David Kawananakoa speaks on annexation, 1893.

WILL APPEAL TO CONGRESS.

Ex-Queen Liliuokalani’s Commissioner Arrives at the National Capital.

Washington, Feb. 18.—Paul Neuman, the envoy of Queen Liliuokalani to the United States, accompanied by Prince David, of the royal family, and two servants, reached the city late last night, and took apartments at the Richmond. To-day Mr. Neuman held a conference with acting Secretary of State Wharton, with whom he had a long talk concerning the object of his visit. Mr. Wharton could, of course, do nothing, and Mr. Neuman expressed himself as satisfied that his only chance for successfully representing the claims of the ex-Queen lay through the medium of Congress. Prince David said: “We do not intend to make a struggle against annexation. If the United States government sees fit to annex Hawaii we shall make no complaints.”

[I am not sure if this statement was ever published in any Hawaii newspaper.]

(Indianapolis Journal, 2/19/1893, p. 4)

WILL APPEAL TO CONGRESS.

The Indianapolis Journal, Page 4. February 19, 1893.

Morning Call and Princess Kaiulani’s protest, 1893.

WAIL OF A PRINCESS.

Kaiulani Will Come to America in Her Own Interest.

She Was Sent Away to Be Educated, and Now She Is Kept In Ignorance.

Special to The Morning Call.

London, Feb. 18.—The Princess Kaiulani sends the following address to the American people:

“Four years ago, at the request of Thurston, the Hawaiian Cabinet Minister, I was sent away to England to be educated privately and fitted  for the position which, by the constitution of Hawaii, I was to inherit.

“All these years I have patiently and in exile striven to fit myself for my return this year to my country.

“I am now told that Thurston is in Washington asking you to take away my flag and my throne. No one tells me even this officially. Have I done anything wrong that this wrong should be done me and my people?

“I am coming to Washington to plead for my throne, my nation and my flag. Will not the great American people hear me?

“Kaiulani.”

Washington, Feb. 18.—While the annexation commissioners were paying their respects to Secretary Elkins at the War Department this morning their diplomatic antagonist, Paul Neumann, the ex-Queen’s representative, was in another part of the building in consultation with acting Secretary Wharton of the State Department, with whom he had a long talk concerning the object of his visit. Wharton, of course, could do nothing, and Neumann expressed himself as satisfied. His chance for successfully representing the claims of the ex-Queen lay through the medium of Congress.

Prince David said: “We do not intend to make a struggle against annexation. If the United States Government sees fit to annex Hawaii we shall make no complaint.”

[Although the same quote was printed in newspapers across America, what each newspaper did with the title varies. Also, what they put next to the article should be looked at as well. The Morning Call was printed in San Francisco.

The quote by David Kawananakoa at the bottom is interesting.]

(Morning Call, 2/19/1893, p. 1)

WAIL OF A PRINCESS.

The Morning Call, Volume LXXIII, Number 81, Page 1. February 19, 1893.

Missionary descendants, 1894.

Who indeed are the missionaries.

Armstrong is telling lies to the American League [Hui Amerika] about the thoughts of the Hawaiians; that all of the haole are the missionaries!

The Hawaiians are not mistaken in the least as to their recognition of the family and circle of missionaries, not at all. The general thought amongst the Lahui Hawaii is this:

All of the descendants of the haole missionaries and the haole who make as if they are steadfast to the Bible, who stand at the pulpit, and of the hypocritical haole Sunday school leaders; and all of the haole who wear the disguise of the missionary; those are who the Lahui Hawaii call: the missionaries. That is the truth.

You, O Armstrong, you are a missionary; and Mr. Neumann, he is not a missionary. Castle, he is a missionary; and Mr. Marquis though is not a missionary. Henry Waterhouse, he is a missionary; Mr. Campbell is not a missionary, and so forth. The Hawaiians do indeed know who is in the circle of missionaries; and they know who the haole are who are in the circle of vagrants.

As for you, O Armstrong, your trade is growing oysters on the banks of the calm Delaware and Chesapeake River and Bay, and due to the oysters going elsewhere, you took a loss and that is why you wandered back here to Hawaii nei, to find a job to support you in your old age.

[I am not sure who the “Mr. Marquis” referred to here is.]

(Oiaio, 2/16/1894, p. 2)

Owai la ka poe mikanele.

Ka Oiaio, Buke VI, Helu 7, Aoao 2. Feberuari 16, 1894.

Queen Liliuokalani being tried in military court, 1895.

MILITARY COURT.

