Offense, Judgement, and Remorse, 1862.

The Tale of the Elepaio and the Water Gourd.

One day, a man named Piiwai went up the mountains to fetch drinking water, for the water of that area was located in the mountains, that being at Kahului, Kona, Hawaii. From one side to the other of that area in Kona, there was water by the ocean, but brackish water, and was not pleasant to drink, and the cool and very refreshing water to drink was in the uplands in the mountains; it is still this way these days, that they go into the mountains to fetch water.

When he made his ascent until this spring, he scooped in his water gourd [huewai] until it was filled with water, and he made his way back until a hill where he rested. He put down his huewai and stood it upright and went elsewhere.

At that time, a bird flew down, an Elepaio, and alighted on the spout of the huewai of that man, and the bird pecked at the huewai of the man until all the water flowed out; the man returned to where the huewai stood and the bird flew away and perched.

But the man saw the bird fly away, yet he did not imagine that his huewai was pecked on by the bird. He grabbed it and lifted it up, and it felt lighter; the man looked at it and saw that there was a hole; he figured that the bird pecked at it until making a hole; his anger at the bird boiled over and said to himself, “Ha! You are one very mischievous bird; I will kill you.”

The man grabbed a rock, and threw it at the bird, hitting it, but it did not die. The bird flew away; it flew away so that its many fellow birds could judge this stoning by the man.

When it flew away in search of the birds, after flying for a while, he first spotted Pueo, the owl; he flew by Pueo and called out like this:

“O Pueo, O Pueo,”

Pueo heard this call from Elepaio; Pueo turned and poised aloft and gently, Pueo inquired like this:

“O Elepaio, O Elepaio, What is it that you want of me?”

Elepaio told of what he did to the huewai of the man in a chanting song [olioli], like this:

“I was hit, By the rock, Of a man.”

Pueo asked Elepaio,

“Who was at fault.” Elepaio responded in chant:

“I was at fault, For pecking,
The huewai, Of the man.”

Pueo said in chant:

“Let it be judged, By the many birds, Among us.”

Elepaio went in search; he flew for a while and saw Io, the hawk, soaring atop the gentle winds, and Elepaio called out:

“O Io, O Io,”

Io turned toward him and asked, “What do you want of me?”

Elepaio answered:

“I was hit, By the Rock. Of a man.”

Io questioned, “Who was at fault?” Elepaio responded:

“I was at fault, For pecking,
The huewai of the man.”

Io said, just as did Pueo,

“Let it be judged, By the many birds, Among us.”

Elepaio took off flying and spotted Amakihi, and Elepaio called out:

“O Amakihi, O Amakihi.”

Amakihi turned and asked, “What is it that you want of me?” Elepaio said,

“I was hit, By the rock, Of a man.”

Amakihi questioned in a chanting song, “Who was at fault?” Elepaio answered:

“I was at fault, For pecking,
At the huewai, Of the man.”

At which point, the head of the Amakihi shook, and he raised his head and looked at Elepaio and said in a chant:

“O Elepaio, O Elepaio, You are indeed at fault,
For pecking at, The huewai, Of the man.
And if you die, It is just, For you are a trouble maker.”

When Elepaio heard these feelings of Amakihi, he grew angry, and he chanted this to Amakihi:

“There it stands, That Amakihi, [Kau pono ka ia, Kela Amakihi,]
Sour tail feathers, Horribly rank, [Pupua awaawa, He hohono pakui,]
If you were to broil it, The sauce would smell, [Ke pulehu aku, He hauna e ke kai,]
There is no meat to begin with.” [Io ole e ka mole,]

Elepaio was through talking with Amakihi and flew away; when he flew away Elepaio was very sad that Amakihi saw his guilt, so he flew away with a heavy heart.

But he was not through with his search for the many birds like he decided. He flew on and Elepaio spotted Iiwimakapolena, the yellow-eyed iiwi, and he called out to it as with the other birds previously.

Iiwi responded just as did Amakihi, that he was at fault. This was the end of his being judged by the many birds, and Elepaio was saddened, and he was truly remorseful in his guilt.  S. W. K.

Kamakela, Honolulu, May 12, 1862.

