Thomas’ Square, 1864.

[Found under: “NOTES OF THE WEEK.”]

A Public Park—Nothing is more needed here in Honolulu than a public park, and if we are ever to have one, now is the time to make a move and secure the land. Years ago, there was some talk about a Park on the plains, to be called “Thomas’ Square.” Continue reading

Punchbowl replanted, 1876.

Twenty Minutes atop Puowina.—In the deep dark morning of this past Wednesday, we climbed atop Puowina to gaze upon the efforts of the King, which was joined in by the Chiefs and the makaainana to grow trees with the royal ones. The fence surrounding the plants are still secure but of the maybe four hundred or more trees that were planted, it appears only about a hundred or more trees are growing. Most of them are dead. The weeds that were cut down before the planting are growing as well, and the area where the planted trees are growing is on the Ewa side. The two reservoirs have gone dry, and the reservoir on the Waikiki side is from the rain. There are some clumps of sugarcane and banana plants growing, and if their fruit ripens, they will be savored. Outside of the fence, the wild cattle are grazing on the grass. We climbed up amongst the plantings for twenty minutes, and that was sufficient.

(Kuokoa, 1/1/1876, p. 2)

Iwakalua Minute Maluna o Puowina.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XV, Helu 1, Aoao 2. Ianuari 1, 1876.

More on the transfer of the remains of the Alii to Maunaala, 1865.

Just as we announced in last week’s issue of our paper, that there would be a funeral for the Minister of Foreign Affairs [Kuhina o ko na Aina e], it was indeed carried out. After the night prayer [pule poeleele] of the Anglican Church [Halepule Hoomana Enelani] was over, the body of R. C. Wyllie was taken from his residence at Nuuanu to the Church at Peleula, where it was left until the funeral procession to his permanent home, that being on a following day.

When the sun reached its heights, the military boys were seen crowded together in the grounds of the Palace. The Cavalry [Puali Koa Kaua Lio] under Captain C. H. Judd, the Artillery Division [? Koa Pukaa] under Captain J. H. Brown, the regular soldiers [? Koa ku mau] under Captain Kahoohuli, the Hulumanu Division [Koa Hulumanu] under Captain J. M. Kapena, the Rifle Squad [Koa Raifela] under Captain Hassinger. From the Palace, they moved on to the Church, and there many people of all sorts who waited with great hope that they would take part in the procession taking him to be left in peace where we all must go with no delay when fetched by the heartless ruler of the pit.

After the prayer for him was over, a procession was organized by the Marshall for the day, John O. Dominis, and the procession marched quietly to the Royal Cemetery at Maunaala. Most of the businesses were closed that day, and everyone went to watch the funeral procession; the sides of the streets were filled with men, women, and children. When the remains entered the Cemetery, and right after, the troops and the artillery division sounded their guns for him. However before his funeral, the Fort at Puowaina shot off minute guns until he was at the Cemetery.

It was as if while the group of onlookers watched him being taken away, all of the people were were reeling with painful sorrow in their hearts. Who would not be without aloha, for he lived until well known in the calm of Hauola, and should he have had a partner, he would have had many grandchildren, but he lived alone and did not multiply in the uplands of Kawananakoa. He has gone, but has left a Monument for himself, not in the city, or on the side of the streets of our town, but on the sides of the history of our Nation, and in the hearts of this generation, and all of the generations to come. When he entered the Tomb, the crowd scattered and went back with a heavy heart.

After the sun returned to the surface of the sea, another funeral was readied, and that funeral to move to a new place our

Alii’s Remains,

and here are their names below, as is written on their coffins:

(1) Jane Lahilahi Kaeo, Died Jan 12, 1862, Aged 50 years.

(2) T. C. Byde Rooke, F. R. C. S. Born May 18, 1806, Died May 28, 1858.

(3) Keoni Ana, Born on the 12th of March, 1810, Died July 18, 1857.

(4) B. Namakeha, Died 27 Dec. 1860, At 52 years of age.

(5) John William Pitt Kinau, Born Dec. 27, 1842, Died on the 9th of Sept. 1857.

(6) Elisabeta Kaahumanu, Born 1793, Died 1842.

(7) Kamehameha 2d, Elii no nahina o Awhai, Make i Pelekani 28 Makaiki Kaiku, I ke mahoe mua o Kamakaiki 1824, Aloha ino no komako Elii Iolani.
Kamehameha 2nd King of the Sandwich Islands, Died July 14th, 1824, In London, in the 28th year of his age, May we remember our beloved King Iolani.

