Fear of famine in Kona, 1869.

[Found under: “NU  HOU KULOKO: Hawaii.”]

Pertaining to Kona.—From the many passengers who came aboard the schooners “Prince” and “Kona Packet,” we hear that the sun shines strongly upon that land. Continue reading

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More on Kahuku connection to Waipahu, 1939.

ADDING TO MRS. LAHILAHI WEBB’S STORY OF WAIPAHU

Editor The Advertiser:

May I add a little to Lahilahi Webb’s story of Waipahu.

On Tuesday Miss Titcomb took Lahilahi Webb and me to interview Mrs. Kapeka Baker, one of the two remaining old timers of that locality. Continue reading

Lahilahi Webb on Kahuku connection to Waipahu, 1939.

LAHILAHI WEBB’S STORY OF THE LOST KAPA MALLET

Editor The Advertiser:

In the Advertiser this morning, May 16, I saw the article “Underground Channel May connect Kahuku and Waipahu.” I have heard about this water of Waipahu coming from Kahuku, frommy childhood. My mother’s people were kamaainas of Waikele and the Ewa district. Also my granduncle, Kapepu Kauila, familiarly known as Kapepu, the Konohiki nui of Waikele and Waianae. Continue reading

Kahuku connected to Waipahu by underground channel, 1939.

Underground Channel May Connect Kahuku, Waipahu

By ORINE HAMMOND

Are there underground channels from one side of the Island to the other?

Is there, Kamaainas of Waipahu, a stream which begins as Punahoolapa—the “Bright Spring”—in Kahuku, disappears and worms its way underground across the Island to reappear in your own Waipahu spring? Continue reading

Lake Waiau atop Mauna Kea is frozen, 1906.

THE FIRST TIME LAKE WAIAU IS SKATED UPON.

When Mr. Eben Low of Waimea, Hawaii, arrived in town, some news about Mauna Kea was heard. According to him, because the ice on the top of Lake Waiau [ka moanawai o Waiau] is frozen solid, it can be walked upon.

The freshwater lake Waiau is a lake atop Mauna Kea, about 15,000 feet above sea level, which is covered with ice, which visitors walked upon. The thickness of the ice was tested by digging, but after digging for two feet, the travellers gave up continuing to dig. Continue reading

Looking back at their time spent at Lahainaluna, 1904.

TEARS SHED FOR THE DAYS GONE BY.

Being that some of the old students educated at Lahainaluna College are involved in this water rights case, Mr. McDonald, the principal of Lahainaluna, gave a small party for the old students of the school.

Amongst those who attended were the Hon. J. L. Kaulukou, T. He-u, students who graduated in 1854; D. Kailua, a student who gradutated in 1858; Hon. D. Damiana, a student who graduated in 1857; Mrs. E. M. Nakuina, from the side of the Government; and some other people.

After the stomachs were filled, the graduates were called up to talk about their life at the school, and as a result of the words of these people, much tears were shed because of the great troubles faced in search of education in those days gone by.

According to one of the graduates, his clothes in those days of hardship was just two pants, two palaka, a hat, and no shoes. Another said that he had just one shirt and no other, none at all. Being that there was much food planted on the school property by the students, fish was the relish, the oopu that were caught in the rivers, and the luau.

Currently, the principal is thinking about going back to the work done in the schools in days past, those of Lahainaluna have placed their hope upon him, that he will have this famous saying go on.—”Ka ipukukui pio ole i ka Makani Kauaula.”¹

¹The famous epithet for Lahainaluna School: “The light not extinguished by the Kauaula winds.”

(Kuokoa, 5/13/1904, p. 5)

KULU NA WAIMAKA NO NA LA I HALA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 20, Aoao 5. Mei 13, 1904.