Coconut grove of Kamehameha V at Kalamaula, Molokai, 1923.

[Found under: “NA ANOAI”]

Those who did not know before of the coconut grove planted by Kamehameha V in 1871 now know. These coconut trees were planted that year, and when he returned here to Honolulu, he died a year later in 1872. This coconut grove has grown very tall, and because they were planted close together, there are not much fruit. But it stands as a monument to this Alii, and is called by his name because it was planted by his own hands.

[Check out Nanea Armstrong-Wassel’s post on more famous ulu niu!

It is also interesting to note that in the article “KA HUAKAI MAKAIKAI IA MOLOKAI” by W. J. Coelho, describing a trip around Molokai, found in Kuokoa, 7/6/1922, p. 3, it says:

I spoke of the coconut grove of Kamehameha V in Kalamaula. It is said that it was Kamehameha V who planted that coconut grove in 1864. The truth is that it was Meyer senior [Maea makua]—during the time of the King, Kamehameha IV who planted it. That was when Meyer married the mother of the Meyer family. When they were wed, they went upland of Kalae, and built a little house. It was a grass hut. Meyer began to work hard and peddled butter. After, Meyer was granted the care over the lands of Kamehameha IV, he planted coconuts by the beach, as a place to go for his lord the alii. It was Meyer who planted them, and not anyone else. Meyer himself told an important man of Honolulu, and it was from him I got this information.]

(Kuokoa, 4/26/1923, p. 2)

Ua ike aku na kanaka i ike ole mamua...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXII, Helu 17, Aoao 2. Aperila 26, 1923.

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Packages to go to Kalaupapa, 1881.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

All who desire to send Packages, or Cash perhaps to their suffering friends and intimates in the Leprosy Colony in Kalaupapa, They are ordered to give their packages with the name clearly written on it, to Mr. Henry Waterhouse [Henre Walakahauki] in Honolulu, and it is he that will send it direct to Kalaupapa, or give a Check [Bila Kikoo Dala] to the one living there.

R. W. MYER [MEYER],

Agent of the Board of Health for Molokai.

Kalae, Molokai, Nov. 17, 1881.

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 12/24/1881, p. 3)

OLELO HOOLAHA.

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IV, Helu 52, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 24, 1881.

More from Puheemiki on C. Strawn in Kalawao, 1883.

THE NEWS OF KALAWAO

The sun is shining; this wind is howling in the Koolau of Kalawao; their path lies to the west.

These days, it is the first time the brows of the cliffs of the mountains have been sighted, which are constantly blocked by floating clouds; the fields are constantly covered by gray mist; and the voice of the ocean constantly roars in the sea cliffs both night and day.

Our superintendent, C. Strawn, is secretly selling the house lumber that the Board of Health sent for the patients, at 3½ cents per yard, and hundreds of yards were sold on the 16th of this month. We just found out about this, we didn’t know from earlier.

The new church of the protestant brethren of Kalawao stands proudly, her walls are beautiful, and her bell tower is stands unobstructed; this was done skillfully under T. Solomoa [T. Solomona], but it is not completed.

Some major problems here in Kalawao were remedied by the agent of the Board of Health, R. W. Meyer, earlier this month; the claim for damages by W. H. Kala and J. K. Awihi against the Board of Health, for the seizing of their property by the Board of Health on the 18th of this past June, totaling $357.25; here is the deceitful thing: this important claim was hidden away by R. W. Meyer, and this was his decision. “The Board of Health was justified in the seizing of this property.” They two of them filed suit once again before a judge.”

Letters seen addressed outside to the Kuokoa or the Pae Aina¹ are torn apart; that is what I hear. This letter is being sent at Kalaupapa.  William Puheemiki.

[Does anyone know which Protestant church in Kalawao this would be being built in 1883?]

¹Ko Hawaii Pae Aina

(Kuokoa, 8/25/1883, p. 3)

NA MEA HOU O KALAWAO

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXII, Helu 34, Aoao 3. Augate 25, 1883.

More from Kalaupapa—the early years of the leprosy settlement, 1867.

About the Leprosy Patients of Molokai.

Looking through H. M. Whitney’s newspaper [Pacific Commercial Advertiser? Nupepa Kuokoa?], of these past weeks, we came upon Dr. Bikinika [?]’s letter stating that he went to tour the Leprosy Hospital in Kalaupapa, and witnessed the plight of the leprosy patients—the lack of doctors and the lack of other living necessities. Later, we saw another letter in the same paper confirming the many difficulties of the patients in Kalaupapa. We did not imagine we’d see another letter, by R. W. Meyer of Molokai, speaking about things relating to the patients, and saying that there indeed was a crate of beef on the street, adding, “The beef was spoiled, but it was no more spoiled than what they eat, so it is fine for them.”

And in the Au Okoa of this past Monday, we again saw talk of the leprosy patients, as follows: “We are always facing many difficulties these days; there are problems with sickness, food (‘ai and i‘a), and clothing; we are troubled because we have no medical care—do not imagine that there is a life for us, for that is not at all the case, not at all.” And it is perhaps because of this statement above that the Minister of the Interior, Dr. Hutchison went there to see the difficulties of those people.

After much consideration of these problems shown above, we are stirred to respond with the question, “Is is right for the Government to continue the Leprosy Hospital in Kalaupapa, Molokai?” We say, “No, it is definitely not right to totally separate the leprosy housing there, and instead, to set aside a place here on Oahu, someplace close to Doctors; and the cries of the patients for lack of food, clothing, and so forth, can be immediately looked at. Being that this is not an extremely contagious disease like smallpox, they should be returned to Oahu. It can only be spread by living together, eating together, sleeping together with one or more of the people who have leprosy.

(Kuokoa, 2/23/1867, p. 2)

No na Lepera o Molokai

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 8, Aoao 2. Feberuari 23, 1867.