Lahaina, and Hawaii through history, 1941.

OLD LAHAINA PRISON
and
ANCIENT LAHAINA

By INEZ ASHDOWN

According to information gleaned from the Bishop Museum records and the Archives of Mr. E. Bryan Jr., curator at the Museum, the old Lahaina Prison was built in 1851 and completed in April 1852. This was during the reign of Kamehameha III, who ruled until 1854.

For “local color” at that time I have talked with old Hawaiians who are from 70 to 80 years of age, and have also spent many hours at the Wailuku library reading old volumes supplied by Mrs. Juliette Davis, Librarian. Continue reading

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Lahaina, a o Hawaii nei hoi o ka wa kahiko, 1941.

KA HALEPAAHAO KAHIKO O LAHAINA ame LAHAINA KAHIKO

(Kakauia e Inez Ashdown)

E like me na mea i hooloaa ia mai ka moolelo mai o Hale Hoahu o na Mea Kahiko o Bihopa mai ia Mr. E. H. Bryan Jr., mea malama o ua hale la, o ka Halepaahao kahiko o Lahaina i kukulu ia i ka M. H. 1851 a pau nohoi i ka makahiki 1852 i ka wa keia e noho moi ana o Kamehameha III, Kauikeaouli, i noho moi a hiki i ka makahiki 1854.

O ke ano oia au hui au a kamailio me na Hawaii kahiko o 70 a hiki i ke 80 makahiki, a pela pu nohoi ma o ka hoohala ana he mau hora lehulehu maloko o ka Hale Waiho Buke o Wailuku e heluhelu ana hoi i na buke kahiko i hoolako ia mai ia’u e Mrs. Juliette Davis, ka mea malama Hale Hoahu Buke. Continue reading

Chinese New Year song in Lahaina, 1866.

[Found under: “Ka Happy New Year o na Pake”]

Iolidane:—Tahiti Tune.

1 La hauoli a pomaikai,
No ka lahui o Kina,
Ti ka char sow san nin fat choi
No ka makahiki hou,
Hape Nuia. Hape Nuia &co
E na makamaka nei.

2 Ke hui mai nei na kalepa
O ko Kina poe gentlemen,
Me ka lakou mau ladies no
A hauoli hoomaikai,
Ti ka kon hi. Ti ka kon hi, &co
And san nin Tat-i.

3 Na makua o keia hui
Me na keiki a lakou,
A pomaikai na mea a pau
Keia makahiki hou,
Choi tan qui sow. Choi tan qui sow
Hooili ia lakou.

4 Na ke Akua ma ka lani
Nana e hoomaikai mai
O keia hui ko Kina poe
E noho ma Hawaii nei,
Haleluia. Haleluia
No ka Haku ola mau.

5 Na Keonimana me na Lady
E aloha kakou a pau,
No ko kakou olioli,
Ka la nu Lahui o Kina,
Huro kakou! Huro kakou!!
A hauoli pu.

[Jordan [?]:—Tahiti Tune.
1 Joyous and blessed day,
For the Chinese people,
Ti ka char sow san nin fat choi
For the new year,
Happy New Year. Happy New Year &co
O Friends here.
2 The merchants have gathered
Of China’s gentlemen,
Along with their ladies
And blessed happiness
Ti ka kon hi. Ti ka kon hi, &co
And sun nin Tat-i.
3 The elders of this group
Along with their children,
Blessed is everyone
This new year,
Choi tan qui sow. Choi tan qui sow.
Onto them.
4 It is God in heaven
Who will bless them
This group of China’s people
Living in Hawaii nei,
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
For the eternal Lord.
5 The Gentlemen and Ladies
Aloha amongst all of us,
For our joy,
The holiday of the Chinese people,
Hurrah to us! Hurrah to us!!
And happiness too.]

This song was composed by one of these Chinese; S. P. Ahiong is his name, and he is the director in the playing of the Seraphim [Selapina], and he holds Seraphim concerts in the Wainee Church in Lahaina until today, and it may be something novel to see for those who are into new things; seeing this skilled Chinese singer, he probably has no match amongst all the Chinese who have come to Hawaii nei. After this song, Rev. D. Baldwin gave a prayer and the banquet started with much calm; all of the respected haole of that Calm land which aloha has put forth, along with our Governor [Paulo Nahaolelua] who came by….