[It is interesting to compare this 1862 telling with the one put out by Kamehameha Schools Press in 2008 and these bilingual animated videos on Oiwi TV.]

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 5/15/1862, p. 1)

He Kaao no ka Manu Elepaio.

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika, Buke I, Helu 34, Aoao 1. Mei 15, 1862.

Tragic and frightening Pele in action, 1868.

Latest News!

LAVA ERUPTED SEASIDE of KAHIOIPAKINI!

77 PEOPLE PERISHED TERRIFYINGLY!

THERE WAS MUCH LOSS IN PROPERTY!

SOME 1000s OF ANIMALS DIE!

3000 OR MORE TREMORS SHAKE KAU!

THE LATEST WORD FROM KAU!

Through the kindness of our loving friend, the Honorable W. T. Martin of Kau, the one who came from where the Fiery lava is wreaking havoc, we have obtained the information below, and we put before our readers the things he witnessed with his eyes, and heard with his ears:

According to the native son of Naihe of Kau, a river of lava is flowing from Maunaloa until the sea at Kahioipakini [Ka Hioipakini], and so the people of Kona cannot set foot in Kau and so too for Kau’s people to Kona.

Five craters of lava opened up at Puuolokuana, right in the middle of the land between the sea and the Mountain.

The height that the fire is shooting up from those craters of lava is five hundred feet or more. From the plumes headed upland and down; and from the rivers of lava from Puuolokuana to the shore and entering the sea; flashes were seen like lightning in the dark, reddish-gray, green, and white clouds. Also heard booming louder than cannon.

When the lava exited to the sea, a large heap of sand appeared in the water, creeping along, being pushed forward to the side going to Kona. The lava is creating new hills, and perhaps there will be many hereafter.

A frightening rumbling was heard beneath Waiohinu and the neighboring areas when the lava was flowing. This rumbling was still going on at the time the Kona Packet [Kona Pakeke] recently left Kau.

Before the lava appeared in Puuolokuana on the evening of the 7th of April, volcanic ash had already covered the houses from Kahuku all the way to Ninole, on the night of the 6th. The kamaaina and the haole were alarmed then, thinking that this was the end, because of the explanation of a knowledgeable haole.

The great stone church standing in Waiohinu was driven to the ground, and there was not one stone left upon another; so too of all the stone buildings around that area. The wooden structures were all smashed and were pushed to the Kona side from where they first stood. From Puaao until the sea of Waikapuna, the land was cracked open on the 2nd of April, by a powerful earthquake that was seen by all of us around the area, and the quake did not subside to the moment when the ship left. A few days prior to the eruption, the fissure closed up, but where it came together did not match up as before; it is uneven.

The settlements at Kaalualu, Paiahaa, Honuapo, Hokukano, Kaalaiki, the two Hilea, Ninole, Wailau, Punaluu, all the way to the sea of Keauhou: all of those houses were lost to the sea, “by the onslaught of the great seas of the woman of the pit.”

The kind of sea that struck the settlements above, it was ocean water joined with water coming up from the ground. The height that the ocean reached was like the height of the coconut trees near the homes. These waters were not like the ocean seen on our other islands; it was terribly unusual. If it was a tsunami [kai hooee], then there would be no human toll, but what came ashore was a swirling sea [kai owili].

There is volcanic ash in the wind, which was seen at Keaiwa during the time spoken of above (Apr. 2). The area covered by ash is nearly three-forth mile in length. And under the area covered over by ash is a river of water. As the wind stretches out, the sea cliffs of Kamehame and Mahuka were swept. Soon after, is when the water appeared, devastating those spoken of in the settlements above.

It is estimated that the number of cows covered over by the eruption [luai pele] at Kapaliuka was no less than five hundred, and the goats were no less than two thousand.

The number of animals killed by the lava in Kahuku and the two Pakini, all the way to Kamaoa, is thought to be no less than one thousand cows and horses. As for the goats and sheep, their number is unknown.

The lands which turned into pahoehoe, partially engulfed by lava, was the lands of Robert Brown [Rabati Baraunu], W. T. Martin, Kamamalu, W. C. Lunalilo, government land, and lands of other kamaaina people, lying outstretched from Kahuku to Puueo. These were all fertile lands.

