Maori newspaper, 1875.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Te Wananga.–This is the title of a New Zealand newspaper of sixteen pages which we obtained. The words within are of New Zealand [Maori] with some paragraphs in English. Taking a look, it was joyful to see firsthand that the New Zealand language is very similar to our language, the Hawaiians.

(Kuokoa, 10/23/1875, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIV, Helu 43, Aoao 2. Okatoba 23, 1875.

A National Press, 1844.

A Press for the Nation. The treasury board purchased a press for the government and a newspaper [pepa hoolaha ike] as well, in English. And J. J. Jarves has become the editor for the national press. It was his paper previously.

(Nonanona, 7/23/1844, p. 41)

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 7, Aoao 41. Iulai 23, 1844.

Newspaper out of Makawao? 1865

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

A Printer at Makawao.—A paper printed at the press of the girls’ school at Makawao arrived at our business office. And being that we see it is a new thing being done there, we therefore extend our great praise for the girls who perhaps set the type and printed it on their press. And here are the words printed by them in Hawaiian [olelo kanaka]: May the parents, friends, and neighbors know that Thursday, the 28th of Dec., will be the examination of Makawao College at the protestant church in Makawao. Come all who wish.” It is published in Hawaiian and in English.

(Kuokoa, 12/23/1865, 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 51, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 23, 1865.

What are you doing tomorrow at 2:00?

Papakilo Database on Hawaiian language newspapers!

If you are free tomorrow afternoon, check out the webinar on Hawaiian language newspapers put on by Papakilo Database and Awaiaulu. Click the image below to be taken to the registration page!

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_fOxuRC5_QcyXB5Yex40Gkg

Edwin M. Desha fights for Ka Hoku o Hawaii, 1938.

Eddie Desha is Trying All Means to Save “Ka Hoku o Hawaii”

An effort to perpetuate the Hawaiian language and a Newspaper published in that language is being made in Hilo.

Eddie Desha, the nephew of the late Senator Stephen L. Desha Sr., is making this determined effort, with the courage and persistence which characterized his uncle, one of Hawaii’s noted orators and legislators.

Besides a small monthly magazine published by the Hawaiian Board of Missions [Ka Hoaloha], there now remains only one weekly newspaper printed in the native Hawaiian language of Hawaii. It is Ka Hoku o Hawaii (Star of Hawaii), published in Hilo by the Star of Hawaii Publishing Co., Ltd., of which W. H. Beers, Hilo attorney, is president, and Edwin M. Desha is treasurer and manager. Continue reading

Publishing a newspaper wasn’t easy! 1868.

KE ALAULA.

Have you not thought about, O People who frequently read this newspaper, with amazement at the beauty of your monthly paper, while asking yourself, “Who publishes this paper? and who puts in effort into writing down the ideas, and into the printing, and into the distributing?” Maybe you just thought they just appear; no, consider the amount of work and expense it takes to prepare this thing which gives you enjoyment, and be educated. Just grabbing it and quickly looking at the illustrations, reading quickly through the short ideas, and then discarding it in a corner, or perhaps tearing it apart at once as a wrapper for some fish, or to wrap something else. Maybe you have complaints about not receiving it more frequently, every week; and you call it a slow paper—one publication per month. Continue reading

He Aupuni Palapala project’s new blog page, 2021.

It seems the newspaper project He Aupuni Palapala: Preserving and Digitizing the Hawaiian Language Newspapers at Bishop Museum started a blog page. Let’s keep an eye out for future posts from them!

He Aupuni Palapala blog page can be found by clicking this image:

The difference between information printed in books and information printed in the newspapers, 1834.

A Printing error.

On page four of this Ka Lama, there is a printing error. Here is what it said,

The farming stick [oo mahi] that they used in the olden times, was ule,¹ and alahee, and so forth; But this is what is correct, The farming stick that they used in the olden times was ulei,² and alahee, Continue reading