Travels of King Kamehameha IV to see the sounding sands of Nohili and more, 1856.

THE CIRCUIT OF THE KING.

We hear of the sailing of the King from here, and on the next day he landed at Waimea, Kauai, and that night, he sailed to Niihau, and landed at Nonopapa on Saturday [la hoomalolo]. They spent the Sabbath there, and joined together and worshiped Jehovah on that day. On the weekday, the rode horse, fished; there are a 100 or more horses on Niihau; they caught a lot of fish. That evening, they got on board the Maria and sailed for Kaula. The next morning they reached there. Some of them jumped into the ocean and swam ashore with difficulty, for there was a shark there and it was difficult to go ashore; there is a severe cliff and no bay. The King went ashore amongst these difficulties, ascended the cliff. The chiefesses remained on the ship. Continue reading

Advertisements

Speaking of Waoala, does anyone know of its location? 1876.

Waoala, Waialua.

O Ka Lahui Hawaii;—Aloha:

While we were living in the calm of the forests moistened by the cold beads of dew of the mountains while we reveled in the sweet calls of the birds and enjoyed the swaying of the trees that were lush with dark green foliage of the forests, as the cool scent of maile wafted strongly from all around where we sat. The thought to write some sentences was induced, and these are they:—

You may be wondering about the name Waoala. That place is in the mountains of Waialua. There perhaps is no other fine place like it, if we are not mistaken. Continue reading

Latest from Waikapu, 1875.

[Found under: Na mea hou o na Waieha.”]

Pertaining to Waikapu.—On the 1st of August of this year, the Congregation of Waikapu decided to work on their church immediately, and these are the main things. The old church, to extend the stone walls 4 feet higher, and to arch the windows, and to fix the cracks in the stone walls. The carpenter that will do this is Ninihua; he says that the church will be completed for $2,300, and it is with this that the building will be complete along with his pay. According the this carpenter, with this money the church and the bell tower will be completed.

There are two Hawaiian hula houses in Waikapu; those who join in the hula are church members as well as non-church members. Many go to those houses, but the truly devout, they do not go. That is what I see when I visited this place, the land famous for the Kololio wind.

[This is part of a longer description by a person calling himself, Mose Malihinihele, of Honolulu.]

(Lahui Hawaii, 8/18/1875, p. 2)

LahuiHawaii_8_18_1875_2

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 34, Aoao 2. Augate 19, 1875.

More on the Ceylon, 1882.

The Ceylon at Hilo.

Our thanks are tendered to the writer of the following interesting sketch:

The English steamer Ceylon left Hilo for San Francisco at half-past nine o’clock on Monday morning, April 17th. Owing to the absence from Hilo of Judge Lyman, the Japanese Embassy were taken in charge by Fred. Lyman, Jr., who furnished them with mules for the volcano, and attended to all the details of the trip and of their stay in Hilo, and escorted them on board the Ceylon at 4 P. M. on Sunday, the hour set for sailing.

Continue reading

Queen Liliuokalani’s circuit around the island, 1891.

THE ROYAL TOUR.

Her Majesty the Queen was entertained at Makao, near Hauula, Koolauloa, on Saturday by Mr. Lane and other prominent Hawaiians of that locality. In the afternoon, the Queen went  out canoe riding, the canoe being drawn by a lively span of horses by means of ropes attached to the canoe.The horses were ridden at full gallop, the canoe skimming along the surface of the water at a lively rate. After the novel canoe ride Her Majesty and many others went out sea bathing. Continue reading