It is guessed that the damages of all lands destroyed by lava included with property, is no less than seventy-thousand dollars ($70,000) should it be properly  tallied. The earthquake began in Kau from the last days of March until the 10th of April; it is believed that there were three thousand quakes that shook. Some were powerful while others were weak, but there was one that was the biggest, that being the quake of the 2nd of April, from which the many below perished.

We put forward the list of those who died as spoken of above.

Perished in the Eruption at Kapaliuka, Kau, Hawaii.

Kanakaole (m.), Kailo (m.), Puoina (m.), Kalamahiai (m.), Kahuhu (m.), Kuaehu (m.), Kaawa (m.), Kuaki (m.), Pupule (m.), Kaili (m.), Kaaihue (m.), Kuikahi (m.), Kahuhu (m.), Kamaliiwahine (f.), Kalakala (f.), Mireta (f.), Mere (f.), Kekahuna (f.), Kauinui (f.), Haolelo (f.), Kumaiea (f.), Aulani (f.), Kaaiwaiwai (f.), Kahikina (f.), Kikalaole (f.), Keliinohola (f.), Honuakaha (f.), Keahiwela (f.), Waimaka (f.), Luukia (f.), Kamaka (f.).

Died at sea at Makaka & Moaula.

Kliinui [Keliinui] (m.), Awihi (m.), Ahia (m.), Kamalii (m.), Kahamo (m.), Nakamaa (m.), Kalua (m.), Keliimakawela (m.), Halelaau (f.), Kahaipo (f.), Kapuni (f.), Kapela (f.).

From Punaluu was Kalawaialiiliii (f.)

From Ninole was Kapuuhonua (m.), Hanoa (m.), Kamoka (f.).

From Kawa was Nailieha (m.), Keahialoa (m.).

From Honuapo was Keaweaheulu (m.), Haole (f.), Moeawa (m.), Moehuliole (f.), Kaumuahana (f.), Piimoku (f.), Kukona (m.), Kaina (m.), Kaumu (f.), Kiniakua (f.), Kalaiku (m.), Palapala (f.), Kailipeleuli (f.), Kauha (f.), Puhiea (m.), Moku (m.), Mahoe (m.), Keliikipi (f.), Naholoaa (f.), Kamaliikane (m.), Pupuka (f.), Apua (m.).

Died at sea at Kaalualu & Paiahaa.

Kapela (f.), Kahinakea (f.).

Surrounded by the Eruption of Kahuku.

Pau (m.), Mauae (m.), Hueu (m.), Pauwahine (m.).

People who barely survived the tsunami from Punaluu to Paiahaa in Kau, Hawaii, numbered twenty three (23), other than those who died met with disaster in Keauhou, who are not counted here. Here are those that are living atop the hills:—Puu o Haao, Kahilipaliuka, about 400 or so; in the lands of Hilea & Kaala, 80 or more; and the majority fled to Hilo & Kona. The people of Waiohinu and the devastated areas, are gathered on the hill of Haao; it is there that they sleep, but perhaps a fraction has returned back to their own place. They will probably be facing difficulty from lack of food. The farms from Pakini until the sea of Kamaoa are covered over.

(Kuokoa, 4/18/1868, p. 2)

Nu Hou Hope Loa!

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 16, Aoao 2. Aperila 18, 1868.

Emma Nakuina was pretty amazing, 1894.

E. M. NAKUINA

COMMISSIONER OF PRIVATE WAYS AND WATER RIGHTS [KOMISINA O NA ALA LIILII A ME NA PONO WAI].

Public Notary, and Agent to give out Marriage Licenses for Honolulu nei.

BUSINESS OFFICE: Number 386, Merchant Street

(Makaainana, 12/4/1894. p. 3)

E. M. NAKUINA

Ka Makaainana, Buke II—-Ano Hou, Helu 26, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 4, 1894.

Wahiawa Reservoir, 1912.

[Found under: “Bits of News”]

There were a lot of fish in the reservoir of Wahiawa when it recently went dry; from Oopu, to Shrimp [Opae], Red Fish [I’a Ulaula], and Chinese fish [i’a Pake]. They were all taken by the Japanese and those of the area. How sweet tasting. So delicious!

