Reissue of copyright for J. W. H. Kauwahi’s “Kuhikuhi o Kanaka Hawaii,” 1868.

COPYRIGHT.

BE IT REMEMBERED THAT, ON THE 1st day of February, A. D. 1858, J. W. H. KAUWAHI, of Lahainaluna, Island of Maui, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as author, in the words following, to wit:

“Kuhikuhi o Kanaka Hawaii.”

Now, therefore, know all men by these presents, that I, L. Kamehameha, H. H. M.’s Minister of the Interior, in accordance with a resolution of the King in Privy Council, bearing date the 15th day of February, 1858, and by virtue of the authority in me vested by Section 1st of the general provisions of Article 4. Chapter 7, of the Act to organize the Executive Departments—laws 1845 and 1846—do hereby grant unto the said J. W. H. Kauwahi, his executors, administrators and assigns, the sole right and liberty of printing, reprinting, publishing and vending the said book of forms in the Hawaiian Islands, for the term of ten years from the 15th day of February, A. D. 1858.

In testimony whereof I, L. Kamehameha, His Majesty’s Minister of the Interior, have caused the seal of the Interior office to be hereunto affixed this 18th day of February, A. D. 1859.  L. KAMEHAMEHA.

Be it remembered that, on the 22d day of February, A. D. 1868, J. W. H. Kauwahi, of Lahaina, Island of Maui, in accordance with Section 3d of an Act “To encourage learning in this Kingdom, by securing the copies of charts, maps and books to the authors and proprietors of such copies,” approved on the 31st day of December, 1864, has deposited in this office a copy of his book, entitled,

“KUHIKUHI O KE KANAKA HAWAII,”

The rights of which he claims as author.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the Interior Department to be affixed at Honolulu, this 18th day of March, A. D. 1868.

FERD. W. HUTCHISON,

Minister of the Interior.

[Wow. I have personally not seen a copyright issued before in the Kingdom. I wonder how many were issued total. I came across this announcement and recalled a recent post on this publication put up by the Hawaiian Historical Society. What a coincidence.]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 4/18/1868, p. 2)

COPYRIGHT.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XII, Number 40, Page 2. April 18, 1868.

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Announcing the first Kamehameha Day, 1872.

BY AUTHORITY.

Tuesday, the 11th of June, the Day of Commemoration of Kamehameha I, will be observed as a Holiday, and all Government Offices will be closed.

Ferd. W. Hutchison.

Minister of the Interior [Kuhina Kalaiaina].

Office of the Interior [Keena Kalaiaina], June 4, 1872.

(Au Okoa, 6/6/1872, p. 2)

MA KE KAUOHA.

Ke Au Okoa, Buke VIII, Helu 8, Aoao 2. Iune 6, 1872.

People suspected of having leprosy held in jail, 1872.

The leprosy patients taken to Kalawao!

O Kuokoa Newspaper: Aloha kaua:—

Perhaps some two or three weeks ago, those afflicted with the “Chinese disease” were assembled in the jail here in Lahaina. And it wasn’t just people from Lahaina, but some were also from Lanai: men, women, and children. And on this past Saturday, August 10, they totalled 30; 21 from Lahaina nei and 9 from Lanai; but the gathering is not over. And in the coming weeks, it seems as if the total of all those put in the jail will reach forty or more. And when the Minister of the Interior [Hutchison] arrives from Honolulu, they are examined for those who should go to Kalawao, and the rest are released for another time.

Here are the names of those taken to Molokai aboard the ship Warwick [Wawiki], Captain Keoni Bulu, today, the 20th of Aug. 1872:

From here in Lahaina—Pahuhao, Kaohimaunu, Ekela, Kailiopu, Kalimalepo, Kalala, Kapiioho, Lono, John Europa [? Europe], Puaahiwa, Kiki, Mokumi, Kaailau, Kekahi, Kumano, Manuwai, Aiai, Kekapa, Alapai, and Kaiwi. From Lanai—Isemaela Pali, Nahora opio, Nui, and Kane.

All of these people, they were separated from their companions, and parents left their children, children left their parents, and so too did friends leave friends.

On the day they were taken, the pier of Keawaiki was packed, and the friends of those who were being separated wailed in grief, while some of them were determined to go along with their sick, but that was not possible; and it seemed that there were but five or six who went along for just a while then returned; and there was only one woman who swore that she’d go with her husband and leave her bones in Kalawao.

Kaiwi.

Lahaina, Aug. 22, 1872.

(Kuokoa, 8/31/1872, p. 2)

Na mai pake i laweia ma Kalawao!

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XI, Helu 35, Aoao 2. Augate 31, 1872.

More from Kalaupapa—the early years of the leprosy settlement, 1867.

About the Leprosy Patients of Molokai.

Looking through H. M. Whitney’s newspaper [Pacific Commercial Advertiser? Nupepa Kuokoa?], of these past weeks, we came upon Dr. Bikinika [?]’s letter stating that he went to tour the Leprosy Hospital in Kalaupapa, and witnessed the plight of the leprosy patients—the lack of doctors and the lack of other living necessities. Later, we saw another letter in the same paper confirming the many difficulties of the patients in Kalaupapa. We did not imagine we’d see another letter, by R. W. Meyer of Molokai, speaking about things relating to the patients, and saying that there indeed was a crate of beef on the street, adding, “The beef was spoiled, but it was no more spoiled than what they eat, so it is fine for them.”

And in the Au Okoa of this past Monday, we again saw talk of the leprosy patients, as follows: “We are always facing many difficulties these days; there are problems with sickness, food (‘ai and i‘a), and clothing; we are troubled because we have no medical care—do not imagine that there is a life for us, for that is not at all the case, not at all.” And it is perhaps because of this statement above that the Minister of the Interior, Dr. Hutchison went there to see the difficulties of those people.

After much consideration of these problems shown above, we are stirred to respond with the question, “Is is right for the Government to continue the Leprosy Hospital in Kalaupapa, Molokai?” We say, “No, it is definitely not right to totally separate the leprosy housing there, and instead, to set aside a place here on Oahu, someplace close to Doctors; and the cries of the patients for lack of food, clothing, and so forth, can be immediately looked at. Being that this is not an extremely contagious disease like smallpox, they should be returned to Oahu. It can only be spread by living together, eating together, sleeping together with one or more of the people who have leprosy.

(Kuokoa, 2/23/1867, p. 2)

No na Lepera o Molokai

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 8, Aoao 2. Feberuari 23, 1867.