Lanai to be sold, 1917.

[Found under: “NA NUHOU KULOKO.”]

Lanai i being purchased for $600,000,000, to carry out the Planting Pineapple Business there. It has been confirmed that there is about 6,000 to 10,000 acres suitable for planting the fruit.

(Puuhonua o na Hawaii, 1/19/1917, p. 4)

E kuai ia aku ana o Lanai...

Ka Puuhonua o na Hawaii, Buke IV, Helu 3, Aoao 4. Ianuari 19, 1917.

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Pineapple at the expo in Seattle, 1909.

HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE IS HIGHLY DESIRED AT THE EXPOSITION.

There is much desire for hala kahiki from Hawaii at the exposition being held in Seattle, because on the ship that just left Honolulu for San Francisco, five-hundred boxes of pineapple is being sent to be sold at the show grounds.

One hundred pineapples are being sold on the average each day, but it is believed that not everyone visiting has tasted the pineapple from Hawaii; and if they receive those added boxes of pineapple, it will supply the visitors for a good amount of time.

This great taking to of the pineapples from Hawaii at Seattle has become something for the pineapple planters to rejoice about, because they feel that that is the one place where people from all over the world can see the quality and the affordability of the pineapples of Hawaii which is foremost above the pineapples of other places.

From now on, the pineapple planters will prepare for orders, and they are able to supply large amounts of pineapples that will be desired.

(Kuokoa, 6/25/1909, p. 5)

MAKEMAKE NUIIA KA HALA HAWAII MA KAHI HOIKEIKE.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVI, Helu 26, Aoao 5. Iune 25, 1909.

Pineapples in Wahiawa, 1920.

Truth About the Hawaiian Pineapple Company

The Hawaiian Pineapple Company always upholds good relations amongst its employees, supervisors, and heads, and we believe we always have the full backing of our employees, and if that weren’t the case, gaining the progress we have today would be incomprehensible.

The farming of pineapples in Wahiawa is on about 10,000 acres of land, and we believe that it is producing, with the aid of the steadfast workers and machinery of the newest model, the finest pineapple of the world.

Canned at the pineapple plant in Honolulu, in a single day from 1919 on, more than 650,000 cans of pineapple. This is due to the modern processes and new machinery, along with the skilled and careful workers.

JAMES D. DOLE,

President of the Hawaiian Pineapple Company.

(This is the third advertisement.)

(Kuokoa, 6/25/1920, p. 4)

Na Mea Oiaio Pili i ka Hui Halakahiki Hawaii

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVIII, Helu 25, Aoao 4. Iune 25, 1920.

“Early movies of Hawaii” follow up, 2012.

Mahalo to Connie Woyciesjes and Uluulu for their responses pertaining to the scenes shot by the “man famous for filming movies”!

Perhaps this was R. K. Bonine as Connie suggests, but i am not sure why he’d be arriving on the Wilhelmina, i assumed he was already here in Hawaii at that time. There are by the way many articles about Bonine taking movies. Here is one which i previously posted from 1915.

From Uluulu, there was the suggestion that maybe the reels labeled “Picturesque Hawaii ca. 1916” at Critical Past are the scenes in question. Look for instance at this short movie put out by the Ford Motor Company dealing with the pineapple and labeled 1916, (which was described in the article).

Hawaiian Pine purchases Lanai, 1922.

LANAI GOES TO THE HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE COMPANY

Last Tuesday the deal went through for Hawaiian Pineapple Company to purchase the land, the animals, and all equipment of Frank F. Baldwin and Harry A. Baldwin upon the Island of Lanai.

After paying the agreed price of $1,100,000, the retention of the old head managers and the members of the board of supervisors [papa alakai] of the Lanai Company, Ltd., of each of their positions was approved.

All of the rights of the Lanai Company has accrued to the Hawaiian Pineapple Company, and a number of new leaders have been chosen for that company, those being: James D. Dole, president; Kenneth B. Barnes, secretary; R. S. West, treasurer.

The entirety of Lanai is owned by the Lanai Co., Ltd, except for 1,000 acres, some kuleana lands, and all animals, cows, sheep, structures and other equipment of the ranch.

The new company will continue ranching, however, according to what is clearly understood, it will begin to plant pineapple on approximately 20,000 acres of chosen land, when the time is right.

The first thing planned by the Hawaiian Pine Company is to farm on land bought in Waialua this year while put aside the lands on Lanai until the right time comes to farm there. What it must do prior to farming pineapple is to build a pier, roads, and housing for the laborers, and if that happens, then pineapple from that island will hit the market in 1927.

(Kuokoa, 12/7/1922, p. 1)

LILO O LANAI I KA HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE COMPANY

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 49, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 7, 1922.

Hawaiian Pine Advertisement, 1919.

150 Women

NEW POSITIONS WANTED FILLED SOON

AT THE PINEAPPLE PLANT

OF

Hawaiian Pineapple Co. [On Iwilei Street]

LOOK FOR THIS SIGN

HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE CO.

JAMES D. DOLE, President and Foreman

1700 workers are working there currently and are receiving good pay.

The set hours are 7 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. with half an hour food break.

High overtime pay is paid for work done over the regular hours.

Regular costs for food, 5¢, 10¢ and 15¢.

Snacks, 10¢ for school girls.

Food for free after 6 p. m. Special amenities for the women: Break room, lockers, seats for each working woman, head coverings, apron and rubber gloves supplied by the company.

There is much air and light.

Inquire Today

(Kuokoa, 7/18/1919, p. 2)

150 Mau Wahine

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 29, Aoao 2. Iulai 18, 1919.