The famous rain of Hilo, 1870.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO: Hawaii.”]

The Famous Rain of Hilo.—The messengers depart; the raindrops pour down of the famous Kanilehua rain. Continue reading

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Zakaria Hapuku and Hana Ihuanu first make their way to the Marquesas, 1861.

Hokuao sets sail.

On Friday, at 5 o’clock in the evening, the fine missionary ship set sail. It was made to sail quickly to take with it goods for the Hawaiian missionaries living in Fatuhiva, because of their difficulties faced with the wars of those people who are fond of revolts. When it sailed, the Hoolua wind blew a little stronger, Continue reading

Hula graduation [uniki] in Kahakuloa, Maui, 1875.

[Found under: “NO KE KALANA O KAHAKULOA A ME KONA MAU HIOHIONA.”]

Mixed-up news. On this 12th of June, there was a feast loudly given for a uniki for the hula uliuli, under the leadership of a youth, William Kamalahea; he is from the land of the Kilioopu wind, and he taught some from this District the hula uliuli, Continue reading

Latest from Waikapu, 1875.

[Found under: Na mea hou o na Waieha.”]

Pertaining to Waikapu.—On the 1st of August of this year, the Congregation of Waikapu decided to work on their church immediately, and these are the main things. The old church, to extend the stone walls 4 feet higher, and to arch the windows, and to fix the cracks in the stone walls. The carpenter that will do this is Ninihua; he says that the church will be completed for $2,300, and it is with this that the building will be complete along with his pay. According the this carpenter, with this money the church and the bell tower will be completed.

There are two Hawaiian hula houses in Waikapu; those who join in the hula are church members as well as non-church members. Many go to those houses, but the truly devout, they do not go. That is what I see when I visited this place, the land famous for the Kololio wind.

[This is part of a longer description by a person calling himself, Mose Malihinihele, of Honolulu.]

(Lahui Hawaii, 8/18/1875, p. 2)

LahuiHawaii_8_18_1875_2

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 34, Aoao 2. Augate 19, 1875.

Frightening story from Wananalua, Hana! 1859.

Strong Rain and Wind.

O Hae Hawaii:

Aloha oe:—On the 4th of April, it was a calm day; it was a day that Hana people drove in flying fish [malolo] into nets, and the young flying fish came  back; in the evening, Kaanaana and Malulu went deep water fishing with hook and line, and not long after, the wind and rain came; Kaanaana quickly pulled up the anchor [pohaku], and Malulu urged Kanaana, “Cut the line and let’s paddle at once.” Kaanaana pulled up all the line into the canoe. They paddled for shore, but they did not reach it; there was a lot of rain and wind and they could not paddle away, the canoe went back, and the shore grew dark and could not be seen; they  were lost at sea, it became dark, there was great rain and wind, and great lightning and thunder that night. They flipped over twice and the opening of the canoe was turned underneath, and they righted the canoe, and Malulu lost his paddle and the canoe only had one left. The canoe turned over with the billows and they were in danger of death for the second time. That night became day, that was the fith day, and the canoe did not turn over that day. That day turned into night; there was no calm and the land could not be seen; there was much rain and wind. They nearly died twice that night, and the ama of the canoe came off; Kaanaana jumped to it and binded the ama fast; they sat and the canoe was once again overturned by the billows, and they  were in danger of death again; that was the fourth time they were in peril. It became day, and it was the sixth day; the wind died down a bit but the rain was strong; they sat in the canoe without food or clothing. Continue reading