(8) Kamehamalu Elii no na aina o awahi, Make i Pelekani, 22 ma Raiki Teitu, London 8 Re mahoe o Re ma Raiki 1824.
Tamehamalu, Queen of the Sandwich Islands, Departed this life in London on the 8 July 1824, Aged 22 years.

(9) Kaahumanu II died Apr. 4, 1839 in Her 33rd Year.

(10) In this casket is the daughter [? son] of Kamehameha III, Keaweaweulaokalani; there is nothing inscribed on the casket.

(11) Kamehameha III, born on the 17th of March 1813, Died 15th December 1854, He reigned for 29 years.

(12) His Highness, Albert Edward Kauikeaouli, Leiopapa a Kamehameha, Haku o Hawaii, Born on the 27th of May, 1858, died on the 27th of August, 1862. Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not, for of such is the Kingdom of God.

(13) Alexander Kalanikua Liholiho, Iolani Maka o Iouli Kunuiakea, Kukailimoku, Kamehameha IV, King of the Hawaiian Islands. Born Feberuary 9, 1834, succeeded to the Throne, December 15, 1854. Died November 30, 1863.

(14) Mose Kekuaiwa, Born July 20, 1829, Died November 29, 1848.

(15) Davida Tamehameha, Born on May 20, 1828, Died December 15, 1835. He was 7 years, 6 months, and 16 days old.

(16) Leleiohoku, Born March 21, 1821, Died October 21, 1848.

(17) A. Paki, Born Aug. 1808, Died June 13th, 1855.

(18) L. Konia, Wife of A. Paki, Born 1808, Died July 2nd, 1857.

(19) Keolaokalani Paki Bishop, Born Dec. 30, 1862, Died Aug. 29, 1863.

(20) Kamanele, Died May 7, 1831, at 19 Years of Age.

(21) Liloa and Lonoikamakahiki.

When the stifling rays of the sun left, and when the dim moon shown over the peaceful town, the torches glowed red, lighting up the bones of the Alii as they were carried on palanquins [manele], to lie and be placed in the new building made with fine craftsmanship for their physical remains, for they returned to the eternal home of this life, death snatching without compassion, and dragged them off without a cry [?? ke ka-ua aku] being heard.

Death, according to one poet, is something terribly frightening. This is true; we understand that death is something very awesome, because it is not known where it will come, from the lowly hovel to perhaps at the door of the Palace.

“Ka ilihune, ka poe waiwai,
Ka poe kiekie, a me ka poe haahaa,
Na ka make e hoiliwai like ia lakou.”

[“The poor, the rich,
The high, and the low,
Death makes them all equal.”]

Death is something regular, everyday we hear the ringing of the funerary bells, and we always are witness to the funerary processions cloaked in mourning clothes, following after their friends to his resting place—the grave. As these people are taken away, we look—and each of them go to our occupations in this life; some look for their fortune, while other for fame, and glory. But when are Alii are taken away, trapped by the tireless hands of death, we all unassumingly consider, looking back upon the history of his life, and weigh.

“Ina ua kupono ia no ka lani i ka lani,
Ina aole ia i kupono nolaila, i Gehena.”

[“If befitting for heaven, then to heaven,
If not befitting for there, then to hell.”]

[See more on the Nanea Armstrong-Wassel’s instagram post here.]

(Au Okoa, 11/6/1865, p. 2)

E like me ka makou mea i hoolaha aku ai...

Ke Au Okoa, Buke I, Helu 29, Aoao 2. Novemaba 6, 1865.

Admiral Richard Thomas honored once again, 1857.

BY AUTHORITY.

By order of the King, the Chief [Kamehameha IV], it is hereby proclaimed that in order to show the aloha of his Nation at the passing of Admiral Richard Thomas, the one who returned the islands of Hawaii and the Hawaiian Flag on the 31st of July, 1843 to the King recently deceased, seventeen minute guns [pu minuke] will be fired from Puowaina [the fort at Punchbowl] at 12 o’clock on this day, and the Alii will go into mourning and all of the officers of the King’s government shall wear black crepe [hoailona kanikau] on their left arm for fifteen days.

M. KEKUANAOA, Chief Chamberlain [Haku Puuku],

Office of the Chamberlain [Oihana Puuku], 12th of Dec., 1857.

(Hae Hawaii, 12/16/1857, p. 150.)

NA KE AUPUNI.

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 2, Ano Hou.—Helu 38, Aoao 150. Dekemaba 16, 1857.

Board of Health and leprosy, 1906.

