the owl; he flew by Pueo and called out like this:

“O Pueo, O Pueo,”

Pueo heard this call from Elepaio; Pueo turned and poised aloft and gently, Pueo inquired like this:

“O Elepaio, O Elepaio, What is it that you want of me?”

Elepaio told of what he did to the huewai of the man in a chanting song [olioli], like this:

“I was hit, By the rock, Of a man.”

Pueo asked Elepaio,

“Who was at fault.” Elepaio responded in chant:

“I was at fault, For pecking,
The huewai, Of the man.”

Pueo said in chant:

“Let it be judged, By the many birds, Among us.”

Elepaio went in search; he flew for a while and saw Io, the hawk, soaring atop the gentle winds, and Elepaio called out:

“O Io, O Io,”

Io turned toward him and asked, “What do you want of me?”

Elepaio answered:

“I was hit, By the Rock. Of a man.”

Io questioned, “Who was at fault?” Elepaio responded:

“I was at fault, For pecking,
The huewai of the man.”

Io said, just as did Pueo,

“Let it be judged, By the many birds, Among us.”

Elepaio took off flying and spotted Amakihi, and Elepaio called out:

“O Amakihi, O Amakihi.”

Amakihi turned and asked, “What is it that you want of me?” Elepaio said,

“I was hit, By the rock, Of a man.”

Amakihi questioned in a chanting song, “Who was at fault?” Elepaio answered:

“I was at fault, For pecking,
At the huewai, Of the man.”

At which point, the head of the Amakihi shook, and he raised his head and looked at Elepaio and said in a chant:

“O Elepaio, O Elepaio, You are indeed at fault,
For pecking at, The huewai, Of the man.
And if you die, It is just, For you are a trouble maker.”

When Elepaio heard these feelings of Amakihi, he grew angry, and he chanted this to Amakihi:

“There it stands, That Amakihi, [Kau pono ka ia, Kela Amakihi,]
Sour tail feathers, Horribly rank, [Pupua awaawa, He hohono pakui,]
If you were to broil it, The sauce would smell, [Ke pulehu aku, He hauna e ke kai,]
There is no meat to begin with.” [Io ole e ka mole,]

Elepaio was through talking with Amakihi and flew away; when he flew away Elepaio was very sad that Amakihi saw his guilt, so he flew away with a heavy heart.

But he was not through with his search for the many birds like he decided. He flew on and Elepaio spotted Iiwimakapolena, the yellow-eyed iiwi, and he called out to it as with the other birds previously.

Iiwi responded just as did Amakihi, that he was at fault. This was the end of his being judged by the many birds, and Elepaio was saddened, and he was truly remorseful in his guilt.  S. W. K.

Kamakela, Honolulu, May 12, 1862.

[It is interesting to compare this 1862 telling with the one put out by Kamehameha Schools Press in 2008 and these bilingual animated videos on Oiwi TV.]

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 5/15/1862, p. 1)

He Kaao no ka Manu Elepaio.

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika, Buke I, Helu 34, Aoao 1. Mei 15, 1862.