Most of the previous week was spent trying just one case, that of V. V. Ashford, accused of misprision of treason [huna kipi]. He denied the charges, and defense witnesses were brought in. The defendant was also brought in to defend himself, however, the defense Lawyer did not had no planned words for the benefit of his client, and he was continuiously questioned for four days and more. But he put a request before the Military Court [Aha Koa] to release the prisoner [lawehala]. The Lawyer for the public for the Military Court will weigh the testimony of the accused and the testimony of the people, and will sentence the offender. His ruling of case is being considered.

When the Military Court convened in the afternoon of February 1, those imprisoned under the charge of treason: Keki, Keoho, Tommy Ai, Nameless [Listed as Olii in 2/1/1895 Hawaiian Star.], John Piko, W. Kekoa, Kaanaana, Ulukou, Elia, Sam Hookano, Kahikikolu, Koia Kapena, Waianae, Keawe, Hikileo, George Makalena, Kamae, Kalawalu, James H. Bush, Buff Moepali, Manuel Rosa, and John H. Wise.

Each of them were asked if they wanted a lawyer. Twenty-one of them answered in the negative, saying that they did not want a lawyer, and J. H. Wise was the only one who wanted to be defended by the attorney Neumann. Therefore Wise’s case was postponed to a later date, and he was taken out.

Ulukou was the only one of the prisoners who objected to Captain Camara sitting to judge, and Camara was dismissed from sitting on the Commission. The remaining members of the Military Commission were not objected to.

The charges were read, and each were asked for their response. The first seven named admitted to their guilt, and the rest denied the charges. With the questioning of the witnesses, it was made clear that they were only on the outside of the military camp where the weapons were ministered to, however, according to some people, they were urged and enticed, and that is the reason some of them went to the area of the military camp. Their verdict is being considered.

At 11:15 midday of Tuesday, February 5, Liliuokalani Dominis was taken from her room where she is held prisoner in the Executive Building [Iolani Palace], to the grand Room [throne room] where the Military Trials are being held, filled with spectators. Major Potter escorted Mrs. Dominis accompanied to the door by Mrs. C. B. Wilson, then Lieutenant Kenake brought her in and sat her to the left of her lawyer Neumann. Mrs. Dominis was wearing a black dress with a hat of the same color, and her honor and royal dignity of when she sat upon the throne had fallen and shattered. The charges were read to Mrs. Dominis, of the crime she was accused of, misprision of treason, however her attorney was criticized for asking that the trial be postponed until another day. On the following Wednesday and Thursday were the responses of the prisoner and the witnesses. Mrs. Dominis vehemently denied any knowledge of the planning for war, but did admit to appointing a new cabinet of Ministers for herself.

[When looking at anything, like this article, it is important to try and understand the context. The Kuokoa, during this period at least, seems to be pro-annexation and pro-American. By reading this and the rest of its pages, you can see it is definitely not pro-Monarchy!

What were the other Hawaiian-Language Newspapers saying? The Oiaio, which was a weekly, issued a paper on 1/4/1895, and only after 10 weeks, on 3/15/1895, did it/could it print its next issue. Leo o ka Lahui, a daily which printed from Mondays through Fridays, printed an issue on 1/4/1895, and stopped/was stopped from printing until 3/12/1895 (although this issue seems not extant). What were the other English-language newspapers saying? What were the other language papers reporting?]

(Kuokoa, 2/9/1895, p. 2)

KA AHA HOOKOLOKOLO KOA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIV, Helu 6, Aoao 2. Feberuari 9, 1895.

Hawaiianized names and sample ballot, 1892.

[It would be very helpful if there was some sort of great listing of Hawaiianized names readily available, because often times unless you just know, or are lucky enough to have another reference, you will not know who is being spoken about or even sometimes how to pronounce the name. Notice in this sample ballot:]

Henry Waterhouse, Walakahauki

J. N. S. Williams, Wiliama

Paul Neumann, Paulo Numana

A. Marques, Makuika

John Ross, Kapena Loke

J. A. Cummins, Keoni Kamaki

E. B. Thomas, Kamaki

John Ena, Keoni Ina

James Gay, Kimo Ke

A. P. Peterson, Aka Pikekona

[What it is even trickier is when there are multiple names for the same person. For instance, Waterhouse is “Walakahauki,” “Walakahausi,” “Halewai,”…]

(Daily Bulletin, 2/1/1892, p. 2)

HOW TO VOTE.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume III, Number 334, Page 2. February 1, 1892.