“Eia o Awini pali alii hulaana,” 1924.

[Found under: “Hiamoe o Kamaka Stillman Iloko o ka Maha”]

The mele below is one of the things which proves that Kamehameha was raised by Kahaopulani and that he was raised at Awini, thus:

Eia o Awini pali alii hulaana,
E noho ana Kahaopulani,
Hanai ia Paiea he alii,
I kohola maloko Kekuiapoiwa, Continue reading

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Genealogy of Kahaopulani, 1911.

CORRECTION OF GENEALOGY

This is a reprinting of the genealogy of Kahaopulani, the royal caretaker who raised Kamehameha I. at Awini; and so that the number of children given birth by Kamaka Stillman in a direct line, and not just one daughter as was shown in the earlier printing in Issue 19, Volume II of Ke Au Hou, May 10, 1911: Continue reading

Kamaka Stillman refutes the story about Naeole raising Kamehameha, 1911.

A Response by “O-u-ka-maka-o-ka-wauke-oi-opiopio.”

Mr. Editor of Ke Au Hou:

With appreciation:—Please allow me my clarification pertaining to the one who raised Kamehameha I that was shown in the newspaper “Kuokoa Home Rula” on the 10th of February past, 1911, which said that it was Naeole. But forgive me for the tardiness of my response, for I soon received my issue of that paper mentioned above from a friend last week, and in order that the actual person who raised Kamehameha I is made known, that it is not Naeole as is being stated, that is why I am publishing this without intent to elevate chiefly genealogy, for the rude statements are embarrassing; there are so many people who are associated with alii, and covetous of alii who have genealogies that are printed in books. Pertaining to the parentage of Kamehameha, here it is: Continue reading

Mary Jane Fayerweather Montano story part 3, 1893.

Former Belle Tells Of Honolulu Society In Far-Off ‘Sixties’

Mrs. Montano Continues Her Charming Reminiscences of Old Hawaii; Notable Characters and Incidents Revived After Six Decades During Which Community Has Moved Far, Far Away From  Them

BY MARY JANE FAYERWEATHER MONTANO

(Continued from last Sunday)

A year or more after the smallpox epidemic, which swept our Islands in 1853, came a greater shock to the Hawaiian nation. King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, died, the loved one of the Hawaiian people. Every man, woman and child wept. After a few days the Palace gates were opened to the public and there was also a call to all to cover the streets with fine grass. I went out for grass which was to be found in the kalo patches. The kalo patches were not very far from Beretania street in those days. I did not follow the others, but I went right into the King’s gardens, called Beretania, where the Episcopal Cathedral now stands. I stepped into a kalo patch and picked an armful of the soft grass. Tears blinded my eyes. I thought of the day when His Majesty called to see my mother. He ran his fingers through my  hear, and asked my mother, “Is this your little ‘white hair'”? Mother answered, “Yes”. Continue reading

Mary Jane Fayerweather Montano story part 2, 1893.

PERSONAL REMINISCENCES OF OLD-TIME HAWAII AND NOTED ACTORS IN STIRRING DRAMA

How Many of the Chiefs Joined in the California Gold Rush and Died of Frontier Hardships; Terrors of Smallpox Scourge of 1853 When Thousands Died Throughout Islands

By MARY JANE FAYERWEATHER MONTANO

(Continued from last Sunday)

CAPT. GEORGE BECKLEY, my grandfather, concerning whom I dwelt at length in the beginning of my story of  olden Hawaii, keeps well in the foreground of my thoughts, for not only was he the first haole to become a member of our Hawaiian family, but he played an important part in the affairs of the Hawaiian Islands, for whenever the King held council (and I am referring to Kamehameha the Great), he called his haoles in, and Captain Beckley was one of them.

In 1870, whilst I was on a visit to Kona,  Hawaii, visiting the home of Judge Hoapili, at Keauhou, we went to see our alii, Ruth, at Hulihee. She pointed out to me the large hau tree back of the house, the old royal palace, and said: Continue reading

Genealogy of George Kaiwalani Dwight, 1918.

A LOVING EULOGY.

With a heavy heart for my Heavenly Lord, who has passed on the path of no return, for you, O George Kaiwalani Dwight, you are a heavenly one, a first born of the alii of Maui, a navel string and umbilical cord from Kekaulike (m) and Kekuiapoiwanui (f), who gave birth to Kamehameha-nui, who was raised on luau [Kamehamehanuiailuau], and Keaka (f), an alii, a wohi, a sacred one. Continue reading