E please mai hoi oe, e ke aloha, 1920.

Those who are in debt in paying for the life of our Hoku newspaper, please keep its life in mind for the upcoming year. The cost of the paper used to print the Hoku is rising, and it is only fair for the people who are in debt to its life remember. Please.

[The subscription rate for the Hoku remained at $2.00 per year for its entire existence. The first privately run newspapers Hoku o ka Pakipika and Nupepa Kuokoa (from the 1860s) both went for that rate as well!

With the times being how they are, first, consider giving donations to food banks and organizations that are providing help to those in need physically and emotionally, and then second, perhaps consider giving a donation to the Library & Archives at Bishop Museum who care for much of the old newspapers and so much more history of Hawaii nei.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/16/1920, p. 4)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XIV, Helu 30, Aoao 4. Dekemaba 16, 1920.

Death of Emma Aima Nawahi, 1936.

THAT GREATLY BELOVED MATRIARCH DIES

MRS. EMMA NAWAHI LEAVES THIS LIFE
SHE WAS LIVING DEBILITATED FOR A LONG TIME AND PASSED AWAY

HILO, Hawaii, Dec. 28.—In the famous history of Hawaii nei, the name Mrs. Emma Aima Nawahi will be seen and known, from when there was hair upon figure, when the town of Hilo was very young, and the trains joined the two sides of Hamakua and Puna; at 6:30 this morning she left behind this life, and Leleiwi crossed its hands behinds its back, and the earth was left the earth’s, and His to Him.

At 2 in the afternoon on this coming Sunday, her funeral will be held at her home. After the funeral her body will be cremated and her ashes buried at the cemetery at Homelani.

She left behind one son, Alexander Nawahi of Hilo and three grandchildren.

When Mrs. Emma Aima Nawahi left this life, undone were the memories of the days when the alii of the land were living from this time of the new government. Mrs. Nawahi was a matriarch well known among the alii families of Hawaii nei, for her intelligence and for her becoming a leader for the lahui in those days when politics was strong, and her home in Hilo became the home of homes, the home that welcomed everyone and a place for travellers to rest.

She was part Chines, and her father was Tong Yee, and he was the very first Chinese to start growing sugarcane on the island of Hawaii, and her mother was Kahole-aua.

It was her father who first planted sugarcane on the land of Paukaa, and the first mill build on the island of Hawaii. Thereafter he entered into a partnership with John Ena Sr.

Mrs. Nawahi’s husband was the Hon. Joseph K. Nawahi, a member of the legislature of Hawaii nei for 20 years or more, and he was one of the political pillars who appointed Lunalilo as King for Hawaii nei. Mr. Nawahi was a powerful force opposing annexation, and in the year 1895 he established the Hawaiian Newspaper called “Ke Aloha Aina,” to express his political views.

Mrs. Nawahi was a member of the organizations Daughters of Hawaii, Kaahumanu Society, Hale o na Alii, Ahahui o na Wahine ma Hilo, a member of the Haili Church in Hilo, and so too of the American Red Cross.

(Alakai o Hawaii, 1/16/1936, p. 4)

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke VIII, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Ianuali 16, 1936.

The pillow mele for Kaahumanu, and the power of the newspapers, 1907.

One reason why the newspapers were/are so important was because they were “immediate,” just as I suppose Facebook and Twitter is today. One person claims something in the newspaper one day, and a few days later you could see more information or contradicting information by someone else, and not necessarily even in the same newspaper. Because people back in the day wanted the latest news, they would subscribe to the different newspapers being printed at the time, or at least would share them with each other. Continue reading

Ke Ola o Hawaii to begin, 1916.

BI-LINGUAL PAPER SOON TO BE LAUNCHED

HILO, February 19.—Ke Ola o Hawaii, or The Life of Hawaii, is the name of a new  weekly newspaper here for which articles of incorporation have been asked. The paper, which is to make its appearance next month, will be unique in that it will be published in both English and Hawaiian and also that it is to be strictly non-partisan. At least this is the assertion of the promoters and officers, who are of practically all political faiths. Continue reading

Newspaper history, continued, 1913.

Journalism at the Crossroads

(Continued From Page One.)

community being much interested in the doings and sayings of such public men as Roosevelt, Wilson, Taft, Bryan and other prominent figures.

Familiar Faces.

The pictures of these men, and others, appear in the Japanese dailies almost as frequently as they do in the American dailies. What congress is doing is also of absorbing interest. The probability of a reduction in the sugar tariff is viewed this way and that by the Japanese editors. No item of world’s news is neglected and everything that especially affects Hawaii is “played up” in true journalistic fashion. Continue reading

Newspaper history, 1913.

JOURNALISM AT THE CROSSROADS OF THE PACIFIC

If the newsboys of Honolulu carried under their arms copies of each newspaper in the city, besides those published in the English language, they would be pretty well loaded down and their calls would include the following journals, popular with thousands of readers to whom they cater: O Luso, Nupepa Kuokoa, Ke Aloha Aina, Ka Momi o Hawaii, Hawaii Shinpo, Japanese-Daily Chronicle, Nippu Jiji, Hawaii Hochi, Wah Hing Bo, Sun Chung Kwock Bo, Hon Mun Sun Bo, Chee Yow Shin Bo, United Korean News, Korean Times and many other that play an important part in their particular fields of activity. Continue reading