Hae Hawaii Volume 3 starts, 1858.

To be Published

KA HAE HAWAII, VOLUME 3,

AT THE OFFICE OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION [HALE AOPALAPALA], Honolulu, every Wednesday, beginning on the 7th of April, 1858. J. Fuller [J. PULA] Editor.

This is the cost of the newspaper: For one year, 52 papers, $1.50, paid in advance. If however there are many subscribers of the Hae in one district, the luna of that district may slightly lessen the cost of the Hae, and this is how the decrease will be: If the luna gets 10 subscribers or more per one bundle, then he can lessen the cost to $1.25 for the paper for a year; This is the rule for the Hae of 1858: When you pay in advance for the cost, then you will receive the paper; we will not send a single paper if we do not receive payment first, and then we will send the paper.

This is the cost for printing Advertisements: If it is 12 lines or less, it is a $1.00 for the first printing, and a quarter for the second printing, and so forth.

Send all letters for the Hae Hawaii to J. Pula, at the Office of the Board of Education, Honolulu.

THE LUNA OF THE HAE HAWAII FOR THE YEAR 1858.

HAWAII.

Hilo and Puna, ….. Rev. T. Coan (Koana.)
Kau, Kipimana, ….. W. C. Shipman
South Kona, ….. D. H. Nahinu.
North Kona, ….. Rev. T. E. Taylor.
South Kohala and Hamakua, ….. Rev. L. Lyons (Laiana.)
North Kohala, ….. Rev. E. Bond (Bona.)

MAUI.

Lahaina, District 1, ….. Rev. J. F. Pogue.
District 2, ….. E. Bailey, Esq. (Bele.)
District 3, ….. M. Kapihe.
District 4, ….. Rev. W. O. Baldwin.
Lanai along with Lahaina.
MOLOKAI, ….. E. Hitchcock.

OAHU.

Honolulu, ….. Solomona and P. Naone.
Kapalama, and beyond, ….. Kahina.
Makiki, and beyond, ….. Keawelohelii.
Ewa, ….. H. U. Mahi.
Waianae, ….. G. H. E. Keauiole.
Waialua, ….. J. W. Keawehunahala.
Koolauloa, ….. M. Kuaea.
Koolaupoko, ….. Rev. B. W. Parker.

KAUAI.

Waimea and Niihau, ….. Rev. G. B. Rowell.
Koloa, ….. Rev. J. W. Smith.
Nawiliwili and Wailua, ….. Elikai.
District 4 and District 5, ….. Rev. E. Johnson.

(Hae Hawaii, 4/28/1858, p. 1)

HaeHawaii_4_28_1858_1

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 3, Ano Hou.—-Helu 4, Aoao 1. Aperila 28, 1858.

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Ka Lahui Hawaii newspaper begins, 1875.

THE NEWSPAPER KA LAHUI HAWAII.

This is a paper printed weekly for the Families and the Churches of Hawaii; it is something to assist with the proper living of families, with peace amongst people, and with the well being of the body and spirit of the Hawaiian People. “Envieth not, vaunteth not thyself, do not be easily provoked, thinketh no evil.” Continue reading

New newspaper, “Ka Momi o ka Pakipika”? 1898.

KA MOMI O KA PAKIPIKA.

A Weekly newspaper with enjoyable stories for the Hawaiian Home which are translated straight from very famous story books, and which will be printed with their very own pictures to adorn its delicate body for the benefit of the public, and it will be printed with some scholarly items. Continue reading

“Ka Leo o ka Lehulehu” weekly Hawaiian newspaper, 1912.

A NEW WEEKLY NEWSPAPER, “KA LEO O KA LEHULEHU”

There is a new weekly newspaper appearing in Hilo. We learned of this because the office of the treasury of the Territory received notice in the morning last Saturday, by that office receiving a letter explaining that a weekly newspaper, “Ka Leo o ka Lehulehu” was ready to be printed every Friday at the printing office of the Hawaii Herald Publishing Company. Continue reading

History of volcanic activities and why the newspapers need to be rescanned as clearly as possible, 1868–for the present, for the future.

[Found under: “Ke Ahi Pele Nui ma Hawaii. NA OLAI KUPINAI. KE KAI HOEE NUI! MAKE WELIWELI MA KAU! Na Palapala a na Makamaka mai Hawaii mai, eia iho malalo:”]

On Thursday at 3 in the afternoon, that being the 2nd of this April, there came a great powerful earthquake, and people could not stand upright, and so too the animals. The soil of the earth spew up into the sky like smoke and hills tumbled down; large trees fell, and some of the valleys were filled, and houses fell; the number of houses which fell numbered 30 or more; and 3 churches fell, the churches of Kahuku and Waiohinu and Punaluu; and there is a large pit at Kahuku that is 80 feet in circumference and 350 feet or more deep, and from within this pit rose steam like the steam of the volcanic crater; the distance from the port of Kaalualu to this pit is 6 miles or so; and there are many other deeds carried out by God. Continue reading