Queen Emma portrait offered for 1881 subscription of Kuokoa, 1880.

THE

KUOKOA NEWSPAPER

FOR 1881!

“While the rain is still in the sky, clear the fields below.”

“Time and tide wait for no man; we need to be prepared.”

Therefore, O Friends of

“The Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian Nation.”

Make ready for the benefits of the

KUOKOA

carried and place before you for the new coming year. Continue reading

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Provisional Government promoting Nupepa Kuokoa Puka La, 1893.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.”]

“Ka Leo o ka Lahui,” Hon. J. E. Bush’s daily, is now under the management of Hon. Joseph Nawahi, of Hilo, Hawaii. Continue reading

John Taylor Unea, agent for “Ke Aloha Aina” in Kalaupapa, 1917.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

To all the people of Kalaupapa, Molokai, who want a paper this coming year, A. D. 1918; leave your subscription with John T. Unea, along with the money. This will be an important year for us ahead, that being the politics of the Territory, therefore, we should not live in darkness.

(Aloha Aina, 12/28/1917, p. 2)

AlohaAina_12_28_1917_2.png

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 52, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 28, 1917.

Joseph U. Kawainui announces intent to publish a new paper run by Hawaiians, 1877.

BRAND NEW NEWSPAPER!

Pride of the Hawaiians.

As a result of the great desire of the people that a new Hawaiian newspaper be published under the management of a Hawaiian, therefore, I agree, and the Issue I of that new paper will be printed on Thursday, the 3rd of January, 1878, and thereafter, every Saturday.

It will be as large as the “Kuokoa,” and the cost for the year will be Two Dollars up front, or One Dollar for Six Months paid in advance.

I will exert myself along with skilled Hawaiians to make this new newspaper a newspaper that Hawaiians can be educated in the pressing issues of the day, Continue reading

Hawaiian Newspapers, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.

For a long time, I was sure that anybody who was interested in Hawaiian moolelo, whether it be language, or history, or mele, or kaao, or genealogy, or education, or winds/rains, or thought would know that there are online generations and generations of newspapers available online, whether it be in English (at http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/) or Hawaiian (at http://papakilodatabase.com/pdnupepa/cgi-bin/pdnupepa?a=q). It seems that I was wrong.

If you have by chance to an opportunity to spread the word that there are available word-searchable Hawaiian newspapers that you can look through for different ways to look at history, please do.

It is time that we look at history in different ways.