“Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii” published, 1961.

S. M. Kamakau, whose writings provided much of the material used by author Alexander in his “Brief History” which appears weekly on these pages, will be honored on Monday as a collection of his manuscripts is published by the Kamehameha Schools Press under the title of “Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii.”The 440-page book, regarded as an invaluable addition to works on Isle history, goes on sale tomorrow at the Bishop Museum and at leading Honolulu book stores.

[This famous Hawaiian was born in Ewa, at Mokuleia, Waialua, on Oahu, on the 29th of October, 1815. Continue reading

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One hundred and fifty years ago, Au Okoa announces Kamakau’s history to continue in its columns, 1869.

Hawaiian History:—Seen on the first page of our paper this morning is the Hawaiian History written by our writer of history, S. M. Kamakau; Continue reading

150 years ago, people were reading about the arrival of Catholicism, in S. M. Kamakau’s great history, 1869.

THE HISTORY OF HAWAII.

By S. M. Kamakau.

NUMBER 97.

Pertaining to the Reign of Kauikeaouli over the Nation, he being called Kamehameha III.

Pertaining to the arrival of Catholicism, in the year 1827 [1837].

In the month of September, in the year 1836. A Catholic priest [kahuna katolika Roma] arrived, the Rev. Aresaniao R. Walsh [Rev. Arsenius Robert Walsh], from Britain. He were not expelled, but was forbidden by the Chiefs, that he should not proselytize amongst the Hawaiians. But he went and argued with some Protestant priests [Kahuna Hoole Pope]. He indeed converted Hawaiians and secretly Baptized some people. Continue reading

Plagiarism? 1868.

The History of S. M. Kamakau.

Aloha no.—These past Saturdays I saw within Whitney’s newspaper [Pacific Commercial Advertiser] them calling the haole government paper [Hawaiian Gazette], a thief, because of the translation of the History of S. M. Kamakau, into the English language, and for inserting it within some past issues of that newspaper. In my opinion, those pebbles pelted in contempt are not right at all. Continue reading

On Kepelino’s “Traditions of Hawaii,” 1870.

Ka Moolelo Hawaii.

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha oe:—

Please carry before all of the experts this bit of the “Moolelo Hawaii” which I saw from the selections of John Zibilina Kahoalii. All of the the classes of the Chiefly Histories have been laid out properly from top to bottom, with  the lineages of each class.

Class 1. Ihu Hai [? Iku Hai] is the name of the class.
Ihu Nua [? Iku Nuu] is the second name.
Both names describe this one class; the line of this Class is shown by its Lineage.

Class 2. Ihu Laa [? Iku Laa] is the name, with its Lineage.

Class 3. Ihu Lani [? Iku Lani] is the name, with its Lineage.

Class 4. The Alii Laa is the name of that Class, the lowest Class, according to just what I think. Continue reading

Rufus Anderson, “Hawaiian Islands: Their Progress and Condition Under Missionary Labors,” 1865.

Anderson’s Writings About Hawaii nei.

(We are pleased to tell you, our dear readers, that we are taking the lines below from a Book written by our beloved friend, Anesona (Dr. Rufus Anderson) who travelled the width and breadth of our Islands. Our friend read greatly about Hawaii nei before coming here, and when he saw it for his own eyes, his heart was gladdened, and therefore, he wrote this Book of 450 pages, and we believe that you all will also join in the pleasure along with us, for what he wrote about his travels around Hawaii nei.

Because we are unable to print the Book in its entirety, therefore, we tried to translate some chapters into Hawaiian. And we are beginning to provide it for the public from Chapter VI of his Book.)

[This is the introduction to a translation of Rufus Anderson’s “Hawaiian Islands: Their Progress and Condition Under Missionary Labors” which appears as a serial in the Kuokoa from 1/19/1865 to 6/8/1865. The English is available on Google Books here. It is interesting that this serial describing travels through the archipelago is immediately followed by Kamakau’s serial on travels describing famous places, kupua, and ancient alii from Hawaii to Niihau.]

(Kuokoa, 1/19/1865, p. 1)

Ka Anesona Moolelo no Hawaii nei.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 3, Aoao 1. Ianuari 19, 1865.

On Kaumualii and Kaahumanu, 1880.

[From: “Ka Moolelo o Kaahumanu”]

Kaahumanu was one of them who made a circuit of Maui, Oahu, and Kauai with Liholiho. When Kaahumanu arrived on Kauai, she took Kaumualii, the alii of Kauai, as a kane [husband] for herself. When Liholiho returned to Oahu, it was with Haakulou, the woman of Kaumualii; because Liholiho took Haakulou as a wahine [wife] for himself, along with his other wahine.

Kaahumanu lived on Kauai along with Kaumualii in the year 1822. Perhaps in the month of August.

Kaahumanu wanted to seek out Nihoa. It was the very first time that Nihoa was found, that tiny island to the North-West of Niihau. Continue reading