[I might not suggest doing this today…]

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 9/5/1912, p. 4)

Nunui ka i'a o ka luawai o Wahiawa...

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke X, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 5, 1912.

Hidden cave, 1897.

HIDDEN CAVE AT KULAOKAIWIULA, OAHU.

While Mr. Koha was digging the foundation of his house at Kulaokaiwiula [Kekulaokaiwiula], he excavated some rocks, and as he noticed a flat rock he put exerted himself in pulling it up; as he shoved down his crowbar, it slipped in and wind came blowing up from the earth. Discovering this new thing, he fetched some people to come and see it. They pried up the rock. After they saw this, Mr. Koha supposed that it possibly was a hidden cave [luahuna], although the bottom couldn’t be clearly seen because it was dark. After this great discovery, Mr. Koha put out an announcement, so that it would be clear whether it was a hidden cave or not. There was someone who was associated with this hidden cave on Hawaii, the grandchild of the caretaker of the luahuna previously. When he saw Koha’s ad about this thing, he came at once to check if what was advertised was true.  He arrived on Oahu and stayed with Koha at Kulaokaiwiula, and that was when that man from Hawaii told him about what was in that cave. Being that there was no water at this place, Kulaokaiwiula, when Koha was living there, you had to go far to fetch water; however, according to what the man from Hawaii said, there was a spring in the cave, and so that problem was solved, although you had to go down with a light [kuikui] to get the water.

Once, Koha and the man from Hawaii tried to go down in the cave. When the went, the man pointed out the different paths of the cave. This is what he described: On path went and exited at Kalalau, Kauai; and another path went and exited at Kahana, Koolauloa. The path heading to Kahana was not to be travelled by man, for it was guarded by a moo. Another time, they started taking the path which headed towards Kauai. When Koha saw this path, he was astounded to see human bones laid out, being “these were bones of ancient chiefs,” according to the kamaaina. Also here were implements, like a konane board, kilu, hula sticks [laau kaka hula], and other valuable items. The alii of old were fond of entertainment. As they continued on, he noticed there was something dripping down, so he urged his companion to turn back, and so they returned and did not go all the way.

There are more things dealing with the hidden cave, but this is what I know.  S. K.

{O Friend, we are appreciative for this very valuable description. Who else? When did this digging by Mr. Koha happen? Editor}

[The Mr. Koha being spoken of here is very likely G. M. Koha, who is a frequent writer into the newspapers. Hopefully the announcement mentioned in this article can be found sometime soon!]

(Kuokoa, 3/26/1897, p. 2)

LUAHUNA MA KE KULAOKAIWIULA, OAHU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXVI, Helu 13, Aoao 2. Maraki 26, 1897.

Pond atop Punchbowl? 1902.

Mysterious Pond.

An amazing pond was found atop Puowaina by  some people who visited there; they found this amazing waters among lantana plants. Close to this pond was planted a patch of sweet potatoes by an old Hawaiian man; he did not know of this new thing until he was weeding near the pond. While he was working [hono ana ?], to his surprise, he saw this pond their. When he looked at it, its mouth was five feet long, and so too of the depth. The water is five feet or more then you reach black sand. According to what some people say, this is magical waters. It is said to be kupua water, like what is common among amazing things, but there is no trace of the story of this water. It is truly a mysterious spring. The water in the pond these days has somewhat receded.

(Kuokoa, 6/27/1902, p. 5)

Luawai Hoopahaohao.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XL, Helu 26, Aoao 5, Iune 27, 1902.

The above image was taken directly from the microfilm. Here for comparison is the same article as it appears online:

Luawai Hoopahaohao.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XL, Helu 26, Aoao 5. Iune 27, 1902.

Bathing Pool of Kamehameha V on Molokai filled in? 1922.

Honolulu, Apr. 4. George P. Cooke reported that a Hawaiian of Molokai recalls [???] the large bathing pool of King Kamehameha V, while the king was living in Kaunakahakai, and this pool is filled with dirt now; and that Hawaiian recalls some springs near that pool of Kamehameha V. There are reservoirs being dug in the area near where that man spoke of, and [???]; the water from these places is well suited for the growing crops. There is a water pump pumping [??] thousand gallons of water every 24 hours. This is a great help [?] to Molokai.

