Might this be the reason the song “Palisa” was written? 1908.

SELECTED FILMS FOR THE SETTLEMENT

Messrs. C. G. Bockus, Gerrit Wilder and C. S. Crane, the committee named to select and purchase moving-picture film for the machine shortly to be taken to the Molokai Settlement, watched R. K. Bonine exhibit a mile or so of views and stunts submitted to them for sale. Mr. Bonine had put his machine and his skill at the service of the committee, and the tests of the various films were made in his studio. There were several persons to watch in addition to the committeemen, including Superintendent Jack McVeigh of the Settlement and A. Gartley, and the various pictures were criticized as to their particular merits for the desired use. Continue reading

Advertisements

Bonine brings movies to Kalawao and Kalaupapa, 1909.

FIRST MOVING PICTURE SHOW TAKES SETTLEMENT BY STORM

On Thursday evening last a new miracle happened at Kalaupapa. On that evening R. K. Bonine, the moving-picture expert, threw his first picture on the screen before an audience of a thousand lepers, and there was a great gasp of awed astonishment and keen delight when the pictures really moved and did things. Cheers, tears, gasps and soul-satisfying laughter greeted the pictures in turn, and when the reels put aside for the first entertainment had been exhausted, the people of Kalaupapa and Kalawao, in a body, cheered their thanks to the man who had brought these wonders to them and to those in Honolulu who had through their contributions made these miracles possible.

It was a great day for the people of the Molokai Settlement, and it was a great day for Bonine. To the lepers had come a new marvel, greater far than the sight of the mighty White Fleet, which maneuvered past their shores last summer, greater than anything that had come to them. No place the world over have motion pictures made such a hit. Continue reading

“Early movies of Hawaii” follow up, 2012.

Mahalo to Connie Woyciesjes and Uluulu for their responses pertaining to the scenes shot by the “man famous for filming movies”!

Perhaps this was R. K. Bonine as Connie suggests, but i am not sure why he’d be arriving on the Wilhelmina, i assumed he was already here in Hawaii at that time. There are by the way many articles about Bonine taking movies. Here is one which i previously posted from 1915.

From Uluulu, there was the suggestion that maybe the reels labeled “Picturesque Hawaii ca. 1916” at Critical Past are the scenes in question. Look for instance at this short movie put out by the Ford Motor Company dealing with the pineapple and labeled 1916, (which was described in the article).

Film of Kalaupapa 4th of July celebration, 1915.

FILM OF MOLOKAI SHOWN.

Before a few invited people, the haole film maker, R. K. Bonine showed views of the celebration of the fourth of July at the land of the patients on Molokai, on the night of this past July 4th.

Superintendent McVeigh was amongst the audience, and was much appreciative of the quality and clarity of these views shot on film; and when he returned to the land of the patients this Tuesday, he took with him the movie to show before the patients.

The movie taken by Mr. Bonine was 800 feet in length, and as he agreed before the patients of Kalaupapa to show the movie he shot before them, therefore, he wanted Molokai’s people to see that movie first before him showing it to Honolulu’s people at the Opera House in the future.

The first scene in the movie is the port of Kalaupapa, with the skiffs of the steamship approaching the harbor; accompanying this first scene is the store of Kalaupapa, with a oxcart pulled by four oxen—this scene shows everyday life at the land of the patients.

The scene following this is the infirmary, which is far away, and some other things; and then it moves to the celebration of this past fourth of July.

In the parade are five police, all the way at the head of the parade, with their uniforms; following behind them are the automobiles and the Chinese carts [kaa bake?], and American flags wave everywhere like the ones decorating those vehicles.

After the parading cars were those pa-u riders with their skirts fluttering in the wind; and after them were the various singing groups all dressed up in their uniforms, the girls of Bishop Home, the boys of Baldwin Home; and following that was the cowboys and the pa-u riders of Kauai.

The entertaining horse races of the day is another good scene, along with some other views of the land of the patients; and when that small crowd saw these scenes, they were full of appreciation for Mr. Bonine, and the patients will certainly not fail to give their thanks for the movie.

(Kuokoa, 8/15/1915, p. 3)

HOIKEIKE IA NA KIIONIONI O MOLOKAI.

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 33, Aoao 3. Augate 13, 1915.