Marble memorial to Lorenzo Lyons, 1886.

A CALL TO THE SUNDAY SCHOOLS ALL AROUND THE ARCHIPELAGO.

By the kindness of the Father, God, and Lord Jesus Christ, taken from the circle of our living was our dearly beloved father, Rev. L. Laiana, and he left behind his benevolent works for which our people are greatly indebted, as a monument [kia hoomanao] before our eyes, and before all of the Sunday School students around the Archipelago [Pae Aina].

Therefore, at the meeting of your Executive Committee [Komite Hooko], held on the 9th of November, at Kaumakapili, it was unanimously decided to erect a Marble Monument for the father, Rev. L. Laiana, and to enclose it in a fine iron fence.
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Missionary descendants, 1894.

Who indeed are the missionaries.

Armstrong is telling lies to the American League [Hui Amerika] about the thoughts of the Hawaiians; that all of the haole are the missionaries!

The Hawaiians are not mistaken in the least as to their recognition of the family and circle of missionaries, not at all. The general thought amongst the Lahui Hawaii is this:

All of the descendants of the haole missionaries and the haole who make as if they are steadfast to the Bible, who stand at the pulpit, and of the hypocritical haole Sunday school leaders; and all of the haole who wear the disguise of the missionary; those are who the Lahui Hawaii call: the missionaries. That is the truth.

You, O Armstrong, you are a missionary; and Mr. Neumann, he is not a missionary. Castle, he is a missionary; and Mr. Marquis though is not a missionary. Henry Waterhouse, he is a missionary; Mr. Campbell is not a missionary, and so forth. The Hawaiians do indeed know who is in the circle of missionaries; and they know who the haole are who are in the circle of vagrants.

As for you, O Armstrong, your trade is growing oysters on the banks of the calm Delaware and Chesapeake River and Bay, and due to the oysters going elsewhere, you took a loss and that is why you wandered back here to Hawaii nei, to find a job to support you in your old age.

[I am not sure who the “Mr. Marquis” referred to here is.]

(Oiaio, 2/16/1894, p. 2)

Owai la ka poe mikanele.

Ka Oiaio, Buke VI, Helu 7, Aoao 2. Feberuari 16, 1894.

Packages to go to Kalaupapa, 1881.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

All who desire to send Packages, or Cash perhaps to their suffering friends and intimates in the Leprosy Colony in Kalaupapa, They are ordered to give their packages with the name clearly written on it, to Mr. Henry Waterhouse [Henre Walakahauki] in Honolulu, and it is he that will send it direct to Kalaupapa, or give a Check [Bila Kikoo Dala] to the one living there.

R. W. MYER [MEYER],

Agent of the Board of Health for Molokai.

Kalae, Molokai, Nov. 17, 1881.

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 12/24/1881, p. 3)

OLELO HOOLAHA.

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IV, Helu 52, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 24, 1881.

Hawaiianized names and sample ballot, 1892.

[It would be very helpful if there was some sort of great listing of Hawaiianized names readily available, because often times unless you just know, or are lucky enough to have another reference, you will not know who is being spoken about or even sometimes how to pronounce the name. Notice in this sample ballot:]

Henry Waterhouse, Walakahauki

J. N. S. Williams, Wiliama

Paul Neumann, Paulo Numana

A. Marques, Makuika

John Ross, Kapena Loke

J. A. Cummins, Keoni Kamaki

E. B. Thomas, Kamaki

John Ena, Keoni Ina

James Gay, Kimo Ke

A. P. Peterson, Aka Pikekona

[What it is even trickier is when there are multiple names for the same person. For instance, Waterhouse is “Walakahauki,” “Walakahausi,” “Halewai,”…]

(Daily Bulletin, 2/1/1892, p. 2)

HOW TO VOTE.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume III, Number 334, Page 2. February 1, 1892.