[More potentially @-filled information …]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 4/6/1922, p. 3)

Honolulu, Apr. 4...

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XV, Helu 45, Aoao 3, Aperila 6, 1922.

Crown Lands and Government Lands, 1896.

GOVERNMENT LANDS.

Under the Republic of Hawaii that stands now, the crown lands have been returned and added with the other lands of the government, and are referred to as government lands. Currently, the entirety of these lands are under the authority of a Commission appointed for that purpose under the law. The Commission is active today and its members are putting into order matters that pertain to their duties as per the laws. The finding of all lands that are not to be owned by someone, as well as the leasing, selling, and dividing of lands that are recognized as lands fitting to be homes for people without homesteads for themselves. This idea was devised by Mr. S. B. Dole while he was a member of the Legislature for a session under the monarchy.

It seems that this was what he focused on, for the good of those without. He kept at this idea until it became law, amidst much skepticism by friends and fellow representatives.

But he did not relent until he succeeded, and now he is working to move forward his loving idea for his fellow man, to increase, and to make prosperous, the poor people. Under his law and its revisions, this Government Lands Commission was created.

At this time, the Commission is trying to carefully carry out their duties so that the lahui will not once again be hurt like under the benefits intended for the masses with the quiet land titles in the time of Kauikeaouli’s rule. They are surveying parcels from areas suited for a man and his family to live. The doors to this great right is opened and Hawaiians will receive land before all other ethnicities and then thereafter those from the outside. There are some Hawaiians taking advantage of this opportunity, along with some haole and other ethnicities. But the majority of those that know of the good offered up by this law are the people of foreign lands, the ones who know the value of land for which one is able to say that he is patriotic to the land of his birth.

By this law, power is give to advertise land to those who claim land for themselves, under the condition that they cannot use it for profit. The land is available to those without land or those with wetlands of less than an acre under his name, or under the husband or wife in some other area of the archipelago; they will live on the land for six years after the request for land and should they meet the qualifications under the law, the applicant will receive a lease or 999 years. The requirements for the application and stipulations of the lease are shown in full in sections 31–54 of the Land Act of 1895.

[Just as it is today, it was back then. Different newspapers and sources had different stances. It is perhaps not best thing to base your opinions on a single article or the words of a single person. It is important to try and see all that was written and handed down in other ways (for ink and paper is not necessarily the best way that information is passed down), and then decide what you think on the subject…

Oh, and see here for the Land Act of 1895.]

(Oiaio Puka La, 4/3/1896, p. 2)

NA AINA AUPUNI.

Ka Oiaio Puka La, Buke I, Helu 67, Aoao 2. Aperila 3, 1896.

A small window into Koolauloa and Koolaupoko—150 years ago, 1862.

Rice and Gold.

Some days ago, we had reason to travel about Koolaupoko and Koolauloa, and because of the many wonderful and beneficial things for the people we witnessed in our travels, we are publishing what we saw before us.

PERTAINING TO KEKELE.

We saw some Loi perfect for growing rice; however, we are sad to state that they were fallow and it was not weeded, they were just left wild. Fine is the road from the pali of Nuuanu until

KANEOHE

In this land, it is green from one side to the other, which attests to the non-lazy lifestyle of the people there; the land has ample water, but one thing which saddened us a bit was the seeing of some loi that were left fallow next to the river there on the Heeia side, which caused us to ponder, “Why are these loi not farmed, and planted with rice? They are fine loi supplied and full of water, very good for rice growing. Does our lack of faith and our desire to while away our time still persist? We must discard those feelings, and heed the land, and it will supply us with items that will make this life pleasant. We left that place feeling sad, and travelled on to

HEEIA.

There is not much we saw there, and we went on quickly to

KAHALUU.

There, our eyes were shown things that eased our hearts because of our great joy, when we saw that the kamaaina there did work, and that they did much farming. The one who is leasing the land has started to plant rice; there are perhaps six or more acres. But the somewhat sad thing is the majority of the land suitable for rice cultivation in that Ahupuaa, are just left there without being all farmed; when will it be that if the time is right, we will quickly make up our minds to grasp opportunities to make ourselves rich? Time keeps going quickly. And what of us? Here is what we say, to wake up and to plant your unused loi with rice.

