Ka Lahui Hawaii newspaper begins, 1875.

THE NEWSPAPER KA LAHUI HAWAII.

This is a paper printed weekly for the Families and the Churches of Hawaii; it is something to assist with the proper living of families, with peace amongst people, and with the well being of the body and spirit of the Hawaiian People. “Envieth not, vaunteth not thyself, do not be easily provoked, thinketh no evil.” Continue reading

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On the passing Gabriel K. Keawehaku, Ka Anela o Mekiko, 1921.

GABRIEL K. KEAWEHAKU PASSES AWAY.

Gabriel K. Keawehaku.

After being ill for the past many months, Gabriel K. Keawehaku left this life at 9 a. m. on the 4th of this month, just outside of his home in Kaimuki, and in the afternoon of the following 5th, his remains were put to rest at the Kaimuki cemetery.

He was given birth to by his parents, Keawehaku (m) and Olaola (f), on the 31st of the month of May, 1867, here in Honolulu, and when he grew weary of this life, he was 54 years old, plus 7 months and 4 days.

He was educated in Honolulu nei during his childhood; he was a kamaaina of this town, performing many jobs, and it was the illness that came upon him that made him give up his different jobs.

He first was employed in his youth in the Metropolitan Meat Market of Waller [Wala] and company. During the monarchy, he lived with King Kalakaua, in the king’s private guards for six years. He served as the customs inspector when the government was transferred under America, being sent to Hilo, and he was customs inspector there for five years. Continue reading

On Kaumualii and Kaahumanu, 1880.

[From: “Ka Moolelo o Kaahumanu”]

Kaahumanu was one of them who made a circuit of Maui, Oahu, and Kauai with Liholiho. When Kaahumanu arrived on Kauai, she took Kaumualii, the alii of Kauai, as a kane [husband] for herself. When Liholiho returned to Oahu, it was with Haakulou, the woman of Kaumualii; because Liholiho took Haakulou as a wahine [wife] for himself, along with his other wahine.

Kaahumanu lived on Kauai along with Kaumualii in the year 1822. Perhaps in the month of August.

Kaahumanu wanted to seek out Nihoa. It was the very first time that Nihoa was found, that tiny island to the North-West of Niihau. Continue reading

Monument to Kauikeaouli on his 100th birthday, 1914.

UNVEILING OF THE DONATED TABLET

The Populace Gathers in Kawaiahao on the Evening of this Past Tuesday.

It was a scene from the sacred times when the Islands were ruled under monarchs, that was before a great crowd of people which arrived at Kawaiahao Church in the afternoon of this past Tuesday, when a memorial service for the hundredth birthday of King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III was held, and unveiled was the stone tablet dedicated to him that will be stood at the place of his birth at Keauhou, North Kona, Hawaii.

Before the hour set aside for that remembrance, at four o’clock in the afternoon, the crowd entered the church: from the members of the organizations of this town, the students of the Kamehameha Schools, the heads of the government, to the general public, filled up the church, with some people standing.

Outside of the church grounds was the Royal Hawaiian Band entertaining the people, with a majority of the people there, because they could not get a seat in the church.

Before the pulpit stood a painting of King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, and right below the painting was the tablet with clear lettering that said: “Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, ke keiki a Kamehameha III ame Keopuolani. Hanauia i Maraki 17,1814. Ka Moi lokomaikai.”

Continue reading

Short biography of Jane Loeau by her husband, S. L. Kaelemakule, 1873.

A History of Jane Loeau.

In the year 1847, Jane Loeau was boarding at the school of Mr. and Mrs. Cooke [Kuke], and she married John Robert Jasper [Keoki-pu], and he died. In the year 1855 perhaps, she married Marvin Seger [Sika] [? Martin Seger], and he died. In the year 1862, she married me. We were together for 10 years, 7 months, and 25 days in the covenant of marriage in peace and happiness. We did not leave one another, but it was the angel of heaven who has separated us, and I live with sadness and never-ending regret.

She is one of the royal descendants of Hawaii nei, born of alii “Papa.” From ancient times, her rank was of royalty, but she humbled herself, befriended and warmly welcomed newcomers, she was loving, and she was kind in actions and words, and she was a follower of the Lord. In the year 1865, she joined the church at West Hamakua, Hawaii, and this past July, the Rev. J. Bicknell [Bikanele] released our covenant at Kawaiahao Church, to Rev. H. H. Parker [Paleka] [? ua hookuu mai la o Rev. J. Bikanele i ko maua berita ma ka ekalesia o Kawaiahao, ia Rev. H. H. Paleka.]. “Blessed are those who die in the Lord.” I composed this loving chant [kanaenae] for her below:

Ke aoa lani ulu haoa o ke kapu,
Ke aoa lani o Haholua o Palena,
O ke Kihenelani nei a Kauhi—e,
Na Kauhikealani o Kama,
Oia no—a.

