The latest from Hilo, 1898.

THE NEWS FROM NORTH HILO.

Mr. Editor of the Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian People:

Aloha oe:—Please include this bit of news from here in North Hilo.

On the first of this month, Pakele, Iaukea, Laika, Kalei, and Lahapa went to go pick opihi on the shore of Waipunalei, and upon their return, they climbed up the pali. Lahapa was the first to climb up and the rest followed. When they reached the midpoint up the pali, a rocked dislodged and hit Lapaha square on the chest and he rolled down the pali, and because of the love of God, he was caught on a pandanus tree that was burned earlier in a fire. It was 40 feet high from where he tumbled from to where he was caught. Therefore, O my sisters and brothers and younger siblings, don’t go pick opihi again and return upland of the pali, lest you end up dying. Continue reading

Advertisements

Death of Joseph Kaaua Kaaa, 1918.

MY HINANO LEI HAS GONE

Mr. Solomon Hanohano, Aloha between the two of us strangers:—May it please your honor to welcome my bundle of hinano lei in a open space of your office and it will be you who carries it to the four corners of this globe, so that the family, friends, and the many people of my dear hinano lei, my husband, will know that he has passed on and that he left me and our beloved lei grieving for him in this world.

On Thursday, July 11, 1918, at 4 p. m., my dear Joseph K. Kaaa grew weary of this life and and silently moved on alone to the other side of the dark river of death, leaving me behind, burdened with our beloved lei. Auwe, how pained is my heart! No more is my dear Joseph Kaaua Kaaa, my companion for all places.

O Kukalahale Rain, you will no longer see his eyes, no more will will hear his voice, and he will not tread upon your streets.

Auwe, my sadness and grief for my dear husban who has gone afar; no more will I see his features; no more will I hear his voice; no more, no more for all times!

Continue reading

A mele for Queen Kapiolani by the Kawaihau Glee Club, 1879.

HE LEI NO KAPIOLANI

[Composed by the Kawaihau Glee Club, Kapaa, Kauai]

1

E aha ana Moikeha
I ka lihi-kai o Puna?
E ana ana i ka loa,
I ka laula o Kapaa.

Cho.—O ka pa kolonahe a ke Kiu,
Hoolale waianuhea,
Kilikilihune mai ana,
I ka liko lehua a Pane [apane]. Continue reading

The winds of Haena, Kauai and beyond, 1906.

[Found under: “KA MOOLELO o Hiiaka-i-ka-poli-o-Pele.”]

A Kalahale is the wind of Haena

A Limahuli is the wind of Haena

A Kolokini is the surfing wind of Kahuanui and Lohiauipo in Haena

A Unukupua is the voice-carrying wind of Lohiauipo in Haena

A Kanaenae is the fragrance-carrying wind of Lohiauipo in Haena

A Kilauea is the love-snatching wind of Lohiau in Haena

A Leoikua is the love-carrying wind of Lohiau in Haena

A Iponoenoelauae is the woman-fetching wind of Lohiauipo in Haena

Much aloha for Lohiauipo, my lover in Haena Continue reading

Winds and rains of Hana, Maui, 1877.

[Found under: “No Hana me ko laila noho ana.”]

The winds.—There are two places where the wind constantly blows, from the ocean, and from the land. There are two names of the winds from the ocean, the Koholapehu and the Koholalele. The Koholapehu is the rainy wind from the ocean; and the Koholalele is the calm wind from the ocean that has no rain, it is a rain that fans the clouds allowing you to clearly see the sheer cliffs of Hawaii. The Lauawa is the cold wind upland of the land which blows softly atop Kaihuakala and comes lovingly together with the waves of Keanini; that is the wind that carries the sweet fragrance of the pandanus of Kahalaowaka, having it intermingle with the waters of Punahoa. Continue reading