Stephen Reynolds supports education of half-castes, 1847.

[COMMUNICATED.]

Mrs. Gummer’s School.—On Monday last an examination of Mrs. Gummer’s scholars took place at the residence of Stephen Reynolds, Esquire, Consul for the city of Bremen. This gentleman has for years distinguished himself as the active benefactor of children belonging to the class familiarly known as half-castes. It was he who first suggested the idea of a school to Mrs. Gummer, in which children of that class and of whites should be received indiscriminately. The preliminary difficulties to its establishment were overcome, mainly, through his exertions and the perseverance of Mrs. Gummer. Continue reading

Stephen Reynolds was in Honolulu while Kamehameha II lived there, 1868.

[Found under: “KA MOOLELO O NA KAMEHAMEHA.”]

When King Liholiho resided in Honolulu, there was an increase of haole living in Honolulu at that time; some were of high standing, some were ship captains, some were traders, and some had shops. The haole living there at the time were: Jones Aluli, Mister Parker [Mikapako], Stephen Reynolds [Lanai], Continue reading

The beginning of the “Pineapple Island,” 1922.

LANAI SOLD FOR A MILLION DOLLARS.

Last week Monday, it was confirmed that Lanai was purchased by Hawaiian Pineapple Company [Hui Halakahiki Hawaii] for the price of a million dollars.

The two owners of the island, except for a remainder of but a thousand acres, are Frank F. Baldwin and H. A. Baldwin, giving them ownership of about 130 square miles.

Included in this purchase was the land, animals, and the buildings of Lanai Ranch [hui hanai holoholona o Lanai].

The main purpose for buying the island of Lanai was to plant pineapple, but for the time being, the company will explore planting pineapple in Waialua, and within three or four years from now, they will think about planting pineapple on Lanai; but for now, ranching will continue on the island.

Before Lanai becomes a pineapple island, one of the things that the pineapple company must think about first is the building of a proper pier, and at the same time, to do test plantings of pineapple at different places to see how the pineapple grows or does not grow.

(Kuokoa, November 23, 1922, p. 3)

LILO O LANAI NO HOOKAHI MILIONA DALA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 47, Aoao 3. Novemaba 23, 1922.

People suspected of having leprosy held in jail, 1872.

The leprosy patients taken to Kalawao!

O Kuokoa Newspaper: Aloha kaua:—

Perhaps some two or three weeks ago, those afflicted with the “Chinese disease” were assembled in the jail here in Lahaina. And it wasn’t just people from Lahaina, but some were also from Lanai: men, women, and children. And on this past Saturday, August 10, they totalled 30; 21 from Lahaina nei and 9 from Lanai; but the gathering is not over. And in the coming weeks, it seems as if the total of all those put in the jail will reach forty or more. And when the Minister of the Interior [Hutchison] arrives from Honolulu, they are examined for those who should go to Kalawao, and the rest are released for another time.

Here are the names of those taken to Molokai aboard the ship Warwick [Wawiki], Captain Keoni Bulu, today, the 20th of Aug. 1872:

From here in Lahaina—Pahuhao, Kaohimaunu, Ekela, Kailiopu, Kalimalepo, Kalala, Kapiioho, Lono, John Europa [? Europe], Puaahiwa, Kiki, Mokumi, Kaailau, Kekahi, Kumano, Manuwai, Aiai, Kekapa, Alapai, and Kaiwi. From Lanai—Isemaela Pali, Nahora opio, Nui, and Kane.

All of these people, they were separated from their companions, and parents left their children, children left their parents, and so too did friends leave friends.

On the day they were taken, the pier of Keawaiki was packed, and the friends of those who were being separated wailed in grief, while some of them were determined to go along with their sick, but that was not possible; and it seemed that there were but five or six who went along for just a while then returned; and there was only one woman who swore that she’d go with her husband and leave her bones in Kalawao.

Kaiwi.

Lahaina, Aug. 22, 1872.

(Kuokoa, 8/31/1872, p. 2)

Na mai pake i laweia ma Kalawao!

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XI, Helu 35, Aoao 2. Augate 31, 1872.

Hawaiian Pine purchases Lanai, 1922.

LANAI GOES TO THE HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE COMPANY

Last Tuesday the deal went through for Hawaiian Pineapple Company to purchase the land, the animals, and all equipment of Frank F. Baldwin and Harry A. Baldwin upon the Island of Lanai.

After paying the agreed price of $1,100,000, the retention of the old head managers and the members of the board of supervisors [papa alakai] of the Lanai Company, Ltd., of each of their positions was approved.

All of the rights of the Lanai Company has accrued to the Hawaiian Pineapple Company, and a number of new leaders have been chosen for that company, those being: James D. Dole, president; Kenneth B. Barnes, secretary; R. S. West, treasurer.

The entirety of Lanai is owned by the Lanai Co., Ltd, except for 1,000 acres, some kuleana lands, and all animals, cows, sheep, structures and other equipment of the ranch.

The new company will continue ranching, however, according to what is clearly understood, it will begin to plant pineapple on approximately 20,000 acres of chosen land, when the time is right.

The first thing planned by the Hawaiian Pine Company is to farm on land bought in Waialua this year while put aside the lands on Lanai until the right time comes to farm there. What it must do prior to farming pineapple is to build a pier, roads, and housing for the laborers, and if that happens, then pineapple from that island will hit the market in 1927.

(Kuokoa, 12/7/1922, p. 1)

LILO O LANAI I KA HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE COMPANY

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 49, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 7, 1922.