Henry Grube Marchant, 1893.

Henry Grube is heading back to the land of his birth. He was sent to increase his knowledge in engraving. And it seems that next month, October, is when it is believed that he will return home.

[Henry Grube Marchant was one of the youths sent abroad to Boston to learn engraving as part of King Kalakaua’s Education of Hawaiian Youths in Foreign Countries.]

(Lei Momi, 8/28/1893, p. 3)

Ka Lei Momi, Buke I, Helu 4, Aoao 3. Augate 28, 1893.

Where is this portrait? 1881—2022

Found in a Japanese newspaper: “Mr. Shoji Masayoshi of Tokyo, a famous oil painter, is painting a portrait of the Alii, the King of Hawaii, looking just like the King when he wore Japanese royal attire at a banquet given in his honor at Momijikwan,* one of the palaces. It is said that this artist will gift this painting of their beloved King to the Nation of Hawaii.

[Does anyone know who this artist is and what happened to the painting?]

*Kōyōkan

(Elele Poakolu, 8/10/1881, p. 5)

Ka Elele Poakolu, Buke II, Helu 23, Aoao 5.

Lava Drawings by Nawahi and John L. Reese, 1881.

[Found under: “KELA ME KEIA.”]

There are two Lava drawings in the window of Whitney and Robinson, drawn by Hon. Joseph Nawahi, at Hilo, and the other was drawn here in Honolulu by the caricaturist, J. L. Reese (Keoni Liki). It is said that these are very beautiful; and we hope these experts will continue with this work.

(Elele Poakolu, 7/13/1881, p. 1)

Ka Elele Poakolu, Buke II, Helu 19, Aoao 1. Iulai 13, 1881.

Hawaiian Artist, 1873.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

Hawaiian Artist.—Our famous artist of the Kanilehua rain sent a superb picture of a day of surfing in Hilo before the King [Lunalilo] while he was there. A gentleman who saw the painting remarked that it was indeed how the day of surfing was. Praise for our Hawaiian artist. If there was a copper plate engraver here, we would be able to print it in the newspaper.

[This must be talking about Joseph Nawahi. Does anyone know of this painting of surfing in Hilo?!]

(Kuokoa, 3/22/1873, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XII, Helu 12, Aoao 2. Maraki 22, 1873.

Kalaipahoa, and “Hawaiian Art,” 1941.

HAWAII’S WOODEN GODS GOOD POLYNESIAN ART

Huc M. Luquiens Appreciates Carved and Feathered Deities of Ferocious Mien and Lost Symbolism

By LORIN TARR GILL

“If we were forced to choose a single specimen to represent the characteristic art of Polynesia, it might well be one of the extraordinary wooden gods of Hawaii,” Huc Luquiens, assistant professor of art at the University of Hawaii, asserts in his paper on “Hawaiian Art,” soon to be published by the Bishop museum. Continue reading

Kamehameha Girls’ School Art Week, 1941.

Art Week Celebrated

FINISHING TOUCHES—Amelia Kaopua, president of the Kamehameha School for Girls’ student body, yesterday put finishing touches on her landscape preparatory to its entry in the Art Week show. Art Week began yesterday and will continue through Friday under the direction of Miss Evelyn Erickson, art instructor. (Advertiser Photo). Continue reading

Hawaii artists, 1901.

Works Painted by Our People.

Some of These Paintings Shown Last Monday.

In their Exhibition Room in Progress Hall, on the corner of Fort and Beretania Streets, our artists showed some of the paintings they created with patience. Hawaii is one of the best places for artists because the land is beautiful, the mountains are beautiful, the plants are beautiful, everywhere is beautiful, and they always have a subject to paint at any time. When observing the paintings shown at their exhibition room, those paintings show that our men and women artists know the beauty of the land and they used their brushes to situate this beauty upon the paper or canvas painted by them. Continue reading

Hannah Baker in Hilo starting Hawaiian quilting clubs, 1941.

A FINE THING FOR HAWAIIAN MOTHERS

Here in Hilo is Mrs. Hannah Baker now, and she established some Hawaiian Quilting Associations. The first of her Associations was established at the YWCA Building and the second in Keaukaha.

From what was said, there are many who joined these clubs because they were interested in how to quilt Hawaiian blankets, and others perhaps because they wanted to obtain the knowledge of how to cut patterns of all sorts. Continue reading