Two new Hawaiian newspapers! 1909.

There are two Hawaiian newspapers that will  be appearing very soon, Ka Lanakila, and newspaper published as a book and edited by G. K. Keawehaku, along with Ka Nupepa Waialeale of Kauai. Continue reading

What are you doing tomorrow at 2:00?

Papakilo Database on Hawaiian language newspapers!

If you are free tomorrow afternoon, check out the webinar on Hawaiian language newspapers put on by Papakilo Database and Awaiaulu. Click the image below to be taken to the registration page!

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_fOxuRC5_QcyXB5Yex40Gkg

Edwin M. Desha fights for Ka Hoku o Hawaii, 1938.

Eddie Desha is Trying All Means to Save “Ka Hoku o Hawaii”

An effort to perpetuate the Hawaiian language and a Newspaper published in that language is being made in Hilo.

Eddie Desha, the nephew of the late Senator Stephen L. Desha Sr., is making this determined effort, with the courage and persistence which characterized his uncle, one of Hawaii’s noted orators and legislators.

Besides a small monthly magazine published by the Hawaiian Board of Missions [Ka Hoaloha], there now remains only one weekly newspaper printed in the native Hawaiian language of Hawaii. It is Ka Hoku o Hawaii (Star of Hawaii), published in Hilo by the Star of Hawaii Publishing Co., Ltd., of which W. H. Beers, Hilo attorney, is president, and Edwin M. Desha is treasurer and manager. Continue reading

Publishing a newspaper wasn’t easy! 1868.

KE ALAULA.

Have you not thought about, O People who frequently read this newspaper, with amazement at the beauty of your monthly paper, while asking yourself, “Who publishes this paper? and who puts in effort into writing down the ideas, and into the printing, and into the distributing?” Maybe you just thought they just appear; no, consider the amount of work and expense it takes to prepare this thing which gives you enjoyment, and be educated. Just grabbing it and quickly looking at the illustrations, reading quickly through the short ideas, and then discarding it in a corner, or perhaps tearing it apart at once as a wrapper for some fish, or to wrap something else. Maybe you have complaints about not receiving it more frequently, every week; and you call it a slow paper—one publication per month. Continue reading

He Aupuni Palapala project’s new blog page, 2021.

It seems the newspaper project He Aupuni Palapala: Preserving and Digitizing the Hawaiian Language Newspapers at Bishop Museum started a blog page. Let’s keep an eye out for future posts from them!

He Aupuni Palapala blog page can be found by clicking this image:

The difference between information printed in books and information printed in the newspapers, 1834.

A Printing error.

On page four of this Ka Lama, there is a printing error. Here is what it said,

The farming stick [oo mahi] that they used in the olden times, was ule,¹ and alahee, and so forth; But this is what is correct, The farming stick that they used in the olden times was ulei,² and alahee, Continue reading

E please mai hoi oe, e ke aloha, 1920.

Those who are in debt in paying for the life of our Hoku newspaper, please keep its life in mind for the upcoming year. The cost of the paper used to print the Hoku is rising, and it is only fair for the people who are in debt to its life remember. Please.

[The subscription rate for the Hoku remained at $2.00 per year for its entire existence. The first privately run newspapers Hoku o ka Pakipika and Nupepa Kuokoa (from the 1860s) both went for that rate as well!

With the times being how they are, first, consider giving donations to food banks and organizations that are providing help to those in need physically and emotionally, and then second, perhaps consider giving a donation to the Library & Archives at Bishop Museum who care for much of the old newspapers and so much more history of Hawaii nei.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/16/1920, p. 4)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XIV, Helu 30, Aoao 4. Dekemaba 16, 1920.

Death of Emma Aima Nawahi, 1936.

THAT GREATLY BELOVED MATRIARCH DIES

MRS. EMMA NAWAHI LEAVES THIS LIFE
SHE WAS LIVING DEBILITATED FOR A LONG TIME AND PASSED AWAY

HILO, Hawaii, Dec. 28.—In the famous history of Hawaii nei, the name Mrs. Emma Aima Nawahi will be seen and known, from when there was hair upon figure, when the town of Hilo was very young, and the trains joined the two sides of Hamakua and Puna; at 6:30 this morning she left behind this life, and Leleiwi crossed its hands behinds its back, and the earth was left the earth’s, and His to Him.

At 2 in the afternoon on this coming Sunday, her funeral will be held at her home. After the funeral her body will be cremated and her ashes buried at the cemetery at Homelani.

She left behind one son, Alexander Nawahi of Hilo and three grandchildren.

When Mrs. Emma Aima Nawahi left this life, undone were the memories of the days when the alii of the land were living from this time of the new government. Mrs. Nawahi was a matriarch well known among the alii families of Hawaii nei, for her intelligence and for her becoming a leader for the lahui in those days when politics was strong, and her home in Hilo became the home of homes, the home that welcomed everyone and a place for travellers to rest.

She was part Chines, and her father was Tong Yee, and he was the very first Chinese to start growing sugarcane on the island of Hawaii, and her mother was Kahole-aua.

It was her father who first planted sugarcane on the land of Paukaa, and the first mill build on the island of Hawaii. Thereafter he entered into a partnership with John Ena Sr.

Mrs. Nawahi’s husband was the Hon. Joseph K. Nawahi, a member of the legislature of Hawaii nei for 20 years or more, and he was one of the political pillars who appointed Lunalilo as King for Hawaii nei. Mr. Nawahi was a powerful force opposing annexation, and in the year 1895 he established the Hawaiian Newspaper called “Ke Aloha Aina,” to express his political views.

Mrs. Nawahi was a member of the organizations Daughters of Hawaii, Kaahumanu Society, Hale o na Alii, Ahahui o na Wahine ma Hilo, a member of the Haili Church in Hilo, and so too of the American Red Cross.

(Alakai o Hawaii, 1/16/1936, p. 4)

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke VIII, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Ianuali 16, 1936.