KAALAEA

A haole there is planting rice, and we hear that it is going well; because he resides there, the work is progressing, and our hopes go with him and those others that are working at this valuable endeavor for us Hawaiians and the nation of our beloved Alii.

WAIAHOLE TO KAAAWA.

Waiahole is the first place, in our knowledge, that planted rice; when we began to walk upon the soil of that ahupuaa, our hearts were filled with joy at the sights of that place, and reaching Waikane, all the loi were being farmed, as if it was just one huge farm; we thought to ask who was it that was farming the area, and we were told Messrs. Judd and Wilder (Kale of Kauka and Waila) [Kale of Kauka must be Charles Hastings Judd, the son of Kauka (Gerrit Parmele Judd); so many loi were finely built, and it seemed like almost thirty or more acres; they had thirty-five workers. We see the immediate benefits of growing rice, being that these men were hired, and got paid for their labor, and all this is because of rice; many subjects of the King were provided with jobs, and as a result, perhaps some of those people were prevented from acts which would have caused them to suffer difficulties and problems, because their minds are taken up by work. There are many Loi farmed in Waikane, by J. Fuller (J. Pula), and they are being reworked. The road from Waiahole to Waikane is horrible; it is swampy, and we hear that a horse sunk on this street and its throat was cut. The lower part is boggy, but it is dry on the surface of the earth. There is a fine wooden house standing in Kualoa belonging to Charles Hastings Judd, along with a horse shed, and a carriage house; that place is beginning to become a town.

KAAWA.

This land has a fine appearance, but we did not see a single person who started to grow rice; that is where Mr. Wilder (Waila) resides with a nice wooden house there, with other connected buildings, and life there is luxurious. The road from Kualoa until this land is not good, and in our travels, it was terribly slippery because rain had fallen upon it. After leaving that land and the adjoining lands, we arrived at

KAHANA.

We saw nothing new there, but they did have some rice fields which were located in the uplands; we did not go to see it for ourselves, we just heard of them from the kamaaina; J. M. Kapena and Asing Apakana are the ones doing the farming.

PUNALUU.

This is the rice growing lands of Dr. [Seth] Ford (Kauka Poka) them; they built a wooden house for themselves and a halau for the workers who number 35, and they work without any complaints. Dr. Ford them slaughter two cows as meat for their men for a week. The area that was plowed up is between thirty and forty acres and it is ready to be planted with rice. The work there progresses due to the good treatment by the bosses to their workers; they are anxious to work for Dr. Ford. We all know that if we treat others well, we will be treated well and with aloha.

HAUULA.

We saw some well-farmed land to the southwest of the Church, and the land all about is green. This shows the benefits of the recent showers.

“HOWLAND’SVILLE,” LAIE.

We arrived there at 4 in the evening, and met pleasantly with the Konohiki of that land, and rested our limbs at his house. Captain H. S. Howland (Haulani), the Konohiki of that land is starting to build a wooden house there. Here however is the problem, that being the long wait for the lumber and the other house building materials, because of the delay and the inattentiveness of the captains of the ships that travel there; we believe that if there was a ship that went regularly to Koolaupoko and landed at the harbor of Koolauloa, the materials needed for the Owners [of land] would always be there. After making a start at the home of the landowner, we went to the houses of those living on the land, and we were urged on by an astonishing idea, to question the people of that area about their life under their new landlord. And we are happy to report to our friends, their answer was that their life was very pleasant, without any admonishments or reproach; and because of their great aloha and appreciation for Capt. Howland, they went and gave him many gifts—taro, pig, chicken, and many other things, without pay; it was as if he was a native-born alii; also, they all went quickly to assist him, with things that Capt. Howland needed, on their own accord, without being coerced by him. One kamaaina of that area did not touch work in the least when the land was under the previous Konohiki, but with Capt. Howland, he came to work industriously without complaint, but enthusiastically, without being forced to. The new Land owner of Laie lives together with the people of his land, like brothers of the same family. How pleasant is the life of people like that!

