150 years ago—The beginnings of the Kaahumanu Society, 1864.

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

I am V. K. Kaninaulani, along with A. Pauahi,¹ and L. Kamakaeha, are the Officers of this Association, of the Town of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Because of our desire to announce this fine endeavor amongst ourselves and the people, we come together to undertake these tasks.

CONSTITUTION.

Clause I. This Association was established at Kawaiahao, Honolulu, on this day the 8th of August, 1864. This Association is officially called, “Ahahui Kaahumanu.”

Clause II. The Officers of this Association are the President, the Vice President, the Secretary, the Vice Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause III. This Association was established to assist each other member of this Association when they are in need (in sickness, poverty, and death)

Clause IV. The yearly meeting of this Association will be on the second Monday of August of each year, and a yearly Banquet will be held on the last day of August every year in Honolulu nei, at the location designated.

Clause V. The Association will supply Record Books [Buke Oihana] of the Association, as well as any other expenses for the President, Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause VI. The President will select Executive Committees for this Association, and they will prepare lists of names of those who want to present themselves before the Association.

Clause VII. Should a member of this Association die, then the President or if not the President, then a representative will order by Executive Committee to gather in mourning attire at the place of the deceased for the funeral over her body.

Clause VIII. The President of this Association is empowered to establish other Associations on the other islands of this Nation.

Clause IX. The Association shall resolve all problems and difficulties brought before it from other lands.

Clause X. The Treasurer may expend all funds at her disposal with the approval of the President.

Clause XI. Members of this Association shall pay a dollar and a half ($1.50) yearly, or installments of an eighth ($0.12.1-2) every month; it is not prohibited to give more.

Clause XII. Clauses of this Constitution may be changed after one year.

¹Pauahi is often referred to as A. Pauahi. [Would there be anyone who knows what that initial stands for?]

(Kuokoa, 8/20/1864, p. 4)

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 34, Aoao 4. Augate 20, 1864.

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Keolaokalani Paki Bishop, 1863.

There was a Baptism at the Residence of the Honorable C. R. Bishop, “Haleakala;” baptized was the child of the honorable R. Keelikolani and J. Y. Davis, and he was called, “Keolaokalani Paki Bihopa.”

The Honorable C. R. Bishop and Pauahi (the wife of Bishop) were those who bestowed the name, and Rev. C. Corwin is the one who performed the baptism.

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 2/12/1863, p. 2)

"He Babetizo ma ka Hale..."

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika, Buke 2, Helu 18, Aoao 2. Feberuari 12, 1863.

Liliuokalani plays the first organ at Kawaiahao Church, 1867.

First Playing of the Organ of Kawaiahao Church.

At 10 in the morning of the 25th of December, the great musical instrument of Kawaiahao was played before the great crowd who gathered there to hear it being played for the first time. A great assortment of people came to hear and to see for themselves.

The Organ was played by the Princess, the Honorable Mrs. Lilia Kamakaeha Dominis, the royal leader of the Kawaiahao choir, and she was honored by her royal younger sister, Likelike, as well as the Honorable Mrs. Pauahi Bishop, who sat in the choir.

A song of gratitude was sung while the two pastors walked up to the pulpit, they being the Rev. E. Kekoa and the Kahu of the Church. The name of the hymn was “No Iehova ka Honua.”

After the singing of the hymn, nicely and fearlessly by the royal one who performed it, albeit this was the first time she played the organ before a crowd; then Rev. E. Kekoa stood and explained briefly the fulfilling of the dream of the Kawaiahao Choir, the church members, and the public, who helped with their 25¢ and their 12½¢ so that we could have this Great Instrument which is being played.

At the closing of this speech above, the Kahu of Kawaiahao stood and explained to all the birth of the King of kings, and the Lord of lords in the city of David, and expanded on things related to the birth of that Prince of Life.

At the conclusion of his speech, a hymn was given, and that alii lept into action, like she was very accustomed to it; and we are greatly appreciative for her advancement in musical instruments; and this was followed by a prayer, and then the congregation was released. The 7 foreign language speaking haole [?] gifted to Rev. H. H. Parker, $100.00 after the end of the prayer.

PRESENTING OF A GIFT.

After the congregation was let go, the Kawaiahao Choir went up to the Residence of their royal leader, to Washington Place, with a gift they wanted to present to her, a medal [?] bracelet with words engraved upon it, thusly:

“A GIFT
AN EXPRESSION OF ALOHA
BY
The Kawaiahao Choir
TO
MRS. LIDIA K. DOMINIS.”

which was [….] by W. Ka, and it was placed on the right hand of that royal one with the words below [….] by A. H[…..].

O Princess:
The Honorable
Mrs. Lilia K. Dominis.

Aloha oe:—We are your servants, the members of the Kawaiahao Choir, we show our aloha for you by presenting you with this gift of a small part of a Medal [?]; but it is not with thoughts of your servants, that their giving you this gift is something that should give you more honor, or that perhaps it will increase your already beautiful nature, but as a true expression of the things below:

One. We, your servants, the members of the Kawaiahao Choir, show our deep aloha to our Princess, and our Leader, with this small gift, as a symbol for your leaving your true Alii status [?]

Two. Your servants, the members of the Kawaiahao Choir, constantly think of your everlasting patience as you face the heavy rains of the winter, the scorching sun of the summer, the pitch dark nights of Town, and the bright moonlit nights, as you lead us in our Hymns.

And for these reasons, we ask of you, should your servants have the aloha of our Princess, the Honorable Mrs. Lilia K. Dominis, then let the Army of the wide Heavens watch over you. With aloha.

The Kawaiahao Choir.

Honolulu, Dec. 25, 1867.

—————

The Princess Replied Like This:

“I am joyful at your combined thought in gifting me with this present; it is a symbol of your true love for me.”

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1867, p. 3)

Ka Hookani mua ana o ka Ogana o ka Halepule o Kawaiahao.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 52, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 28, 1867.