The U. S. S. Boston, John L. Stevens, and the Hawaiian flag, 1893.

PROTECTORATE.

At nine o’clock this morning, and since the editorial matter of The Liberal was in type, the United States flag was hoisted upon the Capitol by Captain Wiltse of the U. S. S. Boston and a United States Protectorate was proclaimed over the Hawaiian Islands in the name of the American Government, pending negotiations now going on at Washington. The troops saluted the American flag first and immediately thereafter faced about and saluted the Hawaiian flag. The following is the text of the proclamation:

TO THE HAWAIIAN PEOPLE.

At the request of the Provisional Government of the Hawaiian Islands, I hereby, in the name of the United States of America, assume the protection of the Hawaiian Islands for the protection of life and property, and occupation of the public buildings and Hawaiian soil, so far as may be necessary for the purpose of specified, but not interfering with the administration of public affairs by the Provisional Government.

This action is taken pending, and subject to, negotiations at Washington.

John L. Stevens,

Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States.

United States Legation, February 1, 1893.

Approved and executed by

G. C. Wiltse, Captain U. S. N.

Commanding the United States Ship “Boston.”

(Liberal, 2/1/1893, p. 2)

PROTECTORATE.

The Liberal, Volume I, Number 41, Page 2. February 1, 1893.

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More on the Hawaiian flag and the Republic, 1894.

FICKLE ACTION.

When the Iwalani docked, we received a letter with the news from Kauai, “the land where the sun is snatched” [ka moku kaili la], and this is the news. On this past Fourth of July, the holiday of the true Americans to celebrate the glory of the Independence of that Great Republic of the world.

W. H. Rice put up two flags on his flagpole, the American Flag on top, and the Hawaiian Flag below; and so too did G. N. Wilcox. But the amazing thing is that on the grounds of the “Peacock Government” [Aupuni Pikake] is established, such action was not seen; this kind of thing is just so hilarious.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 7/11/1894, p. 2)

HO'E HA'A NA HANA.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 980, Aoao 2. Iulai 11, 1894.

One year since the Republic transferred power to the United States, 1899.

THE 12th OF AUGUST.

This is the Day that made a year since the day that the Hawaiian Flag was taken down and the American Flag was raised on the flag pole of Iolani Palace.

The hurt down in our guts [naau] is unimaginable when remembering this; for there is no Hawaiian that can say that his naau is happy with what was done. Because if we are not mistaken, branded withing the hearts of Hawaiians is the love and pride for his Beloved Flag. The flag which holds memories of many years spreading its wings in peace over the cheeks of Hawaii nei. And for which none of us can say that we were robbed and saddened under its protection. Not at all! Our hearts will only cherish for all times, the loving memories and peace; and as such, are not each and every Kanaka Hawaii burning with aloha for it?

The falling of the Hawaiian Flag from where it proudly fluttered on the tips of the warm breezes of Hawaii nei, is like the death of origin and foundation of this people [lahuikanaka]; and it is clear that the branches and leaves of this tree (The Hawaiian Nation) will wither and fade, a tree that was greatly admired by other nations for its lush and verdant growth. What was called the “Paradise of the Pacific [Paredaiso o ka Pakipika].”

Therefore, where is it today? It has gone, and died; and it is but the wisps that are budding, without a parent to feed its nourishing waters. For the trunk has been chopped.

Because of this heart-wrenching thing, the Lahui Hawaii invites all of you, native Hawaiians. From this day forward, to discard your living indifferently, lazily, wastefully, off others, and all of your childish ways; and for each and everyone of you to stand and fight against the obstructions in this world with patience, caution, independence, and righteousness; and it is through this that Hawaii nei will once again regain its success and pride. Now is the time, and it is only now that we can do the mending while this striped cloth has not become too ragged. (Inoa Lahui.)

(Lahui Hawaii, 8/12/1899, p. 4)

KA LA 12 O AUGATE.

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 29, Aoao 4. Augate 12, 1899.

Another flag story, 1893.

THE AMERICAN FLAG.

On this Saturday morning, an American Flag was seen above Puowaina fluttering proudly, and the pole upon which it was placed was that piece of metal of the Government Surveyors.

When people saw this astonishing thing, there were many questions, but no answers.

When the day progressed to 9 o’clock or more, it was seen now that the American Flag wasn’t there, and half an hour later, Samuela K. Kaloa arrived with that flag and said that this was the Flag that was up at Puowaina, and it was I who went and took it down.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 4/18/1893, p. 3)

KA HAE AMERIKA.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 686, Aoao 3. Aperila 18, 1893.

More on the flag, 1893.

[Found under: “News of the Day”]

According to the last news we received, there is a desire to raise the American flag above the Palace, and the government buildings, and up the other flag poles of the nation, however, there are some high-ranking officials from other nations who are protesting it vehemently; and that is how they barely remain.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 1/19/1893, p. 2)

Ma ka lono i loaa hope...

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 625, Aoao 2. Ianuari 19, 1893.

Film of Kalaupapa 4th of July celebration, 1915.

FILM OF MOLOKAI SHOWN.

Before a few invited people, the haole film maker, R. K. Bonine showed views of the celebration of the fourth of July at the land of the patients on Molokai, on the night of this past July 4th.

Superintendent McVeigh was amongst the audience, and was much appreciative of the quality and clarity of these views shot on film; and when he returned to the land of the patients this Tuesday, he took with him the movie to show before the patients.

The movie taken by Mr. Bonine was 800 feet in length, and as he agreed before the patients of Kalaupapa to show the movie he shot before them, therefore, he wanted Molokai’s people to see that movie first before him showing it to Honolulu’s people at the Opera House in the future.

The first scene in the movie is the port of Kalaupapa, with the skiffs of the steamship approaching the harbor; accompanying this first scene is the store of Kalaupapa, with a oxcart pulled by four oxen—this scene shows everyday life at the land of the patients.

The scene following this is the infirmary, which is far away, and some other things; and then it moves to the celebration of this past fourth of July.

In the parade are five police, all the way at the head of the parade, with their uniforms; following behind them are the automobiles and the Chinese carts [kaa bake?], and American flags wave everywhere like the ones decorating those vehicles.

After the parading cars were those pa-u riders with their skirts fluttering in the wind; and after them were the various singing groups all dressed up in their uniforms, the girls of Bishop Home, the boys of Baldwin Home; and following that was the cowboys and the pa-u riders of Kauai.

The entertaining horse races of the day is another good scene, along with some other views of the land of the patients; and when that small crowd saw these scenes, they were full of appreciation for Mr. Bonine, and the patients will certainly not fail to give their thanks for the movie.

(Kuokoa, 8/15/1915, p. 3)

HOIKEIKE IA NA KIIONIONI O MOLOKAI.

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 33, Aoao 3. Augate 13, 1915.