The reason for their love is because their landlord gives them many things, and does not just burden them, or put a restriction on plants or things from the sea. The one who owns the land just wants to live together in peace, and to search for together things that will benefit them all. How could there be no appreciation and love if we treat others well? It is good to remember this, to remind us to treat others with aloha, so that we are loved, when the day comes where we will be blessed to become land owners.

GOLD IN KAHALUU.

There was so much commotion amongst the Hawaiians and haole at the news that there was Gold in Kahaluu; there were many people who came from Honolulu to the place where Gold was thought to be. Many Hawaiians from Koolaupoko came with Oo, Pickaxes, Shovels and other things, preparing them to dig.

When it was heard that there was real Gold on that land, the news flew from house to house like firebrand. Those who first spotted it went immediately, making ready with dynamite powder. However, before those people who first witnessed the Gold reached Kahaluu, the news reached the people of that land, and they were roused. Therefore, about 60 kanaka maoli and 2 haole got together with weapons to expel all those who came to that area thought to have Gold. So when the haole came that wanted to ascertain the truth or falsehood of the Gold of that place, they were sent away.

Following that time, a hole was bored into a rock to place dynamite and explode to see if there was Gold within it or not. People stood together there waiting in anticipation for the rock to break.

In the evening of the 18th, the hole dug in the rock was finally deep enough, and it was blasted, and the rock was shattered, the tiny pieces flew. There was however no Gold found. Many pieces were taken to Honolulu, and were looked at by experts, but there was no Gold found.

[Under all the disparaging comments and the obvious push for rice cultivation, you can glean some historical information of what the windward side of Oahu looked like a 150 years ago. There are followup articles in the papers speaking of how the true gold of Hawaii is found through farming the land…

For more information on the history of rice in Hawaii, see: RICE IN HAWAII: A GUIDE TO HISTORICAL RESOURCES, compiled and annotated by Karol Haraguchi.]

(Kuokoa, 2/22/1862, p. 2)

Ka Raiki a me ke Gula.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 13, Aoao 2. Feberuari 22, 1862.

Hawaiian-Language Newspapers and the past and the future, 1906.

The History of Your Native Land.

As we contemplate the main reason for the falling far behind of the Hawaiian people in matters dealing with the history of their homeland, their lahui, and the alii of the land, we are all racked with intense pain at the haphazard and total lack of knowledge in this terribly important study; and it would not be wrong for us to say that it should be one of the first subjects that should be taught to the students at schools of higher education across the world; and it is said by the Orators that being knowledgeable in the History of your Motherland is the first step in Politics where you’d be able to fight for the good of the Rule of the Nation.

And understanding the histories of all Nations is what will prepare you to fight intelligently on legal grounds for the benefit of your lahui. In the teachings of the Great Book, in Jeremiah 6:16, Jehovah says to us:

“Stand ye in the ways and see and ask for the old paths. Where is the good way?”

O Lahui, how will we be able to ask of the right way if we do not know the old history of our Beloved Aina?

This lack of knowledge of the history of this people comes from not consistently reading the Hawaiian newspapers. Something frequently seen is one person buying a paper and reading it before his friends. They hear it but they don’t retain it like one who subscribes to the paper, who can re-read it at his leisure and thus commit to memory the information.

Learn from this instruction, and do as the haole, who buys his very own newspapers to educate himself in current events.

[The Hawaiian-Language Newspapers is a massive history book—a history on the most part told by Hawaiians living while the “history” was happening. As it was argued more than a hundred years ago, in order to fight for things like Sovereignty, Land, and Water, shouldn’t we know the history as told by Hawaiians? Perhaps we shouldn’t focus solely on what is written down in law books, but also on what Hawaiians actually said and did about these laws, about water rights, about land ownership, about fishing bans, etc., etc. etc.?

For sure this is no easy task. The original newspapers aren’t going to last forever. The current images for many of them are not totally clear (if there are images at all). They need to be word-searchable so that if you search for something, you will find it. There needs to be more people doing translations of them. But then again, Kamehameha Paiea didn’t exclaim, “Forward my younger brothers and drink of the sweet waters”…]

(Na’i Aupuni, 1/17/1906, p. 2)

Ka Moolelo o Kou Aina Oiwi.

Ka Na'i Aupuni, Buke I, Helu 44, Aoao 2. Ianuari 17, 1906.