[This is just a portion of a much larger article describing the new year celebration in Lahaina. There are more mele!]

(Kuokoa, 3/3/1866, p. 4)

Iolidane

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Maraki 3, 1866.

Keahu Kealiiaukai, an awesome biography, 1941.

Recalling the Days of Kamehameha V.

KEAHU KEALIIAUKAI

Keahu Kealiiaukai is one of the last Hawaiians left who is not proficient in English. He is a Hawaiian famous for his knowledge of plants, and he is 82 years old. He lives in Lahaina, Maui, the capital of Hawaii in days of yore. Kealiiaukai is now living with his daughter, Mrs. Juliette Pali.

When Kealiiaukai was born in Kaupo, Maui, on the road going to the crater of Haleakala, in the year 1859, this was the fifth year of Kamehameha IV’s reign over Hawaii nei. Kealiiaukai was 4 when that monarch died. He does not recall this.

Remembering the King.

However, Kealiiaukai does in fact remember Kamehameha V, or King Kapuaiwa, his given name; and the last of the Kamehamehas. Kapuaiwa went to Lahaina numerous times, where he was welcomed warmly by his makaainana.

In Kealiiaukai’s eighty and two years of life, he witnessed the passing of the monarchs of his homeland, closing with the overturning of the nation under Queen Liliuokalani’s protection, in 1893. Then the establishing of the provisional government and the Republic of Hawaii, and the joining of the Islands to the United States and the formation of this Territory of America, 40 years ago.

A Religious Man

Kealiiaukai is an important man in Lahaina for the kamaaina there. His wife left this world eight years ago, but she did not however leave behind children. Kealiiaukai is still strong and active. He participates often in works of this Father in Heaven. He spent his life being a member of the Faith of the Latter Day.

Perhaps he is the last medicine man living and practicing from before the times when there was licensing of those in that profession. During his time, it is said that Kealiiaukai practiced healing with plants amongst his own people and healed them due to his expertise in the use of plants growing in the forests of Hawaii, for all types of illnesses.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 3/5/1941, p. 1)

Hoomanao Ina La O Kamehameha V

Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 45, Page 1. Malaki 5, 1941.

A cure for leprosy in Hawaii? 1865.

[For the Kuokoa]

Leprosy [“Chinese Disease”]

An Answer.

To you Doctor Gulick [Kauka Kulika]; Aloha oe:—

In the Mar. 30th issue of the Kuokoa, on page 2, there is a statement, “I have been told that Doctor Baldwin [Kauka Baluina] has cured some patients of this type. Is this true? If this is true, he should tell us.” It is to this question that I am responding to. It is indeed true, some people were cured with the medicine I am administering to those with the “Chinese disease.” Five are the number of those who ingested the medicine here in Lahaina. Three of them were totally cured; two, did not follow the instructions for the medicine and followed after this medicine and that medicine Hawaiians are taking for the “mai Pake.” Therefore, I’ve given up on that medicine [for those two]. I’ve given the medicine to a woman in Koolau, Oahu and I’ve heard that her “mai Pake” is somewhat better.

I did not consider prescribing this medicine to a great number of patients from the beginning; but instead to wait, and to see the affects of the medicine and if it was effective or not. Therefore, I watched carefully the people I cared after here in Lahaina; and I am hopeful that all the leprosy patients will be cured with this medicine. Let us not boast, for medicine like this has been given in other countries, and it is said that some have been cured while the illness of other has been persistent. The “Chinese disease” is referred to amongst enlightened Doctors [Kahuna lapaau] as leprosy [lepera]; leprosy is its name; however this is not the exact same thing as the leprosy of the Israelites. Some Doctors from Europe say that if this is a new leprosy, it is curable; if it is an ancient leprosy, it cannot be cured. A skilled Doctor from France, he says, all of the leprosy patients he has seen, both the new and ancient types, are curable only with this medicine.