Ka Punua ula ku i ka moku,
I hoopunanaia iloko o ka lani,
O ka lani me he aka la i ka wai,
He akamai i ke kui lani,
Kuiia ae kani kui hono i ka moku,
Ka mai kaupoa ma ke kua,
I ku ka hene ma ka houpo,
Poaha ia hemo ka Haku,
Ma ka manawa o ka ua kapu,
O Holani nui kaipo,
Ma ka loko mai o Holani na ‘lii,
Oia no—a.

Hoopuka i Nuuanu ka ua a ka makani,
Haiki ka pili hau i Kahaukomo,
Komo i na kiowai a ke Kiowao,
Aleale i ke alo ua o Lanihuli,
Hala i ka na’ki o Konahuanui,
Nui ka ua, mahimahi nui ka makani,
Na hookoikoi a ka waahia,
He hilahila oe ke hai mai—e,
Iini ana loko,
Oia no—a.

O Hanalei ua pehu ka lani,
Pohu ka lani, loloa ka opua,
Opua lani uli ku hakakai,
Kai ka ua e—e ua i ka liko,
A ka liko awe loloa ka ua iluna,
Lele pulelo iluna o ka lau o ka laau,
Ukuhi i na pakeke wai o Neki,
Piha Hilo ke kaheka kulu a ka wai,
Wahiaia aku la Waioli e ka ua,
Naha Hanalei ke kahe nei ke one,
Oia ua e—e ua i Hanalei,
Oia no—a.

Hanalei lani kupilikii, kupilikii mau a ka lani,
Huikau ae la he hooilo, mahiki mai la ka lehua,
Ka lehua hale, ka lehua makanoe,
Ka naele i o ia e ka wai ka lepo,
O Hiku iluna o Maunahina,
Kupeke, kapekepeke iluna o Hauai’liki,
Iliki ka noe, anu ka nahele,
He nahele anu, me ua hoa’la i na lae ino o ka moe,
E poi ana a ku he ‘hu,
Moe aku ka luhi i Kauakanana—e,
E hoonana ae ana i ka moe—e,
O oni mai auanei ma ka hope,
Mahope mai—a,
Oia no—a.

(To be continued.)

S. L. Kaelemakule.

Honolulu, August 6, 1873.

[I am not sure if there is a continuation to this.

S. L. Kaelemakule doesn’t live that many years after that. He dies on March 3, 1878, at Kepahoni, Honolulu.]

(Ko Hawaii Ponoi, 8/13/1873, p. 4)

He Moolelo no Jane Loeau.

Ko Hawaii Ponoi, Buke I, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Augate 13, 1873.

Death announcement found outside of the Vital Statistics column, 1898.

THAT HAWAIIAN MOTHER HAS GONE.

It was a painful thing for our hearts to hear that the uncompassionate hand of death reached out and took the precious breath of life from the body of Mrs. Evalaina Willison [Wilson], the wife of Mr. C. B. Willison [Wilson], in the early morning of this Saturday, after she began to waste away of sickness for just a few short days.

She was a well-known woman here in town, and elsewhere on the island, and she was the attendant of Queen Liliuokalani while she was on the throne until her overthrow. There were many, many friends who visited to see her for the last time, and then dust returned to dust, for that is where it came from.

She leaves behind a husband, child and family who grieve for her from this side of the grave.

In the afternoon of this Sunday, the last services over the body were held at Kawaiahao Church by Rev. H. H. Parker, and from there the body was taken to its home in the ground at the cemetery of Kawaiahao, accompanied by the family and numerous friends, and next to her family who passed before she was put to rest for all times.

Ke Aloha Aina joins in the mourning with the family of the one who left on that road of no return, while asking the Almighty to lessen our grief.

(Aloha Aina, 5/28/1898, p. 5)

HALA IA MAKUAHINE HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 22, Aoao 5. Mei 28, 1898.

Two marriages, Chung Hoon/Akina & Koki/Kuaea, 1896.

Bound Together as One.

This past Thursday night, as we mentioned earlier, mauka of the residence of Rev. H. H. Parker, William H. Chung Hoon (Uilama Kanahana) and Miss Alo Akina of Kohala, Hawaii, were bound together by him (Parker). The husbandʻs neighborhood held a reception at Kauluwela, which was followed by a feast.

On that same night, after that marriage above, in the church of Kaumakapili, joined together by the Rev. H. H. Paker, was Solomona Davida Koki to Miss Esetera U. K. Kuaea. The couple arrived at 8, and it was performed immediately. There was much waiting until the church was filled with the crowd. The young girl is the organist of the church, and a student of W. Tela [W. Taylor? W. Tell?]. W. Tela played the organ while the marriage ceremony took place. There was a reception held after at the girlsʻ school of Kawaiahao, and a feast the day following at Waikahalulu. The couple boarded the Kinau of this Saturday morning to spend their first days of marriage in the land of the husband, at Waimea, Hawaii.

(Makaainana, 12/14/1896, p. 1)

Uoia a Lilo i Hookahi.

Ka Makaainana, Buke VI----Ano Hou, Helu 24, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 14, 1896.