A HAWAIIAN WOMAN HIDDEN AWAY.

After the Board of Health [Papa Ola] searched for ten months, they found Mrs. Flora K. Crowell, a Hawaiian woman, and she was taken and detained mauka of the Kalihi Hospital. It is not clear why the Board of Health chased after that woman, but there is something astonishing and unclear about what was done to this woman.

After Mrs. Flora K. Crowell was found by the officers of the Board of Health, she said she was locked away like a prisoner.

This wahine is the birth daughter of Mrs. Hattie Hiram who died on the 5th of November 1905, and she married Clement C. Crowell in the year 1900, and by this marriage the two of them had a daughter; but just six months after they had the girl, she [Flora Crowell] was suspected of having leprosy and taken away to be held at the Kalihi Hospital.

According to the wishes of her mother [Hattie Hiram], she was sent to Japan to be treated along with others who were suspected of having the illness. Being that she did not have the funds to be treated and per her wishes, she came back to Honolulu nei after nine months of being away from here.

When she arrived in Honolulu, she went to live with her mother on Beritania Street, and she was hidden there until the death of her mother. There was no one who knew she was here in Honolulu at the time, except her mother along with another woman named Keluia and George Kaia. However, when her mother was extremely ill, Solomon Hiram came, and because they were speaking so loudly, he showed himself before them; S. Hiram was shocked at seeing her; and it was then that she was subdued by S. Hiram along with George Kaia and Keluia and detained in a building on the grounds, and she was locked inside.

A few days later, while her mother was still alive, she [Flora Crowell] was taken to the place of George Kaia on Young Street, and from there she was then taken to the uplands of Kalihi Valley to live, and from there she was taken to a grass house atop Puowaina, on the road that goes up to Puuohia (Tantalus). She escaped from this place and returned to live at her own home on Beritania Street, and it was there she lived unbeknownst to others, all except an old man who brought her food.

But during her last two days there, that man did not come back, and she almost starved for lack of food; it was only because of the passing by of one of her friends from her youth, that she was brought to that friend’s home on Young Street. This was the daughter of John Kamaki, the one who gave Flora Crowell money to care for herself while in Japan.

At the death of Mrs. Hattie Hiram, John Kamaki came and took care of her funeral, and saw for the first time that here was Mrs. Clement in Honolulu nei. Her baby was being cared for by John Kamaki, who took her after the death of Mrs. H. Hiram.

When Solomon Hiram just left with the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii], he left instructions for some people to keep good watch over Mrs. Clement.

She is now living with her friends mauka of Pauoa, and she has chosen R. W. Breckons as the executor of her estate.

There is no doubt, the quick death of her mother and her being hidden away, will be investigated immediately by the grand jury of this session.

(Kuokoa, 11/2/1906, p. 8)

HE WAHINE HAWAII I HUNA MA-LUIA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 44, Aoao 8. Novemaba 2, 1906.

Pond atop Punchbowl? 1902.

Mysterious Pond.

An amazing pond was found atop Puowaina by  some people who visited there; they found this amazing waters among lantana plants. Close to this pond was planted a patch of sweet potatoes by an old Hawaiian man; he did not know of this new thing until he was weeding near the pond. While he was working [hono ana ?], to his surprise, he saw this pond their. When he looked at it, its mouth was five feet long, and so too of the depth. The water is five feet or more then you reach black sand. According to what some people say, this is magical waters. It is said to be kupua water, like what is common among amazing things, but there is no trace of the story of this water. It is truly a mysterious spring. The water in the pond these days has somewhat receded.

(Kuokoa, 6/27/1902, p. 5)

Luawai Hoopahaohao.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XL, Helu 26, Aoao 5, Iune 27, 1902.

The above image was taken directly from the microfilm. Here for comparison is the same article as it appears online:

Luawai Hoopahaohao.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XL, Helu 26, Aoao 5. Iune 27, 1902.

Another flag story, 1893.

THE AMERICAN FLAG.

On this Saturday morning, an American Flag was seen above Puowaina fluttering proudly, and the pole upon which it was placed was that piece of metal of the Government Surveyors.

When people saw this astonishing thing, there were many questions, but no answers.

When the day progressed to 9 o’clock or more, it was seen now that the American Flag wasn’t there, and half an hour later, Samuela K. Kaloa arrived with that flag and said that this was the Flag that was up at Puowaina, and it was I who went and took it down.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 4/18/1893, p. 3)

KA HAE AMERIKA.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 686, Aoao 3. Aperila 18, 1893.