If we are talking about ancient leprosy, I will mention one of these maii Pake cured in Lahaina. It is a man who is over fifty years of age; he was afflicted with mai Pake for fourteen years; his eyes were swollen, and his ears were knobby, lumpy, swollen, shiny, and thick; his feet and fingers were swollen, and he could do no work. He was treated by the Doctors of Lahaina; I gave him a lot of medicine, without his illness lessening. And I came upon this medicine I am working with, and gave him a pill in the morning and one at night. That is how he took this medicine every day, and three months and a half went by. He was careful in what he ate. His illness lessened; and after those months were over, his disease was entirely cured. This is now a year that he’s been cured, and the disease has not reappeared.

This is ancient leprosy.

I will not say what the name of this medicine is, for it is a poison if an unskilled one uses it. It would not be good if a Hawaiian prescribed this medicine. It is only for educated Doctors and just for them.

I am not the only one with this medicine for leprosy. All of the Haole Doctors in Hawaii have it, and they know well how to prescribe it for leprosy patients. This medicine is made into a liquid sometimes; it is the same medicine. The doctors of Honolulu have prescribed this medicine and other medicines to some leprosy patients, and they were cured. The medicine Book speaks of this medicine as good for leprosy. Dr. Good of London, a haole that is brilliant in doctoring says, “There is no other medicine that is as powerful and good for curing leprosy in all lands.” I spoke with the doctors of Honolulu about this illness, and Dr. Judd made some medicine for me. Doctor Smith [Mika] of Koloa prescribed this drug, and told me that it is a good medicine. Doctor Wetmore [Wetemore] of Hilo assisted me greatly in this effort, and said, “Try this medicine for the leprosy patients in Lahaina.”

If this is how prepared the Haole Doctors are for this disease, where does the problem lie with leprosy amongst us? Here is the problem; most of the leprosy patients are terribly simpleminded. They want to get cured quickly and follow after this or that foolishness called a medicine that works. There are many Hawaiians, uneducated people, who are treating leprosy, prescribing this medicine and that, haole medicine as well as Hawaiian medicine. One person says, “You will be cured with awa.” There are many who are fond of pain killers [penikila]; some cut their flesh with a piece of glass; and some here in Lahaina persist in eating cat, because some Chinese said, if they eat cat meat, they will be cured. In the year 1863, there were 50 leprosy patients in Lahaina—ten of them died that year. The illness of some of them was not that severe, but they died. In my opinion, they died because of bad medical treatment. These days, some of us who have this disease, they are strong and fine; they have an appetite, and go around here and there, but while they are strong, they die all of a sudden. What is tha about? His doctor is blind. It would be good to punish them for murder.

This land will be blessed by the good law for the leprosy patients that was passed this year. Those people must be segregated, or the land will be full of that horrible thing. I do not believe that it is right to put the patients on a ship and send them to another island, or the islands will become infested. It would be better that there be some small buildings where they are to live—two on Hawaii, two on Maui, and one on Oahu, and so forth. If it is done correctly, and if it is the Haole Doctor that does the treating, I am hopeful that in less than five years’ time, leprosy will be gone from the land.

With aloha,

D. Baldwin.

[Read this article, and then read the following post…]

(Kuokoa, 4/13/1865, p. 1)

Mai Pake.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 15, Aoao 1. Aperila 13, 1865.

People suspected of having leprosy held in jail, 1872.

The leprosy patients taken to Kalawao!

O Kuokoa Newspaper: Aloha kaua:—

Perhaps some two or three weeks ago, those afflicted with the “Chinese disease” were assembled in the jail here in Lahaina. And it wasn’t just people from Lahaina, but some were also from Lanai: men, women, and children. And on this past Saturday, August 10, they totalled 30; 21 from Lahaina nei and 9 from Lanai; but the gathering is not over. And in the coming weeks, it seems as if the total of all those put in the jail will reach forty or more. And when the Minister of the Interior [Hutchison] arrives from Honolulu, they are examined for those who should go to Kalawao, and the rest are released for another time.

Here are the names of those taken to Molokai aboard the ship Warwick [Wawiki], Captain Keoni Bulu, today, the 20th of Aug. 1872:

From here in Lahaina—Pahuhao, Kaohimaunu, Ekela, Kailiopu, Kalimalepo, Kalala, Kapiioho, Lono, John Europa [? Europe], Puaahiwa, Kiki, Mokumi, Kaailau, Kekahi, Kumano, Manuwai, Aiai, Kekapa, Alapai, and Kaiwi. From Lanai—Isemaela Pali, Nahora opio, Nui, and Kane.

All of these people, they were separated from their companions, and parents left their children, children left their parents, and so too did friends leave friends.

On the day they were taken, the pier of Keawaiki was packed, and the friends of those who were being separated wailed in grief, while some of them were determined to go along with their sick, but that was not possible; and it seemed that there were but five or six who went along for just a while then returned; and there was only one woman who swore that she’d go with her husband and leave her bones in Kalawao.

Kaiwi.

Lahaina, Aug. 22, 1872.

(Kuokoa, 8/31/1872, p. 2)

Na mai pake i laweia ma Kalawao!

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XI, Helu 35, Aoao 2. Augate 31, 1872.

Moo at Mokuhinia, Lahaina, 1861.

Child Grabbed by Moo.

On the evening of the 7th of this month, that being a Friday, a couple of small children were bathing in Mokuhinia Pond in Lahaina, close to the bridge [uapo], when the sun was going down.

One of them continued to bathe, his name was Lono; he was almost eight years old, and his height was four feet. Right then after, this boy plain disappeared, but his parents did not think that he disappeared in the water.

A woman named Paahao saw a long fish in the water like an Swordfish [Auau], and its belly was white; she called out to the mother of the boy, “There is a long fish in the water with a white belly.” The mother named Kaohe said, “You must be confusing it with a Turtle.” The other responded, “Let’s go and see.” Kaohe went, and lo and behold, it was as Paahao had seen. Paahao went to go see the fish from atop the bridge while Kaohe continued to watch the fish; after a little time, Kaohe’s eyes were struck [temporarily blinded? “paia mai la ka maka”] and the water turned white, and the fish disappeared from her sight. As for Paahao, she arrived atop the bridge and the fish sprayed up dust, and it disappeared.

Then after, the two thought of Lono, and that he disappeared in the water. And they concluded that this was a moo that had revealed itself for Lono. They searched and went to look on the bridge, but it was not seen.

The father of the boy arrived, named Maalewa. He looked under the bridge, and come to find out, he saw the boy in the water where he was hidden by the moo; his body was attached to the coral and his hair was all that could be seen on the surface of the water.

The father grabbed him by the hair, and pulled him up, and he was almost dead; his body was stiff from top to bottom, and his eyes could not see, and his skin was slimy, which was believed to be the slime of the moo.

He was massaged by his parents until seven in the evening, whereupon he got slightly better but did not say a word, but later he revived.

Therefore, this was something miraculous to see; let it be known to all our friends from Hawaii to Kauai.

T. W. NAKAIKUAANA, PUAA.

Lahaina, Maui. June 8, 1861.

This is the remarkable thing; the foolishness of man. The women saw the child shaking in the water, close to dying, and they did not grab him and save him; but they just stood there saying, “A moo! A moo!” Auwe! the foolishness and heartlessness of some people. If the father had not arrived then, the child would be dead.

[I posted this article a long time ago on the Hoolaupai Facebook page, but because it has such bad search capabilities, i can’t find it. That is one of the reasons i started this blog. Searching for names or places or subjects, etc., is so much easier to do!

I am not sure what the commentary at the bottom is referring to, about the women seeing the boy shaking in the water…

For more on Mokuhinia and the work being done to restore this historic place, see: Friends of Mokuula.]

(Hae Hawaii, 6/12/1861, p. 41)

Keiki puliki ia e ka Moo.

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 6, Ano Hou.—Helu 11, Aoao 41. Iune 12, 1861.